Axial’s AS-3 Servo Upgrade

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Axial’s AS-3 servo is standard equipment in all RTR Axial vehicles. We know most people hear the term “RTR servo” and they immediately think an “upgrade” is in order. But, this servo is actually very capable for an RTR servo, especially when used in conjunction with 1.9 wheels and tires. The AS-3 servo is a digital servo, it has metal gears and is rated at 150 ounces of torque at 6.0 volts. The one drawback that this servo does have is the main output shaft is supported by a plastic bushing rather than a bearing. After you have run a few battery packs through your RTR you may notice a little slop in the servo’s output shaft where the servo horn attaches. Once dirt gets in around the output shaft and bushing, it starts to wear the bushing fairly quickly. As the bushing wears the servo output shaft will develop some side to side play. Once it wears to a certain point your gear mesh will be compromised and you run the risk of stripping teeth off a servo gear. Luckily for us Fast Eddy Bearings has recognized that a simple inexpensive bearing can add a lot of life to that RTR servo, and eliminate these problems. This is the best “bang for your buck” mod you can make to any Axial RTR vehicle. It is a simple, inexpensive way to upgrade your Axial AS-3 RTR servo.

Remove the servo horn from the servo’s output shaft. Then, remove the servo from the front axle. You will want to unplug the servo from the receiver, just to make the switch less of a hassle. A shot of the servo, and the new 6x10x2.5mm bearing that will replace the bushing.
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Using a 1.5mm driver, loosen up the 4 small screws on the bottom of the servo case.
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You can leave the screws in the case, just make sure they are all loose.
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Set the servo upright so it is sitting on the heads of the 4 screws. Push down on the case and the screws will pop the top cap off. Notice the white bushing on the servo’s output shaft. That is what we will be replacing. If you don’t see it around the output, check the cap of the servo case.
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Bushing removed.
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A side by side shot of the bearing and bushing.
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Install the new bearing in the top cap.
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Reinstall the servo’s top cap and you are done!
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Performing this simple mod will add a lot of life to your AS-3 servo. As mentioned earlier, this is one of the best mods you can make to your RTR Axial vehicle for durability reasons. If you have an old AS-3 servo laying around because it has some slop and you wanted to upgrade. Try installing one of these bearings, and you will have a decent metal gear servo for your spare parts bin.

Link to 6x10x2.5 bearing.
http://www.fasteddybearings.com/6x10x2-5-metal-shielded-bearing-mr106zz-w2-5/

Still not sure you have the confidence to perform this modification? Check out Team Fast Eddy’s video tutorial for a visual step by step “how to”!

Wraith Steering Upgrades

Here are a few tips for upgrading the steering on your Wraith. The stock Wraith steering components are pretty stout right out of the box. But, upgrading to aluminum components will give you a little extra piece of mind when it comes to sweating breakage while out on the trail. Here’s a quick “how to” for upgrading your Wraith’s steering set-up to aluminum components.

A picture of the new parts needed.

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Where’s the beef? All the components needed removed from their packaging. You will only need 8 of the 10 screws in part’s bag AXA115. Some of the self tapping plastic screws will no longer be needed.

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Start by removing the wheels and tires from the front axle.

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Loosen the M3 set screw in the drive hex, then remove it and the drive pin from the stub axle.

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Next remove the 2 screws holding the steer arm on the knuckle.

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Using a 2mm driver, remove the 2 screws that hold the knuckle on the C-hub.

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Now remove the 2 self-tapping screws that hold the C-hub on the axle housing.

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Slide the new aluminum C-hub into place and attach using the existing hardware.

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Remove the bearings and stub shaft from the old plastic knuckle, and install them into the new aluminum knuckle.

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After installing the steel kingpin sleeves into the knuckle, slide the knuckle into place on the C-hub and tighten it down using the new M3x10mm button head screws. Make sure the knuckles are oriented properly, and are attached to the proper side of the axle housing. And as with the stock knuckles, the double captured arms aren’t used.

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Use two more of the new M3X10 screws to re-attach the steering arm to the knuckle. If you are running the stock wheels, you can add some small spacers under the knuckle steer arm in order to take a little of the stock “toe in” out. If you are running our XR10 beadlock wheels, there isn’t much room for this mod.

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Last thing we need to do for this side in re-install the cross pin and drive hex.

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Now repeat the above steps for the opposite side on the front axle.

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And you’re done, time to go hit the local rock pile!!

Wraith Steering Tips

Now that the Wraith’s have been out on the market for a bit. We have had a few people mention that they were getting some bind in the stock steering linkage. So, for this article I will be going over a few simple tips to help smooth out the steering on your Wraith. The biggest culprit for getting steering bind on the Wraith’s is dirt. After a few battery packs off-road dust will work it’s way into your steering and suspension ball studs. Ball studs are the pivot points in any steering or suspension link set-up. The ball studs press into the rod ends, and provide the links the freedom to move as the steering and suspension cycle through their travel. If dirt and debris work their way into the ball studs, it will start to cause bind. Bind in the steering can cause servos to overheat and even burn out, as well as excessive wear in the steering components.

Since there are no super mini micro torque wrenches available for our niche sport, we have to be careful how much force we use to tighten up our suspension and steering links. Especially when is comes to plastic self tapping screws. The Wraith comes with plastic ball studs stock as well. If the screws that pass through them are over tightened, it will distort the ball stud and cause the steering to bind as well as limited overall movement. So, be vigilant in your maintenance schedule, but don’t overdo it when you are checking the torque specs on your plastic self tapping screws. The best thing you can do to help avoid these issues is upgrading to steel ball studs, (Part # AXA1331) which are 100 times more durable then plastic. I am also going to upgrade this Wraith’s steering system with an aluminum servo horn for added piece of mind and strength. Here are a few tips on the conversion.

Here you can see I removed the servo horn from the servo. At this point the linkage should move freely without bind, if it doesn’t, then upgrading the ball studs will fix the issue. Here you can see this one is a little sticky.

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Removing the servo horn revealed that the plastic ball stud in this linkage was in fact crushed down a little.

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To remove the stock ball stud, I use a pair of wire cutters. Squeeze lightly around the neck of the ball stud and pop it out of the steering link.

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Here you can see the old damaged ball stud on the left and the new ball stud on the right.

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Use a pair of pliers to install the new metal ball stud as shown.

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After installing a metal ball stud and aluminum servo horn, you can see the linkage will move freely now. If you still have a little bind, or sticky feel after installing the metal ball stud. Run a couple packs through your truck and everything should seat in and work smoothly after that.

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Now repeat the above steps on the other 3 points in the steering linkage locations, opposite end of the drag link and at the steering knuckles. Then, you should be back in business. Again, if the linkage still feels sticky. Run a battery or two through your truck and the linkage should free up. Sometimes dirt gets embedded in the plastic, so cleaning your steering link holes before installing the new ball studs is a good idea too.

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