SCX10 II Trail Honcho 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD RTR Video Collection

SCX10II_Trail_Honcho_Video Look what’s back, the trail rig that lured so many RC enthusiasts off of the tracks and from backyards to the trails for an off-road adventure. The Trail Honcho again graces the trails, this time with the new SCX10 II platform under the iconic Honcho body. But there is a bit more than meets the eye. The SCX10 II has gone through a few revisions and optimized in a way that still delivers the scale performance enthusiasts desire and now at a price that many will find affordable. The Trail Honcho will get you into the scale off-road scene and the level you take your hobby to is up to you. To get you up to speed on what Youtube’s top influencers are saying about the SCX10 II Trail Honcho, we’ve gathered a collection of videos so you can easily see what these trusted channels have to say about the rig.

Axial Videos

Axial AX90059 SCX10™ II Trail Honcho™ – Hike across Redonda Ridge For the launch, the Axial crew went to great lengths to show you the capability of this new release. The SCX10™ II Trail Honcho™ is the reliable choice for scale trail fun! For the past nine years the SCX10™ has been the staple vehicle platform for scale trail enthusiasts around the world. When it’s you, the trail and your rig, you want the tried, and true. You want real world community tested, hobby shop supported, aftermarket supported with close to ten years of history and scale trail adventures. The Trail Honcho™, built on the SCX10™ II chassis, meets the demands and the rigors of scale trailing miles from home when you need reliability the most! The Redonda Ridge Trail, within the mountains of Big Bear California, is mostly used by off road motorcyclist, and revered as the Malcolm Smith Trail due to it’s technical tenacity. The trail was recently re-visited by one of Axial’s own; part of a crew who had traversed the 9.68 mile OHV trail a few times in the past on motorcycles. The thought came about that it would make for a great SCX10™ proving ground, thus the idea was conceptualized to hike the trail, and put the latest version of the Trail Honcho™ through its paces, to uphold the “Trail Honcho” name by putting it on a “black diamond” trail for full size vehicles. Axial takes toys seriously, plays seriously, and made plans to go the extra mile to showcase the Axial SCX10™ Trail Honcho™ in it’s true, namesake terrain.

Harley Designs

Axial SCX10-2 Trail Honcho RTR AX90059 – First Drive – Pre-Budget Build! Harley Designs has already released a number of videos on the Trail Honcho and detailed  the rig before it was even in his hands in the Budget Build Time! Axial SCX10-II Trail Honcho RTR video. After, he followed up with a first running video during a New Year’s Eve trip. The adventure on the rocks is pretty exciting and filmed from a number of perspectives including some drone shots and backed up with some great music. Harley Designs has also teamed up with Scale Builders Guild for a head to head budget build series on the rig. The number of episodes the Trail Honcho will go through has not yet been announced.

Scale Builders Guild

The Trail Honcho is Back! The Scale Builders Guild drops some knowledge on you about the big changes to the SCX10 II Trail Honcho, first going over the links that so many people are talking about. Mathew of SBG takes and compares an old link to a new link to show the difference between the two. His opinion of the new link? Well, you’ll need to watch it to find out. What we can tease is SBG’s overall opinion: “This is a great entry-level truck to fuel your new RC obsession! It’s got a great price point for an RTR and should be robust enough to tackle any trail.” And finally Mathew goes over a number of other changes to the rig and also talks about the budget build series with Harley Designs, using the Trail Honcho.

Hemistorm RC

LOW BUDGET FUN! – Axial SCX102 Trail Honcho Hemistorm RC dips right into the SCX10 II Honcho and delivers a great overview of the trucks new features and what he likes about the original Honcho. Hemistorm explains that at $329, getting the Axial scale experience with the SCX102 chassis has never been more affordable then it is with the Trail Honcho. He discusses the updates in the axle and link design, along with a the budget friendly Tactic radio. Stiff plastic links, single piece axle housings with a reinforced truss section and the use of the AX10 transmission case offer a solid base, along with all the electronics that we’ve seen proven in the other SCX102 platforms, as the Trail Honcho shares a lot of parts with the other versions, the Cherokees and the CRC JK. His overall opinion? The “Trail Honcho one of the most attractive ready-to-run RC trail trucks.”

Extreme Scale Performance RC

Axial AX90059 SCX10II Trail Honcho UNBOXED! If you like some raw unboxing with some suspension squishing, suspension flexing, tire squishing and even watching someone taking a hit of fresh tire smell, then Extreme Scale Performance has the video for you. CWC goes over all the details from the box to the rig from his side arm cam view. He gives you his deep thoughts and opinions on some of the new parts found on the Trail Honcho SCX10 II platform like the links, axles and transmission set-up. No drive time here, but plenty of detailed honest info.

RC Driver Online

The Honcho Returns! Better & Budget Friendly – Axial SCX10 II Trail Honcho Review This video is a long one folks, RC Driver Online unloads a thorough unboxing video giving you all the details you could possibly want and more about the Honcho. You want to know specifically what it comes with all the way to what changes were made in this specific SCX10 II RTR, it’s here. Then RC Driver goes on to talk about the differences in the Honcho kit in comparison to the two other SCX10 II ready to runs available at this time; the SCX10 II 2000 Jeep Cherokee and the SCX10 II 2017 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited CRC. After that tour, the Trail honcho is taken out for a frigid drive under some bridges in a snow covered park. Then the video is wrapped up with thoughts of the rigs performance. If you want to know everything about the Trail Honcho in one shot, sit back, relax, learn a whole lot and enjoy the drive with RC Driver.

Hiking the Redonda Ridge with an SCX10 Trail Honcho

Hiking the  Redonda Ridge with an SCX10 Trail Honcho

Words & Photos: Rodney “GCRad1″ Wills

Hopefully you’ve read the lead-up stories:
Planning a SCX10 Hike over Redonda Ridge OHV Trail 1W17
Getting There – SCX10 Hike Over Redonda Ridge – Big Bear, California
 Axial AX90059 SCX10 II™ Trail Honcho 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – RTR

All the planning is sorted, now we are about to do this thing! We wake up early, I think my alarm went off at 6:00am. Didn’t sleep that well, I think I was too excited.
Too much planning made for too much anticipation.
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It’s Wednesday Morning, October 25th, and I get myself physically prepared; Altra Lone Peak 3.0 Trail shoes, Stance Training Crew socks and Hammer Nutrition Endurolytes for cramp prevention as its going to be a warm day.
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I load the beloved SCX10 Trail Honcho into my ADV80 and we get ready to depart camp and make our way down to the the start of the trail just past Crab Flats Campground. We will start here (Google Map Link) at the Redonda Ridge 1W17 trail marker sign. Four of us will be walking the trail and John Schultz and ScottG will be taking the two vehicles back to camp awaiting our return to camp later this afternoon – evening.
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Last minute morning bits; I get my water bladder filled and of course I have my Hammer Nutrition Heed pre-mix going!
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John Schultz hooked me up! I have a magnetized hood so I don’t loose my body clips!
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Rather simple and rather simple silly cool! Schultz learned it from somewhere and we will make a little blog about it at a later date.
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Load in the first battery and mark the time of start.
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OFFICIAL START: 9:05am Wednesday October 25th, 2017
Axial Trail Honcho Hike Over Redonda Ridge OHV Trail 1W17 is now underway!!!Redonda Ridge Planning-7
This first portion of trail is actually down hill. Everyone is in good spirits!
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I can’t help it, I shoot photos of everything… even the trees. And the landscape! I love the textures and the colors. I’ve been known to “#textures” on my IG before. I can hear my buddy Jarod DeAnda laughing now, “your and your #texture hashtag.”
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Big Bear is a mix or a transitional point from the desert to the mountains, depending on your location on the mountain, you can get a mix of cactus and pine trees of which we will see both today along ridge route to Big Pine Flats.
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The SCX10 Trail Honcho doing what its suppose to do, trailing along.
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Still working our way down hill.
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The sun is warming up quickly, but luckily we still have some shade as we make our way down to the creek, but once over we are fully exposed and will be in “up hill mode!”
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Trails crossing… should put us right about here on Google Maps.

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Keep on mini truckin’ hehehe That’s funny! I know all the GMC dude’s rock the #TinyTrucks tag. I’m an og Mini-Truckin’ dude! I’m going to see if I can dig that old hat out!
We might upset some folks… hehehe
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BRAAAP! off the air craft landing strip shrapnel – the OG Sand Ladder aka Marston Mat. Know your overland-spec history yo! Look it up!
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We are almost to the creek crossing, more like stream crossing, but it is coming up soon.Redonda Ridge Planning-28
I’m usually the one hauling the video camera on these missions so it’s a bit strange for me to see my colleagues carrying the gear.
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It’s been at least a month since my previous crossing and the water level is going down quickly.
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Anthony Rivas got roped into hiking this trip with us and he is doing what he does best, directing some social media shots!
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Hey look! It’s not me on the vid-cam, it’s Scott Roberts doing the video camera action! While most people don’t see or know much about this man right here, he has worked here at Axial with me since 2011. Everything you see visually from Axial basically comes from this man or at least across his desk.
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We crossed over it at the creek crossing, the PCT runs along it through here making yet another appearance in my face! It keeps calling me… But not a full blown thru-hike, maybe just the SoCal weekend section hiking…
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The SCX10 Trail Honcho looks down on the PCT like, “I got this!”
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Who is a fan of desert tan, green eggs and ham mixed with DJ Red Alert.
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Since we left the creek crossing it has become very apparent that THE ASCENT IS ON!
The trail surface to this point has been mostly course sand mixed DG based.
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But as we continue on and up, rocks are starting to litter the trail.
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Also too, after the creek crossing, we are out of the tree cover and exposed to the sun.

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The crew said there was suppose to be a picnic table set up at this GPS point location. Something about pre-paid Amazon air drone delivery service…
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I keep on trucking as I want to get the SCX10 Trail Honcho into rockier conditions!
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The crew finally gives up in protest about the picnic table. “We are canceling our PayPal payment!” The sun laughs and turns up the temperature and add some incline for good measure.
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See! Cactus… on the edge of the forest!
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At the one shade spot…
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We see deer tracks.
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Little ones…Redonda Ridge Planning-51
Hey guys, where you at?
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Carrying on our climb dance!
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Climbing… It’s what the SCX10 Trail Honcho eats for breakfast.
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Climbing… It’s what the SCX10 Trail Honcho dream about before breakfast. Redonda Ridge Planning-59
Climbing… It’s what the SCX10 Trail Honcho does at high noon.
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Climbing… It’s what the SCX10 Trail Honcho does just for fun!
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We make the first major climb for what seems like two hours straight…
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but we finally reach a little plato of earth… Redonda Ridge Planning-67 Redonda Ridge Planning-68
POSER SHOTS! Scroll back up three images…. The guys are asking if the trail goes up over those hills.. “The trail looks like it goes over…” I ignore or I think I said, “yea, naa, I think it cuts around to the right out of sight… Time to roll!”
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From our moment of flat perch, we get to see down this little canyon and its cool to see the small batches of trees. Feels like some wilderness to me!  Redonda Ridge Planning-71
“Therezzz GOLD IN DEM DAR HILLS!!! FOOLS GOLD YO!!!” I gotta’keep the spirits high!
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It’s cool to see the terrain change.
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More #texture change.
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I think this is my favorite shot of the trip. I saw the setting as I was walking up to the crest, stopped, snapped one photo and said, “Yep! Leave it chance and see how the “film” comes out!” Came out all right…
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As the SCX10 Trail Honcho takes in the view, I check the spot to see what it looks like from the front. It’s not as cool of a shot but see that trail we are coming up! Yes sir, we are doing this thing!
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I circle back around to verify the animal footprints. Small one here, but I did see some larger “kitty cat” prints earlier, most  likely a healthy bobcat.
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The Axial SCX10 Trail Honcho is its proper surroundings.
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Trail Honcho bossing the moto trail, but the gnar lay ahead.Redonda Ridge Planning-83
I nicknamed this “scary bush.” Especially if we was coming through here at night.
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The tree is still wearing it’s charred skin from the Butler Peak fire of which I think was back in 2007.
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Did I ever tell you that I actually like shooting photos? But just look at that trail! It’s an “ALL BRAAAP!” section! But wait…
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Now we are getting into some gnar! It’s not easy to get a 2D photo to show the dynamic perspective of hills and their steepness, but take note of Scott Roberts walking ahead, you get a little since of the angle here.
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Maybe this will give you a perspective… Rest stop! SR & Rivas taking a breather, because they can see what lays ahead… ANOTHER HILL!Redonda Ridge Planning-91
The Trail Honcho is upholding it’s SCX10 heritage and just eats up each mile regardless of steepness.
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Meanwhile the steepness is eating up my crew. “Look SR, we have to climb that hill, that other hill behind that and then that other one way back there…”
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Kinda’ spectacular out here!
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Interesting how the cross section view of this tree’s rings looks like four trees in one.
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The SCX10 Trail Honcho just churning out the climbs.
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This trail has obviously been here for a while and been well “knobby traveled” but you have to wonder, who did it first? Who cut this trail? Was it an Indian foot path before? One day I need to stop into Malcolm Smith Motorsports and ask Malcolm directly as this trail is called the Malcolm Smith Trail. But there is very little historical information about this trail online.Redonda Ridge Planning-99
Same photo as the one preceding this one, but I wanted to show the ridge of which we traveled. We’re kinda’ out here! Yes, civilization is just over the mountain the in the background, but your still out here… We haven’t seen anyone else all day… and I like that.
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The SCX10 Trail Honcho takes the hard line just for fun I however will walk the easy path.
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More gnar please.

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The SCX10 Trail Honcho FINALLY runs out of gas! It would… just feet from a nice shady flat area.
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Good thing I have my Schizzle-magnets! I’m a fan! Thanks John!
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Battery #2 loaded and battery #1 marked with the elapse time.Redonda Ridge Planning-108
Just a few more feet and my view looks like this and I join the crew in the shade.
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While I’ve been self-fueling all along, we take a static moment to enjoy our nutrition bars.
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Time to roll!
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With another crest of a hill reveals another view!
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And then more climbing!!!
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While spectacular, the views keep showing those climbs… Redonda Ridge Planning-116
Here you get a little sense of the climb as you can see the crew pushing on.
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I like this shot! I think it shows a bit more of the hill but the view is spectacular!
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But the climb has a summit and a summit reveals more.. See that little trail thread? Talk about onion layers! Redonda Ridge Planning-122
We take a moment in the shade.
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I know you guys are on the Altra Trail Running shoe tip, but are you on the Trial Gator tip? I’m diggin my shoe gators! As goofy looking as they are, they’re total function! With the small gravel-DG-dirt, the gators are perfect for keeping all that stuff out of my shoes!
Get some!

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SCX10 Trail Honcho is back in the trail saddle.
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The sun is starting to throw the long shadows…Redonda Ridge Planning-125
The team is working to push themselves forward as elevation and the rate of steepness has not given in!
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We start to get into another step section, but its been steep all along. I guess it’s more like a steep chute.
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ou sorta’ get a sense of steepness from this view, but regardless I’m just shooting it for the view, the memory, the way the sun is flaring.
Just as I drop the camera back to my side, I’m having to get after this little section. I actually start to wonder if I can actually make this section! I won’t say I am nervous yet as I know I can trail blaze the SCX10 Trail Honcho around if I have to, but it will be limited space to do so. I stay in the trough or chute of a trail and work the rig through the boulder and then in the deep heavy granular sand or DG – decomposed granite. The combination of having to use wheel speed to push up hill in the DG while also the tires dig down and find bite on the rocks below… I hear it… Wait, what? I don’t want to hear that!!!
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After we diagnose the issue, Tony takes my tools and jumps into action so I can
document the wrench action.
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Again, dig the magnet trick as we can drop the screws here on the underside and the body clips are on the top side.
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As suspected, idler gear gone fishing for the afternoon.
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We fish out what debris we can in preparation to install a new gear.  Redonda Ridge Planning-128g
We install a metal idler gear Mr. AX31585 Redonda Ridge Planning-128h
Field repair is almost complete!
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Buttoning it all back together and we will be back in action in moments!

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Now we are back in action and started where we pulled off and it’s the start of
the nasty climbs!
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As you can see, there is a cleaner easier path to take, but what is the fun in that?!
I came here to put the rig through its paces on the rugged trail of the Redonda Ridge.
I could have just stayed home and drove circles around in the parking lot, but that is not my idea of fun! Being out here is fun, while it is both grueling on my body and the SCX10 Trail Honcho. But it’s worth it as it’s an additional layer of testing.Redonda Ridge Planning-131
These climbs also showcase some scenic views!
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Photos never seem to capture the true steepness of a hill, but looking at ScottR and Rivas as they make their way up, shows a bit of how steep this section truly is. When I begin to question if I will be able to drive a section due to the steepness, I really start looking creative driving lines!  Redonda Ridge Planning-134a
When you see motorcycle parts on the ground, you know its a tough section.
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But we are “still not out of the woods” yet, insert “rocks” in place of woods. Yes, we are still in the woods, with rocks strewn about! hehehe   Redonda Ridge Planning-138
Rivas making his way up. The team has come to the conclusion that there is no end in hills, they just keep rolling at us. Only to discover around each bend, more hill!
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And more hill it is!
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The lighting from the sun is just awesome! We are within the “golden hour” and I could sit on this hillside and shoot till dark!
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But, I only snap off a couple and keep moving as I knew we have at least a mile or two further to go and we will be hiking in the dark.
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The sun is is about to drop behind the mountains and the ground bush on our mountain is blocking some of that light, but we finally made it through that section! Redonda Ridge Planning-143  Redonda Ridge Planning-145
You just want a lounge chair and a big dinner as this is the perfect wide-screen!
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But we must keep going, the SCX10 Trail Honcho marches on!Redonda Ridge Planning-147
Another big boulder garden! Who plants these things?!
Who would want these things to grown like this?
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The SCX10 Trail Honcho makes no worries of such matters and see’s only the playground in mother nature’s garden of rocks.  Redonda Ridge Planning-150
WHAT?! A moment of downhill or even flatness is a happy moment!

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Only to be defused by another uphill climb as Tony makes more reveling with his headlamp that we will be engulfed by darkness on the backside of this climb.
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Everyone is beat tired, but the view is magical.
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Battery change time!
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There is both excitement and angst in the air from the crew. The hills are behind us, the darkness is ahead of us.

Maybe the last climb? Redonda Ridge Planning-172
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Hike team headlamps streaking by.Redonda Ridge Planning-174
The SCX10 Trail Honcho awaits the last of the team to pass for the final view of darkness and the final decent to the trail gate at Crab Flats. The end is near, just ahead down a dark mountainside with ZERO moon light. We make our way down and ScottG is awaiting us, with lights on in the rig, we can see how much further we have and the excitement builds for the team!  “GET US OFF THIS TRAIL!” is what a think I heard! Redonda Ridge Planning-181
WE ARE HERE – WE ARE HERE – WE ARE HERE!!!Redonda Ridge Planning-184
We extract the third and final battery out of the SCX10 Trail Honcho and mark the times.

OFFICIAL FINISH: 7:30PM Wednesday October 25th, 2017

Total mileage: 9.68 mile / Total Elapse Time: 10-hrs & 25-mins
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This trip epic, awesome, fun, grueling and was a big learning curve!
The crew will forever remember this trip! Redonda Ridge Planning-185
That’s a wrap! Spark Arresters Required!

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Back at camp, ScottG aka “BKGriller” makes HAMBURGERS for the HUNGRY!!!

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[L2R] Tony Phalen (cam-2), ScottR (cam-1), Rodney Wills (SCX10 Pilot), John Schultz (team basecamp & rig prep), Anthony Rivas of Rivas Concepts (guest & social documentary) ScottG (team basecamp & trail transpo & chief).

See the rig:
Axial AX90059 SCX10 II™ Trail Honcho 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – RTR

Planning a SCX10 Hike over Redonda Ridge OHV Trail 1W17
Getting There – An SCX10 Hike Over Redonda Ridge
Axial AX90059 SCX10 II™ Trail Honcho 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – RTR
About the Author: Redonda Ridge Planning-191
Rodney Wills may not have been born with a silver spoon in his mouth, but he was more than compensated for it by being able to grow up behind the wheel. At eight years old he started driving heavy equipment on his uncle’s farm. Flouting child labor laws, his uncle would put him to work; he would get him started and jump off the tractor, and have Rodney cut and plow fields. The uncle found Rodney a willing employee. Now, while he did not engage in any tractor races, the seed had been planted (literally); the passion for driving already raced through his veins.

Later on in Alabama, Rodney would drive his father’s old pickup truck. As young teenagers sometimes do, he would sneak the truck out to splash in the mud on the local country back roads. Rodney did not limit himself to four-wheel rides, however. Motorcycles were always apart of family life and Rodney had started riding at age five. Racing came at age six on the dirt oval flat track at Talladega. Trail riding was an everyday thing in the backyard woods and local mountains.

Magazines would introduce Rodney to skateboarding and then BMX in 1977. Normal by today standards but then in rural Alabama, Rodney was way ahead of his peers. Just like his hobbies, his life went in the order of Art, Music, and Cars. His passions led him to the California College of Arts and Crafts after two years at the Atlanta College of Arts and Crafts. After achieving a bachelors degree of art in graphic design, Rodney went on to work ten years in the snow, skate and surf industry through his art, working for the famous O’Neill wetsuit company. Next came music as the art director for the car audio speaker manufacturer Image Dynamics. That led to Rodney starting the import car culture lifestyle magazine, TMRm’zine [1996-2000]. This magazine put the “lifestyle” label on the import market that has now grown to enormous proportions in the automotive industry. For the next 10-years Rodney worked in magazine publishing. During a meeting between colleagues, Wills was helping an event promoter make his event better, which lead to a more in-depth connection to the R/C industry pulling Rodney in to work for HPI Racing [2006-2010]. Since 2010, Rodney has worked for Axial as Global Marketing Director coming up with wacky ideas such as this.

AXIALFEST 2015 Pre Drivers Meeting

AXIALFEST 2015 Pre Drivers Meeting

Words and Photos by Matt Soileau 

1 Welcome to the AXIALFEST 2015 pre-event drivers meeting. Think of this as one of the primers behind getting everyone ready to roll (no pun intended) on the AXIALFEST RECON G6 Challenge.  If you have attended a RECON G6 event before, these key points will sound familiar and a good refresher. If this is your first time, these key points will be valuable information to keep you on the right track during the RECON G6 at AXIALFEST 2015.

First, lets start with the SCORE CARD for this year, we have a brand new one for the 2015 edition of AXIALFEST.


The new AXIALFEST 2015 SCORE CARD looks a little different for those who are familiar with previous ones.  There are colored boxes for each stage section at AXIALFEST 2015.  Make sure you mark in the proper location for each section of the stage. *Note that the Winch Penalty is for human powered winching only*  If you have a powered winch on your vehicle or another vehicle pulls you out, there is no penalty.  There are also locations for stamps and punches, including a place to take notes.  Be keen on taking notes of anything out of the ordinary or unusual. We will have a separate blog post on all the details behind the SCORECARD to follow soon.


Also known as, No Hand of God. The No HOG rule means; Thou shall not touch your rig in an unscale fashion.  If you roll your rig over while on trail, get your rig uprighted using a winch, tow strap, or assistance from a fellow RECON G6er.


When using a tow strap solo, use it in a scale winching fashion.  This means pulling like the strap is attached to a winch.  Flipping the truck over with your hand or foot is a violation of RECON G6 No HOG rules. Remember, the scale gods will be watching. Please don’t do the infamous Helicopter Winch were a driver uses their tow strap to lift and carry their rig to a new location.  If you are lifting the tow strap up and or if your rig is in the air, you are doing it wrong. Think scale… would you put a winch line or tow strap at the top of a tree to extract your vehicle?

There will be a lot of trail markers around the Cisco Grove Campground.  Don’t touch them with your rig, only drive through them. Touching them will result in a time penalty.  Also, make sure you drive through them in the proper direction, which is passing through them with the numbered markers on the right side of the vehicle – PASSENGER SIDE.


Please do not be tempted into taking trail markers, signs with your favorite number or any signs as souvenirs. Missing trail markers ruins the experience for remaining G6ers, as they will not have a proper trail to follow. They seem so simple and inexpensive, but they are bloody expensive to create, time consuming to put together and will lead to increased fees at following AXIALFEST / RECON G6 events. Simply put, PLEASE don’t take the signs.   :)


At AXIALFEST / RECON G6 events, water is referred to as “clear dirt.” Rigs may be driving through a fair amount of it at AXIALFEST. The general rule, water will be scale deep, which roughly translates to just above the axle.  Waterproofing your electronics is not mandatory, but highly recommended.  Drive smart and water should never be an issue, but make a slight error near water and your electronics could let out the magic smoke. Patience and looking at the trail as a chess game will usually reveal an easy path. Same time, as your rig is traveling in and around “clear dirt” your shoes will also be seeing the same terrain. Please wear appropriate outdoor footwear and or shoes you do not mind thrashing! Think about this before you wear your nice white DC’s out on trail.


Yes, we will forever be inspired by the famous Camel Trophy Challenges and it has become a tradition at AXIALFEST to also include a deep water crossing. This can be achieved by building and using a device to float your truck safely from one side to the other.  Fortunately, flotation devices do not need to be carried on course.  They’ll be collected and staged awaiting for your arrival at the water crossing. Those without flotation devices can drive the long way around or take a ferry ride if you are lucky enough to catch it. Don’t forget to bring “good will fair! for the ferry-operator!” AND THE BIGGEST “DON’T FORGET”, turn off your rig’s ignition and radio while your pride and joy is floating across the water on a makeshift homemade raft. Yes, it happens! Just watch the 2013 AXIALFEST video and note the 13:20 mark of the video as the driver explains how his rig went into the drink:


Driving Challenges are generally roped off with a brightly colored ribbon. If you come to an obstacle that is cordoned off with ribbon, do not walk within the trail section as that section is for the passage of the rig only. No driver / pedestrian traffic within the boundaries.

DSCF0355You must walk outside the designated Driver Challenge Section. If you drive your rig into a situation requiring assistance within this Driver Challenge Section it will result in a hefty time penalty, so drive smart. Not fast, not wild. SMART = PATIENCE! Think CHESS MATCH! It’s you and your rig against Parker and his trail!

With so many drivers expected for AXIALFEST, there will be seven different trails to challenge the drivers.  Each trail will be labeled A, B, C, D, E, F and G. At check in, drivers will be given their starting trail assignment, AKA: Run Group. Drivers will complete the stage they were assigned and then proceed, alphabetically, through all the remaining stages. For example: If you are assigned to start the event on Trail C, you will complete C, followed by D, E, F and then over to A, and finish on B. Also, Trail G is for ULTRA classes only. So if you are running in an either ULTRA 1.9 or ULTRA 2.2 you will run Trail G and A and B and C and D and E and then F. And maybe back to G AGAIN… Can you say power bars & electrolyte mix!


There is a high possibility of 100+ drivers starting all at the same time as you. There will be many drivers on each of the trails and crowds are to be expected at bottlenecked obstacles. Patience is going to be your best friend here. Relax and enjoy the day, get to know your trail neighbor and offer assistance. It is your option to take the Trail Marker penalty and move on or practice your selfie stick and revel in the camaraderie experience embraced within the RECON G6 family. Remember, It’s you and your rig vs. Parker and his trails. #AXIALFEST2015 #RECONG6 #AxialAdventures


Helping each other on the Trails in not mandatory, but highly recommended.  Don’t feel obligated to lend a tow strap or parts or tools to others, but remember that you may need some assistance down the trail.  The golden rule applies to AXIALFEST etiquette; Treat others how you would like to be treated. The Trail Gods such as Mark Smith could be watching over us.

Who is Mark Smith?
Mark A. Smith was a towering figure in 4×4 history. He pioneered the sport as one of the first drivers to traverse the mighty Rubicon Trail. He founded Jeep® Jamboree USA and brought the wonders of responsible off-roading to the world. He worked with Jeep brand engineers for decades, helping to improve the off-road capabilities of all Jeep vehicles. He has had a significant influence on everything the Jeep brand stands for. The Jeep family salutes Mark and all that he did for us. His spirit will live on.

17 Slower drivers please allow faster drivers to pass. You may hear, “ULTRA DRIVER COMING THROUGH!” If you do, please stop, pull over and let these drivers pass. ULTRA DRIVERS, THIS DOES NOT GIVE YOU THE RIGHT TO BUMP – KNOCK or DRIVE OVER over any ADVENTURIST! They are not in your Ultra-Race! They are there to smell the butterflies, so please me mindful of their experience as well! Trail gods and note pads will be in action and you don’t want this infraction reflected upon you.

Obstacles: It’s ok to attempt to overcome an obstacle without winching or strap assistance, but be mindful of the trucks behind you. The general rule is to try an obstacle 3-times before letting the next person attempt it.  If a line is piling up, pull over and let others pass.  You can resume your persistence once the obstacle frees of traffic. It is your option to take the Trail Marker penalty and move on.

Trail repairs are allowed.  It is totally fine to pick up a broken rig to repair.
This is not a violation of the NO HOG rule. But please read the fine print:
11Please move your rig out of the way of others passing through on the trail.  *You may want to make a note on your score card as to what trail you are on, trail markers you are between and what is the issue. Then make the required repair out of the way of others and then return your rig to the exact location and position it was in when you picked it up.  For example: If you break a mechanical part, pick up your rig and go make the repair. This could include a trip back to camp if you do not have the part with you. When you are finished, put your rig back down exactly where it was.  But, if you rolled your rig upside down and the result was broken mechanical issue, you will need to place the rig back in it’s upside down position at the place of incident and proceed to get yourself unstuck or right sided up. Its all apart of the experience. *Remember that part about making a note first before you started working on your rig? This information will be helpful to yourself if you have to make a trip back to camp. You will have a note to remind you what trail & section you will re-start your journey.

Keep your eye out for things that look out of the ordinary.
5There are often toy animals, toy cars, dolls, gold coins, poker chips, and etc. littering the trail. Sometimes they are easy to spot, sometimes they are a little more difficult to spot.  If you find such, make a note on your score card noting [1] What you found. [2] The Trail Letter [3] Between what Trail Markers the object was found. [4] Place item/s on your rig and bring them back to G-Central. Most times you will be rewarded with a time bonus.  Since this is AXIALFEST, Trail Treasures may mean a prize back at G-Central.  Keep your eyes peeled.

As stated before, the RECON G6 Trail’s at AXIALFEST can be quite long.  Expect a walk of several miles long and several hours in length.  You will need to make sure you have everything with you on the trail.  Highly recommended is a backpack with snacks, water, parts, and tools.  You don’t want to be two miles from camp and need a screw driver.  That’s a long walk to make a trail repair.


And remember, Finishing A RECON G6 IS LIKE WINNING A RECON G6!
Especially at AXIALFEST 2015!  Do Work, Drivers!

Make sure you bring a camp chair and a stick of firewood to Axialfest 2015.  Camp chairs and firewood is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED at the Awards Ceremony.  We recommend your comfiest camp chair.  There are so many prizes and awards, the awards ceremony will not be over in 30 minutes.


RECON G6 – Birthday Bash 3


RECON G6 Presents
Birthday Bash 3
Wingfield Park, Reno, Nevada
December 7, 2013

It’s still hard to believe the RECON G6 is three years old. It seems both older and newer at the same time. On one hand, it seems like just yesterday that I drove in the first RECON G6 at Mayberry Park, and yet it also feels like I have been doing this all my life. I think the camaraderie and family like atmosphere just makes the RECON G6 feel like home.

In celebration of the success of the RECON G6, the Birthday Bash has always been a thank you from RECON G6 to all the drivers that make the RECON G6 what it is. This past year the RECON G6 went nationwide and international with events in Florida, Missouri, Colorado, Arkansas, Oregon, California, Nevada, and Ontario, Canada.

The RECON G6 Birthday Bash has also partnered with a couple local charities, so drivers were encouraged to bring toys for children as well as nonperishable food items for the local Sheriff’s Christmas on the Corridor toy drive and Evelyn Mount Community Outreach food pantry.

In the past, Mother Nature has been kind to the RECON G6ers with mild winter weather. This year Mother Nature had a special treat for the G6ers, snow and freezing temperatures. I was a bit worried. I wasn’t worried about fun because this would not be the first snow covered G6. There was a RECON G6 a couple years ago that the RECON G6 crew shoveled miles of snow paths for. So, I knew that the RECON G6 crew would have a path cleared for the drivers. What I was worried about was attendance.  I was afraid the snow roads and frigid temperatures would render the turnout low. I’m not sure why I was worried. G6ers are a special breed. There were already many cars in the parking lot. I spotted some out-of-towners who braved the roads to attend.


This guy made the trip down from Oregon. He was the first one I spotted as I parked.


There’s a California. Looks like he saw quite a bit of snow on the pass over.


Idaho, too. This family came overland ready.


I also spotted Old Red Rocket in the parking lot. I wonder what time she got there?


The Truckee River looked a little frigid. I wouldn’t want to fall in there today.


When I turned the corner, I was a little surprised to see how many G6ers were already registered and lined up. They had their kits decorated in the Birthday Bash spirit.


Presents, check. Christmas Tree, check.


Someone went crazy with the pipe cleaners and foamy stickers.


I little ribbon can really dress up your JK in a hurry. All it takes is a little imagination.


I spotted my first RECON G6 Jeep Wrangler in the wild. This one was fitted with snow chains. These G6ers were ready for the snow.


This sweet Pajero has a G6 certified sticker on the bumper, but I think it is a mall crawler. I never saw it get dirty.


Why is this guy smiling like this?



Because the RECON G6 crew set up a warming tent with a huge mushroom heater in the middle. This was a popular spot to come warm up and trade driving stories.


Adventure IQ brought up his family. They shared their cookies, heater, and best of all….


…the most delicious, soul warming spiced apple cider I have ever tasted. It was AWESOME.


Look who made the 5,000 mile trek from Austria for the FOURTH TIME, Daniel Siegl. What’s your excuse for not attending a RECON G6 event?


Jesse registers while trying to work around all the toys and food all the G6ers donated.


I see canned food and a snow saucer, the perfect present for the day.


A whole family of Happy Birthday Heads.


Not a thief, just trying to keep the face from freezing.


The coolest RECON G6 Jeep Wrangler I saw from KlingOn RC. This thing was sweet looking.


Even his interior was dialed.


New for 2014 is the Expedition Class. Trailers and 6x6es finally get their own class. This guys was a little eager to get it started.


That’s more kits than I expected to see on a 7* winter day.


The trail looked ready. Drivers were just waiting for the Parker to arrive.


There he is. Listen up drivers. This is a special RECON G6, there are…..


I hope they listened to instructions. I headed out to set up for photos.


Mandatory National Anthem.


Now we’re off. I wonder how those chains will work.


Pretty good, so far.


The walking warms the body.


The first section was down some snow covered boulders.


Good to see the Ridgeline getting some wheel time.


Snow makes for some slow driving, so lines were pretty common on the first lap.



Those leaves will either create traction or remove traction, only time will tell.


I loved this Bronco.


I hope those presents don’t fall off the back. He should put those in the cab.


Looks like those leaves remove traction.


The Great Pham coming through in the second wave.


Watch out for trolls under the bridge.


I spot the Daniel Siegl out there.


These ducks heard a commotion and went to investigate.


It was the G-Train coming through.


Down the Urban Highway.


Over to the movie theater. A patron asked what was happening. They wondered why all these people were out walking their radio controlled cars.  I gladly explained the RECON G6 to them.


These steps were easier to go down than up.


This poor sport was pouting because his parents didn’t buy him the RECON G6 Jeep Wrangler for Christmas.


Approaching Flop Corner.


Why is it called Flop Corner?


Oh, that’s why.


Good thing G6ers are helpful and quick to lend a strap.




Another RECON G6 Jeep Wrangler making things look easy.


It had to strap this poor Cherokee through TM20.


Snow required large doses of skinny pedal at times.



KlingOn RC RECON G6 Jeep Wrangler flexing its muscles.


Nice hat, Tim.


Wraiths had to be a little more cautious on this ledge.


You needed a little speed to make it up this rock face. This Wraith had plenty.


This mud truck turned into a snow truck.


Well, that’s one way to get the snow of your kit.

New Awards: Drivin Durty, drivers that don’t have licenses. AKA under 15 class



Drivin Divas, The Lady Class.



OG Drivers of the Day.



Of the Year Awards.  Drivers who Shined All Year Long by exhibiting the Spirit of the RECON G6.




The BIG Winner.


The other winners.


Thanks again Axial and the RECON G6 crew for a great year. I know that 2014 will be even more spectacular. Check for the full list of events in 2014.

Axial RECON Ultra4 G6 2014 at King of the Hammers


Axial RECON Ultra4 G6 at King of the Hammers

Axial Racing & RECON Crawlers has brought r/c enthusiasts Big Events since 2007. The Axial West Coast Championships started the r/c crawling “Big Events” and was the first to ever have qualifying rounds and LCQ’s. Axial Racing and RECON Crawlers teamed up again to bring r/c enthusiasts and their families an r/c genre that has swept the World, known as the RECON G6. The RECON G6 is more than an event, it’s a Life Style. The King of the Hammers (KOH) and Ultra4 racing is also a life style and they are going to be getting their R/C scaler fix, in The Axial RECON G6. This is the last event on the 2014 KOH schedule starting at noon on Saturday, if you own an Axial R/C, come out and get your fix in this 2nd annual Axial RECON Ultra4 G6.

Axial RECON Ultra4 G6 Intel

2014 Axial RECON G6 Adventure Series Event #1

When – February 8, 2014
Where – King of the Hammers (exact location TBA soon)
Why – Because we’re G6′n and everyone knows it.
Drivers Meeting / Stage line up to start at high noon or 12pm.
Stage Start following the National Anthem. (12:30+/-)
G-Fee – $25.00
15 and Under – $15.00

Bringing a power bar or Monster Ultra Zeros to G-Central is not mandatory, but highly recommended.

-A tow strap is mandatory. This can be a lanyard or shoe lace.
-5 scale items are mandatory. This may include side mirrors, seats, sleeping bags, etc.
-5 medieval scale items are not mandatory, but highly recommended. This could be a sword, shield, hat etc.
-Running the number and name of your favorite Ultra4 racer is not mandatory, but highly recommended.
-A spare tire is not mandatory, but highly recommended.
-A winch is not mandatory, but highly recommended.

If you missed the first ever Axial RECON Ultra 4 G6, don’t miss this one. There will be more of everything, including all the new 2014 RECON G6 classes and awards.

Classes –

- 1.9 Adventurist Class – This class is for all scalers using 1.9 size wheels & tires. It doesn’t matter your driving ability or your truck’s capability, everyone and every truck is capable of finding adventure here.

- 2.2 Adventurist – This class is for all scalers using 2.2 size wheels & tires. If you like big tires, this is your class. The 2.2 Adventurist will face bigger challenges, and their driving ability and scaler capability will be tested, as well. The 2.2 Adventurist has become a premiere class in the RECON G6.

- Expedition Class – “NEW” for 2014 and available at the Birthday Bash G6, – This class is for 6×6’s and scalers with trailers. This class will have more mandatory scale items and is geared towards the builders who enjoy the challenges of driving a 6×6 Truck or towing a trailer. Wheel and tire size are restricted to 1.9’s. Tires must be scale licensed or scale knock-offs. Expedition 6×6’s and G-Rides with trailers will each be awarded.

- RECON Ready Wrangler Modified Class – “NEW” for 2014 and available at the Birthday Bash G6, – This class is for the new Axial Jeep Wrangler G6 kit. Drivers are allowed to run any motor / esc combination, servo of your choice, any 1.9 tire / wheel combination, & battery of your choice. Rear steer and dig are not mandatory, but highly recommended. A winch and Pull Pal are not mandatory, but highly recommended. No AR60 or Wroncho style axles. The Stock body, frame rails, transmission case, and cage must be used. Stock or upgraded parts for the Axial SCX10 may be used, including transmission cases, axle housings, drivelines, steering knuckles, C’s, etcetera. Drivers finding adventure in the RECON Ready Wrangler Modified Class are eligible for a new kit & swag package.

- RECON G6 Driving Diva of the Day Award – “New” for 2014 & available at the Birthday Bash G6,- The best 1.9 Adventurist and 2.2 Adventurist female driver will be receive an award for their efforts.

- RECON G6 Driving Durty Award – “New” for 2014 & available at the Birthday Bash G6. This award will be awarded for the top 1.9 Adventurist & 2.2 Adventurist 15 years or younger.

- Event Credentials and Finishing Tags – “New” for 2014 and available starting February of 2014, – All drivers that pre-register for a RECON G6, will receive event specific credentials to commemorate the RECON G6 they attend and all G6’ers will receive finishing tags upon completing the RECON G6 stage, because “finishing a RECON G6 is like winning a RECON G6.

Bring the Family. Bring your friends. Bring your sense of adventure. The 2014 Axial RECON Ultra4 G6 will have you on the edge of your scale adventure seat. Join us for all the King of the Hammers racing action, including racing action on Axial Blvd. Not only will there be an Axial Adventure trail, but new for 2014, Ultra 4 racing action. Do you like bragging rights? Do you like swag? Do you like being the fastest driver of the day? Night? Week? Then come experience Ultra 4 racing Axial 1/10 scale RECON style.

Come get your scale adventure fix, at the 2014 Axial RECON Ultra4 G6!

To Pre-register for this event, click here!

Please visit RECON on their web pages and FaceBook here….

RECON G6 Facebook

Axial’s AS-3 Servo Upgrade


Axial’s AS-3 servo is standard equipment in all RTR Axial vehicles. We know most people hear the term “RTR servo” and they immediately think an “upgrade” is in order. But, this servo is actually very capable for an RTR servo, especially when used in conjunction with 1.9 wheels and tires. The AS-3 servo is a digital servo, it has metal gears and is rated at 150 ounces of torque at 6.0 volts. The one drawback that this servo does have is the main output shaft is supported by a plastic bushing rather than a bearing. After you have run a few battery packs through your RTR you may notice a little slop in the servo’s output shaft where the servo horn attaches. Once dirt gets in around the output shaft and bushing, it starts to wear the bushing fairly quickly. As the bushing wears the servo output shaft will develop some side to side play. Once it wears to a certain point your gear mesh will be compromised and you run the risk of stripping teeth off a servo gear. Luckily for us Fast Eddy Bearings has recognized that a simple inexpensive bearing can add a lot of life to that RTR servo, and eliminate these problems. This is the best “bang for your buck” mod you can make to any Axial RTR vehicle. It is a simple, inexpensive way to upgrade your Axial AS-3 RTR servo.

Remove the servo horn from the servo’s output shaft. Then, remove the servo from the front axle. You will want to unplug the servo from the receiver, just to make the switch less of a hassle. A shot of the servo, and the new 6x10x2.5mm bearing that will replace the bushing.

Using a 1.5mm driver, loosen up the 4 small screws on the bottom of the servo case.

You can leave the screws in the case, just make sure they are all loose.

Set the servo upright so it is sitting on the heads of the 4 screws. Push down on the case and the screws will pop the top cap off. Notice the white bushing on the servo’s output shaft. That is what we will be replacing. If you don’t see it around the output, check the cap of the servo case.

Bushing removed.

A side by side shot of the bearing and bushing.

Install the new bearing in the top cap.

Reinstall the servo’s top cap and you are done!

Performing this simple mod will add a lot of life to your AS-3 servo. As mentioned earlier, this is one of the best mods you can make to your RTR Axial vehicle for durability reasons. If you have an old AS-3 servo laying around because it has some slop and you wanted to upgrade. Try installing one of these bearings, and you will have a decent metal gear servo for your spare parts bin.

Link to 6x10x2.5 bearing.

Still not sure you have the confidence to perform this modification? Check out Team Fast Eddy’s video tutorial for a visual step by step “how to”!

Axial RECON G6 – Hunt for UNIO Report – Oroville, CA

RECON G6 Challenge presents The Hunt for Unio

Saturday, April 20, 2012

Bald Rock Trailhead, Oroville, California

RECON must be doing something right.  Why else would I be waking up early on a Saturday morning to drive over three hours to drive RC cars?  Skeeno Jr. and I loaded up the Honcho and Wraith, fueled up at Starbucks, and headed out to find Unio.  We weren’t sure what Unio was; we only had the following photo as a clue.

He kinda looked like Bigfoot.  Skeeno Jr. has watched all the Finding Bigfoot shows on Animal Plant, so she was anxious to get the search started. I on the other hand, was a little apprehensive.

About an hour outside of Reno, Nevada we spotted an old friend

Yup, that’s Cisco Grove; location of the greatest RC festival on Earth, AXIALFEST.  If you have never been, call them right now (530-426-1600) and reserve your camp spot for June 21-23. Tell them Brian Parker sent ya.

Like I said, Skeeno Jr. and I had a little drive and the roads were unfamiliar and twisty. We started to worry we had taken a wrong turn when we finally found the sign we were searching for.

We showed up later than we wanted, but still with plenty of time.  We jumped in line to register with the other 55+ G6ers who also were looking for Unio.

I saw this Unimog in the parking lot.  My favorite G Ride is the VW Transporter that was at Axialfest last year, but this is really fighting me for the #1 place in my heart.

Before I go any further, I have to make sure everyone knows this guy. This is Brad Bailey, aka B-Rad.  He is kinda whiney, but he is the #2 man behind RECON. He cried that I never give him any props in the blog, so here you go Mr. Bailey, your very own special cameo. Once known as the invisible man, he is now like Pinocchio; a real boy! If you give him a Monster when you register, you will receive a time bonus.

Parker had a few new details to go over with the G6 veterans and newbies before the fun began; new trail marker colors…..special shout out to Anthony Rivas for staying up all night with the G Crew to get them all made.

Parker told us he spotted Unio the night before and to be on the lookout.  He warned us that Unio may or may not be friendly.

While Parker continued his pregame instructions, Skeeno Jr. and I snuck away to look for signs of Unio.  We found this interesting tree with a unique bubble.  Could this have been caused by Unio?

This was TM1.  It was a little farther up from the start than usual.  Glad I scouted a bit so I knew where to go once the whistle blew.

Finally it was go time.  The first 20 or so trail markers took you up a canopied trail.  It was a little cool and dark in there.

Once you cleared the tree line, this is what greeted you; the largest slab of granite I have ever walked on. The beauty of this place is hard to capture with a cheap camera like mine, but I recommend a visit of this place.

There were many steep inclines, side hills, and crevices to navigate as you made your way to the top.

The Blog Honcho chugged along and made it to the top of the world.  There were lots of cool wind sculpted rock formations up here.

It almost looks like this Bronco is about to catch a wave. Surfing trucks?  Maybe an idea for the Shaka Brah III.

Every course that Parker lays down has to have some clear dirt.  Thankfully, this clear dirt was very pure, mountain spring water.  It even has a little life in it.  These pollywogs will be delicious frog legs soon enough.

Unibomber found some wildlife up on the rocks.  By the way, Unibomber is another unsung hero of the G Crew.  He is usually the one tasked to pick up all the trail markers at the end of the day.  Shake his hand and bring him a hamburger and a Monster next time you see him.

I run the Ultra class, so I can finish up quicker to capture photos. Skeeno Jr runs in the Adventurist class.  Luckily, every time I go to check on her, there is a friendly G6er to assist her.  Here the PLE crew is getting her Wraith righted.  Special thanks to Sumquak and crew for looking out for her all day.

Speaking of helping out.  G6ers are always quick to pull out a tow line to help a rig clear a difficult obstacle.  If you have never G6ed, don’t be shy.  Everyone helps each other.

This guy was even kind enough to wedge his rig into a crevice, so others didn’t have to pull out their sand ramps.

Since the G6 is not a race, and more of an adventure, it is common to see groups running together.   It reminds me of 1:1 trail runs I’ve taken on the Rubicon and Sierra Trek. It’s a great way to get the family outside for some fun.   Husbands, wives, girlfriends, dads, grandfathers, sons, and daughters are all seen at a G6. This was this young lady’s first G6.  The smile tells me she’ll be back.

It was a little hot out.  Don’t forget to hydrate.  Camelbaks are a good idea at any G6.

Elio is just about finished.  Here he drops in at 97

I’m having so much fun, I almost forgot about Unio.  Did you? This guy is still searching.

G6 Two, Electric Boogaloo?  M-Pham decided to do a little RC break dancing.

I have no idea what this guy is doing, but that doesn’t look like the fast line. He probably went to the M-Pham School of Driving.

Break time in the shade.

Uh oh, looks like the Walk of Shame is coming.  Keep your head high little one.  Every G6er does it eventually.

Check out the new Fast Eddy Bearings G6 Score Cards.  They look slick, work well, and come with a 10% off coupon for all Fast Eddy products.

TM80.  This Jeep is making tracks back to G-Central.

Are those Unio footprints by TM81? Better keep your eyes peeled.

This lady was bumping an iPod in her JK.  Every G6er needs their own theme music on the trail.

One last TM before finishing.

Holy Crapoly, what is that?  Is that Unio? Should I run?

Heck no!  Unio was a good guy.  He really enjoyed the Axial SCX10, but the Wraith was his favorite.

He even posed for some selfies.

This is a G6 right of passage.  The Parker Pickup.  Every newbie gets one.

Props to this guy for working hard for his G degree.  He fixed his rig three times before having to do the Walk of Shame.  Better luck next time and may the G be with you.

Drivers of the Day showing off their unique awards.  My favorite is the Top Banana.  What’s yours?

Again we want to thank all our sponsors for making the G6 a great event to use, abuse, test, and G6 Certify all their products. Finishing a G6 is great, but taking home a little swag makes it even better.

The G Train is currently on a whirl wind tour of the US and Canada.  Check the list of events on for details on events in your area.


Axial – ICON Vehicle Dynamics 61-90mm Aluminum Shocks – Step by Step Build

AX30103 – Icon 61-90mm Aluminum Shock Set – 7mm piston (2pcs)

Now that we have released Axial’s newest scale shocks, which are officially licensed by Icon Vehicle Dynamics, I wanted to take some time to do a step by step build here on the blog to help people get the most out of their new shocks. These shocks are an improvement over our old SCX10 shocks, because of the new fully machined shock piston. The new piston provides a tighter fit inside the shock body which helps eliminate binds as the shock cycles through its travel. The new Icon shock bodies and reservoirs are clear anodized for durability and classic looks, which is a nice touch. Time to dig in and get our hands dirty!

A shot of the packaging. Each package contains all parts and hardware required to build two complete shocks.

I cut all the plastic parts I will need to get started off their respective parts trees.

Open the hardware bags and dump the contents out in a secure location so you don’t loose any vital parts.

Start by locating your aluminum shock bodies and the red o-rings. Apply a little grease to each o-ring before installing them into the shock bodies.

Once you have the o-ring lubed up drop it into place in the bottom of the shock body.

Now locate the plastic spacer that goes in between the o-rings, and install that on top of the first o-ring.

Grease the 2nd o-ring and install it into place on top of the plastic spacer in the shock body.

Next install the lower plastic cartridge and threaded preload adjuster onto the shock body.

Locate your shock shafts and e-clips next.

Install the first e-clip in the bottom slot on the shock shaft.

Slide the shock piston onto the shock shaft next.

Then, install the second e-clip to hold the piston in place.

Both shafts prepped and ready for the next step.

Now we can slide the shock shafts into the shock body from the top. Install the rubber bump stops and thread the rod ends into place as needed.

Apply the Icon decals to the shock reservoirs.

Using the supplied hardware, secure the shock reservoirs to the shock caps.

Insert the black o-rings into the shock cap, and make sure they are properly seated.

Now we will fill the shock body about 3/4 of the way with shock oil and cycle the shock piston to dissipate any and all air bubbles. Make sure the piston stays submersed in the oil while you cycle the shock to get rid of the air bubbles. Once the bubbles are gone fill the shock body until the oil is about 1/16th of an inch from the top of the shock body, so just shy of being full. Once the shock shaft is fully compressed, you should see the oil crown just above the top of the shock body. Screw the cap down tight while holding the shock shaft fully compressed. Once the cap is tight, wipe any excess oil away. Cycle the shock shaft a few times and listen for air bubbles. If you can hear air bubbles gurgling around inside the shock, start over and use a little more oil. Make sure all air bubbles are gone before re-assembling. If the shock shaft won’t compress all the way after this step, you have a little too much oil in the shock body. Remove the shock cap, and re-bleed the shock with a little less oil.

After you are finished bleeding the shock we can install the dual rate springs and spacers as needed.

Slide the springs over the shock body with the plastic spring retainer between the two springs.

Install the lower spring retainer next, and you are done!

That wraps up building Axial’s new fully licensed Icon shocks. Following these tips will help people get the most out of their new SCX10 shocks.

Axial Day in Italy

Robotronics, [Axial's distributor for Italy] recently hosted a single day event catered to Axial customers and potential R/C newcomers. The event took place on Sunday, September 30th. Even though it rained for the few days prior to the event, the rain held off long enough on Sunday for the event to go off without a hitch. Attendees were treated to a custom built scale trail run that featured many different obstacles, both man made and natural. The course had a little of everything built in from hill climbs, to rock crawling sections, bridges, mud, sidehills and even trials type obstacles. There were two different classes to be run based on tire and wheel size, the 1.9 class for SCX10′s as well as the 2.2 class for the AX10′s and Wraith’s that attended. Drivers spent the morning practicing on the course to get a feel for the layout and the obstacles. After lunch the competition started for both classes, and the top 3 for each class were crowned. Numerous prizes were handed out during the day as part of the giveaway that was going on as well. So, a lucky few walked away with free R/C gear on top of a great day of R/C trail running. Looks like a great course to crawl on, especially with the mud and water holes. We are a little jealous!!

A few highlights from the event. An overall group shot.

Competitors checking out the goods!


SCX10 climbing out of a mud hole.

Axial display.

SCX10 on 2.2 wheels and tires attempts a man made hill climb.

A Wraith climbs out of another mud hole.

A future 1:1 offroad enthusiast in training.

The full event report and photos can be found here.

All in all we would say it looks like a lot of fun, congrats to the winners!!

Axial visits 2012 Easter Jeep Safari – Highlights Video

We finally found some time to edit a highlight video from the 2012 Easter Jeep Safari in Moab, Utah. Highlights include trail runs with Rebel Offroad on Hell’s Revenge, Poison Spider Mesa and Metal Masher. Also shot some footage at Area BFE with the R/C’s. We even found a little sand to play in for the Formula Offroad vehicles and the EXO.