Axialfest 2012 Recap

The first annual Axialfest was held this past weekend, June 22 – 24th, in Cisco Grove, CA. This event was known in the past as the “Axial West Coast Championships”, aka AWCC. This year’s event was geared towards “scale adventure” more so than a full on “competition”. While there are many classes to run, and trophies to win, this year’s event had a little different format to it, by offering numerous scale classes to compete in. Brian Parker’s new competition format known as “G6″ is slowly takingĀ  the country by storm. Parker and his group of Recon Crawlers set out to make this event all about driving your scale R/C truck on lengthy adventures. When I say lengthy adventures, I mean it. For example the first stage of the G6 challenge on Friday consisted of navigating 500 gates that were sporadically laid out in the woods surrounding Cisco Grove Campground, the base camp of our adventures for the weekend. These 500 gates are numbered and must be run in consecutive order. Sounds simple enough right? Well, it can be, if you can locate all the gates. Brain and his crew can be pretty creative when it comes to setting courses, and camouflaging gates. And keep in mind there are 3 stages to this G6 challenge, so 500 gates is only part of the 3 day adventure. In the end I believe some adventurists in attendance ran in excess of 1200 gates throughout the weekend. Here’s a run down from the event.

Axial base camp.

The mud pit, which would be used throughout the weekend.

 

Registration on Friday morning.

 

The Terra Cross track.

 

Competitors line up according to class for the start.

 

Brian Parker holds the driver’s meeting before releasing competitors out onto the course.

 

On to the action. A cool Crawlmaro replica made with a Wraith.

 

Brett Carlson from Bulu Productions made the trip down from Oregon to shoot a little video, as well as compete with his Wraith.

 

Driving out of a rollover will save time and penalty points if you don’t have a winch.

 

One of the challenges that had to be performed on this stage was a sled pull.

 

Here you can see the mud depth is keep scale for realism.

 

Teamwork is another key factor to making through all 500 gates. Competitors are allowed to help each other over obstacles if need be.

 

The start of day two’s Ultra Race. This was a class that required you to run the set course as fast as you can. If you are looking for a good fun cardio workout, this is the class for you.

 

The first turn was a bottle neck for the more densely populated classes.

 

Axial’s own Brandon Coonce took the holshot in his custom blue paneled Wraith.

 

Next class hits the ground running. This was the adventurist class if I remember right. This class wasn’t about speed, it was more about adventure. But, a quick start to get ahead of the competition is still a good idea until the group gets spread out on course.

 

Turn one mayhem.

 

Next class to depart for the starting area.

 

Turn one was a great vantage point again.

 

Ty Campbell from Tekin’s custom Wraith build hits the mud pit flying.

 

More turn one action.

 

Not very often you see a Gremlin sporting 54″ tires.

 

After all the classes got underway, I set out on foot with my camera to see what challenges lay ahead for our competitors. First driver I came across was my co-worker Brandon. He had a weird monstrosity strapped to the hood of his Wraith. I asked him as he went by what it was, and all I heard was something about a boat? Confused, I followed him up the trail for a bit until he hit a challenge section of the trail run. This challenge required those carrying kayaks or boats on their vehicles to launch their boats at the designated boat ramp, let the vessel float its way downstream to the designated pick-up zone, then recover your boat and load it back onto your rig before you continue on. Actually turned out to be very entertaining to watch, some boats sank in the “rapids” requiring the owner to tip toe their way out into the stream for a recovery. Here is where Brandon’s previously mentioned monstrosity/camp fabbed raft came into play. Constructed of a 2.2 Ripsaw tire, stock tire foam, Proline roof rack, Proline cooler and a little duct tape, this raft floated down the scale river like a champ!! Everyone was laughing as it floated by us.

 

A few other watercraft making their way downstream.

 

After completing a few hundred gates the trail leads the competitors back to base camp for a run through the mud pit.

 

Cupid’s set-up is looking pretty high-tech these days, he is now apparently sporting a compound bow!!

 

Meanwhile back at our campsite our XR10′s are still covered in shaving cream from the previous night’s “Rock Riot” event. It’s a long story………. click the link below the photo.

A little video of Brandon and I hitting the shaving cream pit first. Brandon had the honors of breaking trail, I am second. Listen to Parker laughing as we go through.

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=474854405861643

 

Our guard dog watched over the Axial RV while we were away.

 

One of my favorite scale vehicles from the weekend.

 

A few random campsites that were set-up properly for the disco themed weekend.

 

Time for some Terra Cross action. The TC races had a little something for everyone. There were classes for the SCX10, Wraith and EXO. Each class had its own variation of the track to run. This was one of the highlights of the weekend for me. It was the definition of backyard racing!!

First up for the heat races were the SCX10s.

 

Next up, the Wraith class.

 

And the EXO heat races were last.

 

Winner of the SCX10 Terra Cross Race was Matt Soileau

 

Start of the Wraith finals.

 

Taking the first Wraith Terra Cross victory was Axial team driver Ryan Gerrish.

 

Start of the EXO finals

 

Steve Brown of Vanquish Products tries to get his RTR EXO out of Ty Campbell’s way. Ty was by far the fastest guy on the track.

 

After all the dust settled, Ty Campbell took the win in the EXO Terra Cross.

 

Congrats to all the winners, you guys earned it! Here are a few highlights from the awards ceremony.

 

The future of our sport.

 

The Hawaii club sent this autographed banner to the event with signatures from the Hawaii G6 thanking Axial for their support. Thanks guys!!

That wraps up the 2012 Axialfestivies. If you can find a way to attend one of these G6 events you won’t be disappointed, especially if you own a scale R/C truck. Don’t forget to pack spare batteries either, because you are going to need them.

Project Wroncho – Wraith axles under an SCX10 chassis

Ever since I saw the first prototype Wraith axles, I have wanted to bolt them up to an SCX10 frame with a Honcho body for that “full width” one ton axle look. Well, I finally had a chance to try and it, and so far it seems like it’s going to be a fun vehicle. The extra width of the Wraith axles make this SCX10 extremely stable at speeds, especially when cornering on any high traction surface. The axles should make this SCX10 a great TTC style rig too, because of the extra width/beef of these new axles. I also have a feeling it would do well in G6 style events too. I haven’t had a chance to take the “Wroncho” off-road yet, but here are a few photos of my set-up. Keep an eye out for action shots and video in the near future.

The overall stance……..wheelbase is right at 13 1/2″.

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The suspension set-up. I had to use various rod ends and links to achieve the stance and wheelbase I wanted. I will probably machine new rear lower links to eliminate the extra spacers at the axle.

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I tried using straight rod ends at first, but the triangulation of the links was too much, and it caused binding. The curved XR10 rod ends are a perfect fit though.

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For the initial mock-up I ran the link/shock mounts on the axle the standard way they arrive in the RTR Wraith. But, my ride height ended up a little too tall for my liking. So, I flipped the link/shock mounts upside down which lowered the overall height just enough for me.

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It’s tough to see, but in order for the driveshafts to clear the upper links as the suspension cycles, I had to put a slight bend in them front and rear.

The rear clearance at full compression of the suspension.

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The front at full compression.

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Mandatory flex shot.

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So far I am really excited about how this build is shaping up. Like I mentioned earlier, keep an eye out for some action shots and video very soon.

Link to build thread on RCC:
http://www.rccrawler.com/forum/axial-scx-10/221956-benders-honcho-now-sporting-wraith-axles.html

Link to action shots:
http://wordpress.axialracing.com/?p=763600000

Link to video:
http://wordpress.axialracing.com/?p=789800000

2011 Axial/MSD Scale Nationals: Top Truck Challenge

The Top Truck Challenge was the last event of the 2011 Scale Nats weekend. To get into this competition you had to be voted in by members of RCCrawler.com. Anyone can submit an entry, but only the top 10 make the cut. This event is held on Sunday every year, and is the most entertaining to witness by far. It’s just fun watching custom built R/C’s go through this grueling torture test. The was no shortage of breakage, or fried electronics this year either. Almost every competitor had to make repairs at some point during the event. Driver’s meeting started at 10am on Sunday, so we all got to sleep in a little. Once the meeting was done everyone headed down to the first obstacle, “The Frame Twister”. Here’s a quick rundown of the day.

Driver’s ask questions about the format before the event gets underway.
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Frame Twister
Team Axial driver Zach Chatelain’s custom Jeep tuber.
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Utah’s Lance Parker and his custom Jeep Brute build.
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More random shots from the first obstacle.
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Colorado’s Patrick Hardesty working his way through.
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Mud Pit
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Ryan Gerrish won the award for “Biggest Splash” in this event.
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Ty Giebel got a little too close to the pit during Ryan’s pass.
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More random shots
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Obstacle Course
Tim Samuel navigates his custom tuber through the course.
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The finish line had a decent jump before it, most guys hit the skinny pedal as they came through.
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A little carnage.
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More random goodness.
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More at the finish line.
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Dean Hsiao on course.
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Sled Pull
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Mini Rubicon
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It didn’t take the kids long to inherit the pull sled for their Honchos.
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Hill Climb
Ryan Gerrish works his way up the hill climb obstacle.
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John Riplinger’s custom Jeep tuber attacking the hill.
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Few more shots from the hill.
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Tank Trap
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And the winners are………
1st John Riplinger
2nd Lance Parker
3rd Ryan Overbye
4th Zach Chatelain
5th Dean Hsiao
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That’s pretty much it for the 2011 Scale Nationals. It was a great weekend, with some awesome competition. We are already looking forward to next year.

2011 Axial/MSD Scale Nationals: Class 2 and Axial Spec Class

Day two of the 2011 Axial/MSD scale nationals featured the Class 2 vehicles and the Axial spec class. Weather was a little better than the day before, rain in the morning, with some light clouds in the afternoon.

Arriving at the comp site, with a caffeine IV.
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Competitors trickle in and line up for tech inspection by about 7am.
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Miscellaneous competitors talk turkey as they try to wake up.
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A few shots from the comp site.
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Random rigs before the show gets underway.
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Ty Giebel from Colorado was the first to run this course with his custom SCX10.
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One of my favorite rigs from this year’s event.
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Hold your line driver, winching was the safest way out on this obstacle.
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NorCal’s Erik Gammon working his custom Toyota build, another one of my favorites.
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One of the Axial spec class courses. Drivers had to negotiate a full course towing the trailer. Sounds easy right? It wasn’t, if you rolled the trailer you got dinged for points. If you jack knifed the trailer you got dinged for points. Last gate drivers had to back down off a rock and through the finish gate. Slow and steady was the key to negotiating that set of gates without any penalties.
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Another spec class course. For this one you had to drive a waterproofed 2.2 Honcho through a wet, technical course with a big dirt hill climb at the finish.
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Wraith spec course was a KOH style course where time was the deciding factor. He who made it through the fastest won. Congrats to Axial team driver Dean Hsiao for posting the fastest time of the day. That boy is good!
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Axial team driver Ryan Gerrish extracting his custom SCX10.
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Back at the shop after day 2 for the awards and raffle. Fellow competitors vote for the various awards that will be given out, like attention to detail, tackiest accessory, best tuber, etc
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Setting up for the raffle and winner announcements.
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Ben and his crew throw shirts and hats out to the competitors.
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The crew is tired, but still rowdy.
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A few more cool custom builds.
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Class 2 winners
1. Luis Muzquiz
2. Lance Parker
3. Jerry Orton
4. Dan Garber
5. Nate Schmidt
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Spec class winners
1. Brett Thorne
2. Aaron James
3. Matt Davis
4. Ben Palmer
5. John Ripplinger
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That wraps up day 2. Stay tuned for the TTC coverage next.

2011 MSD Scale Nationals Spec Class Details

Axial is back again for the 2011 MSD Scale Nats as the title sponsor. This year’s dates are May 20th-22nd 2011.

We are very excited to be a part of this event again, and look forward to being there with our core customers. Last year we tried something a little different by doing a “spec class”. Basically, we donated five RTR Honchos. Four of those trucks were assigned to courses, and those trucks stayed at those courses all day. If you entered the spec class, you had to run the rig that was at each course in bone stock form. This class ended up being one of the most talked about classes all weekend, as it turned into a driver’s class, since no one rig had an advantage over the other. To top it all off, Axial gave the spec class vehicles to the top five drivers in that class when the event was over. So not only did drivers get to treat these rigs like a rental vehicle, they had a shot at keeping one if they placed in the top five.

Well, we are coming back to Montana this year to do the spec class again. Only this year there will be a Wraith on one course, a 2.2 Honcho on another course, a standard 1.9 RTR Honcho on another course and a stock Dingo for the last course. So, instead of driving 4 vehicles that are exactly the same, drivers will have to drive a totally different rig on each of the 4 courses. Should make for an interesting event to say the least, and we can’t wait to see how it all unfolds. Plus, this will be the first time the general public gets a chance to drive a Wraith before they are even available in hobby shops.

So, without any more delay, here is your 2011 spec class line-up. We may have one more twist to add to this as well, but we will keep that a secret until it’s showtime!

Here’s the little “twist” we were talking about last week. All spec class competitors will be required to tow a trailer through the courses with the spec class Dingo. A huge thanks to www.ajsmachine.com for donating this sick trailer to us for use in the spec class this year. I think it will be a great new twist for this class.

Axial SCX10 Dingo with AJS Machine Adventure Trailer for MSD Scale Nationals

Interested in attending? Here’s a link to the MSD Scale Nationals Forum on RCC with all the event info.
http://www.rccrawler.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=145

If you pull into town and are needing any last minute parts, be sure to swing by The Hobby Garage. Ben and Aaron always have a full stock of parts on hand.

The Hobby Garage
2611 North Montana Ave
Helena, MT
(406) 422-1222

Jeepspeed Cherokee Build

Some of you may recognize this build from the June 2011 issue of RC Driver magazine, page 28 to be exact. The guys over there did an article/interview with me about this build and how it came about. Now that the article is out and in circulation, we wanted to do a little update with more details here on our blog. If you want to read the article in RC Driver, this issue is now available at news stands.

If you haven’t seen the article, I built this SCX10 up to replicate a Jeepspeed Cherokee. I wanted to build a scale replica of the real thing using off the shelf parts that you could find at most hobby shops. Most people don’t associate the term “custom build” with the phrase “off the shelf parts.” But, with a little imagination you can build a one off custom truck with store bought goods. This build started life as an SCX10 Dingo, and the chassis/suspension is still relatively stock. Most of the customization went into the body on this particular build, since that is what most people see first. I started with a Pro-line Jeep Cherokee body, interior, scale accessories and their 1.9 Super Swamper SX tires. Since the 1:1 1700 class is limited to 33 inch tires, a smaller 1.9 tire looks the best for this style build.

For this particular article I am going to concentrate on a few of the scale details that went into this build. Aside from the Pro-line goodies, I also used an array of Axial parts on this build as well, like the narrowed Dingo roll cage, Dingo rear bumper, interior detail kit, exterior detail kit, Honcho bumper, Honcho spare tire mount, aluminum scale shocks, 4 link parts tree, light buckets, etc.

First thing we will cover is the scale interior, and what went into it. I decided to use black, orange and silver for my colors on this rig. So the interior was painted predominately black, with silver and orange highlights. Here you can see the narrowed Dingo roll cage sitting in place to sort out the mounting points. I measured the inside of the roof line on the Cherokee body to determine the width I needed first, then cut the center of the roll cage as needed.

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To mount the cage I used Axial’s rubber shock bump stops at the base of the cage. Then, used long M3 screws to tie everything together once the placement was dialed in.

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More interior detail.

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Custom fuel filler. I made this using black fuel line and a Great Planes nitro fuel line plug (Part #GPMQ4166) for a cap. Reamed a hole in the body smaller then the outer diameter of the fuel line, then pressed the assembly into place.

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Next, I started working on the body. First thing I wanted to add was Axial scale fender flares, as most of the Jeepspeed Cherokee’s run a wide fender kit front, and/or rear. I did trim the fender flares back a little to give them more of a high speed look. Body scissors work great for trimming the flares as needed.

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Here’s a little closer shot of the trimmed fender flares. Notice I cut the Cherokee fender wells back until the fender flares were even with the hood.

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Once I moved the fender flares up level with the hood, and trimmed the Cherokee Lexan bumpers off, the front of the fender flares end up fairly short. This left me with no holes to mount the very front of the flares to the body. So, I drilled a hole through one of the “dummy” fasteners molded into the flare, then trimmed the head of the fastener off with an X-acto. Now, I can screw the front of the flares down to the body as needed.

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I had to cut the backside of the fender flares into small pieces in order for it to not distort the body lines when everything was bolted up.

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After installing the fender flares, I installed the interior to see if there were any clearance issues. Notice I had to cut part of the interior away to clear the backside of the fender flares.

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Here you can see the internal roll cage pretty much sits against the roof line of the body, which should help keep the cab rigid during any high speed rollovers.

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Another Pro-line accessory that I added was their roof rack. I installed a few Axial light buckets to customize it a little too.

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Next I needed some bumpers. The stock Dingo rear bumper was a perfect fit for the Cherokee body. But, the front bumper isn’t really a desert style bumper. So, I decided to see if I could use a Honcho bumper instead. In order to give our Honcho bumper a little more of a pre-runner look, I cut the bottom of the wings off. Then, cut the aluminum inserts that fit the wings into small pieces to look like reinforcing gussets. Also added our big round lights and amber lenses while I was at it.

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Once again I mocked everything up to ensure a proper fit. It can be a pain to keep assembling everything, just to tear it down again. But, it’s the only way to get everything exactly where it needs to be. Patience is your friend during these steps.

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Once the roof rack was mounted and everything fit properly, it was time to start working on the paint job. I laid out the design I wanted as true to scale as I could. Then, weaseled my way into Brandon’s office to see if he could cut me some paint mask for the body. Thanks Brandon!

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I just used basic rattle can paint on this build. After masking the windows and paint job, I gave the body a very light coat of black paint. To ensure the paint wouldn’t bleed under my mask, I let this first coat completely dry before I applied anymore paint. A light first coat, that is allowed to dry, is the best insurance for a clean paint job. That first light coat basically seals the paint mask to the body, and doesn’t allow later coats to bleed under.

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Paint is done! I applied the black first, then the silver outline on the scallops, then the orange last. After that I went back and laid down another coat of black. This did 2 things, one it gives the orange paint a “burnt” look so it isn’t so bright. And two, it’s a pet peeve of mine to look inside a Lexan body to see the same color on the inside as the outside. So, I always back my paint jobs in black.

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With the fender flares installed.

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Shot of the scallops on the hood.

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Applied all the stickers and it was time for another mock up.

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The ride height looked a little tall to me, so I made some functional limiting straps out of shoe laces to lower the ride height a bit.

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Last thing I did was install the spare tire and add the other scale accessories from Pro-line.

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The final product……

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New Axial Ripsaw Tires Now Shipping

That’s right! Axial’s new 2.2 scale tire is now available through Axial distributors. The Ripsaw tires (#AX12015) feature a super sticky R35 compound, molded ribbing between the lugs to help keep mud and snow from packing into the tire tread, recessed lugs for additional traction and measure 5.5″ tall. Finish off your next 2.2 scale build with a tire that’s as aggressive as the terrain you drive on.

http://www.axialracing.com/products/ax12015

Video:

Fitting 2.2 Ripsaw tires on your SCX10

Ever since we posted the sneak peek video of our new 2.2 Ripsaw tires, we’ve been getting a lot of questions on fitting 2.2 tires onto our SCX10 line of trucks. Bolting the 2.2 tires and wheels up to the truck isn’t all that difficult, but you will have issues with tires rubbing the bumpers and body. A little trim job to the bumpers and body will fix that though, and give your scale truck a little more aggressive look. For this article I am going to use our RTR SCX10 Honcho. I chose the Honcho because it has a little longer wheelbase then the Dingo TR, which will fit the 2.2 tires and wheels better. The Honcho will be the easiest to modify too, because you will only have to modify the front bumper and body.

Here’s how the Honcho looked before I got started:
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Here’s a few side by side pictures of the two tires:
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Here you can see this same Honcho with the 2.2 Ripsaw tires and wheels mounted, before I started cutting:
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Here are a few more photos highlighting the problem areas. Notice the 2.2 tire hitting the body and front bumper way before the suspension bottoms out:
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First thing we are going to do is remove the front bumper and cut it back so the tires clear it as the suspension cycles. Start by removing the center skid plate from the front bumper:
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Now remove the lights from the front bumper, and pull it off your truck:
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After removing the bumper, take the remaining 2 skid plates out of the bumper as well. Here you can see that I will cut along the edge of the bumper in the area highlighted by my hex driver:
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After I cut the wings off I used an X-acto knife to smooth everything out:
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Reinstall the bumper, lights and center skid:
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Here you can see the tires clear the bumper with ease now, even when the suspension cycles:
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Now, with the body on the chassis, we can check to see how much cutting it’ll take to clear the tires:
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Next, I laid the cut line out on the body with a black marker, so it’s easier to visualize the final cut:
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Cut the body a little less then you think you’ll need, and recheck to see if anything is still rubbing:
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Here you can see the tire is still hitting the body just a little:
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This is how it will looks after the final trim is done:
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Now repeat the last few steps for the other side of the body:
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And you’re done and ready for fun!
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Overall stance after being chopped:
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While this Honcho may not look as scale as it used to, the capabilities gained will far outweigh the slight loss in scale appearance.

How to Waterproof your SCX10

Lately there has been a surge in scale truck competitions. The competitions range from mild trail runs with gates, to full on “Top Truck Challenge” style events. No matter which style event you are into, there is probably going to be one common obstacle at most of these scale events…………………water. As most people know water and electric R/C’s don’t really mix well together. Most electronic R/C’s can be very sensitive to moisture, let alone splashing water and/or snow. But, with some care and a little preventive maintenance driving your SCX10 in wet conditions can be done with no consequences to your electronics, or your wallet. This article is geared towards keeping your electronics dry, even if you completely submerse your SCX10 in water. There is something about driving scale R/C trucks in water, mud and snow that is unbelievably fun. I can’t really put my finger on it, but for some reason it is an absolute blast. So, here are a few tips to help keep you splashing around in your local creek, instead of at the work bench replacing ruined electronics.

For this article I will use a stock SCX10 TR Honcho, that has been modified to run 2.2 wheels and tires. Here’s how it looks before I got started.
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Here’s how it looked after I removed the battery tray. Next I took the cover off the receiver box, then peeled the ESC off the box as well.
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I started with the receiver and simple LED kit. First, I used a little double stick tape to attach the LED controller to the side of the receiver. With it configured like this I will still be able to put everything back inside the electronics box after the balloon treatment. Make sure your wires are somewhat organized too, and are all on one side of the receiver. The wires will exit the balloon through the opening.
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Now grab a balloon and stretch the open end up using both hands.
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While holding the balloon open, use your left over fingers to guide the receiver and LED controller into place.
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Here is how it will look after installing the first balloon.
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Now we will move onto the ESC. I marked the power switch on the ESC with a Sharpee, so I know where the “on” position is. We will be inserting the ESC inside another balloon, and access to the power switch may no longer be available. I personally would cut the switch off and solder the positive and negative leads together. So when you plug your battery in the ESC kicks on automatically. But, there are ways around that if you don’t want to solder.
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To avoid soldering the power switch leads, I just used a Ziptie to ensure the ESC remains on at all times. Depending on how it’s set-up, you may be able to access the power switch right through the balloon.
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After prepping the power switch, I used a little double stick tape on it as well, and attached it to the side of the ESC.
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Here you can see the ESC is ready to be installed inside another balloon.
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Stretch the balloon over the ESC just like you did for the receiver.
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Now grab a second set of hands to help with this next step. Have your second set of hands hold the ballooned electronics at the base of the ESC/receiver and at the end of the balloon. While you grab the neck of the balloon in the center, pull up, and wrap it around itself as many times as you can.
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Now use a Ziptie to hold the neck of the balloon in it’s wrapped state.
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Add a couple more Zipties to either side of the first after, just for piece of mind. Also, we will be installing a second balloon over both the ESC and receiver, so try to keep the first set of Zipties that hold the neck of the balloon close to the actual ESC/receiver. Because the second balloon will be installed over the whole assembly, and you will have to wrap the neck of the second balloon just like you did the first.
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Now, as mentioned in the last step, double balloon the ESC and receiver using the same method. It may seem redundant to wrap the electronics in a second balloon. But, I will gladly spend the extra few minutes and .5 cents it takes to ensure my electronics are 100% safe from moisture. Please keep in mind that you will want to monitor your ESC temps for the first few runs to make sure nothing is going to overheat. If you are geared right, temps shouldn’t be a problem at all. But, if your ESC gets hot under normal driving conditions, you may want to install a smaller pinion on the motor to help eliminate heat.

You can see the receiver fits nicely back into the stock location , after I installed the second balloon.
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Here you can see everything is back together just like the stock set-up. I used double stick tape to re-attach the ESC to the radio box, then added a Ziptie around them both, just to make sure the ESC doesn’t go anywhere.
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Now it’s time to prep the steering servo. Remove the servo horn, then remove the servo from the axle.
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Now remove the 4 screws from the bottom of the servo.
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Remove the top and bottom caps.
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For this step we will use some dielectric grease to stop water from entering the servo through the hole in the top cap.
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Add some of the dielectric grease around the servo’s splined output shaft, on top of the bushing/bearing.
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I also added a little more dielectric grease to the gears just to re-lube them.
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Then reassemble the servo, you should see the grease starting to push out around the servo’s output shaft. Now reinstall the servo on the front axle.
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For an extra measure of protection you can dip the whole servo in Plasti-Dip. It’s a liquid rubber compound that will coat the outside of the servo, and help stop water from penetrating the working internals. While no one here at the Axial headquarters has used this method, or can endorse the use of this product. There are video tutorials on YouTube that show the proper method for using the Plasti-Dip. Also keep in mind if you plan on submersing your SCX10 in water deeper then the center of your headlights, you should install a high quality snorkel first.

One last thing we should mention is that running your SCX10 in water will rust anything that is steel on your truck. Bearings, steel gears, axles shafts, etc will all develop rust if exposed to water. Proper maintenance will be required to keep rust down to a minimum.