MEET THE CONCOURS JUDGES – AXIALFEST 2017

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Hello AXIALFEST 2017 participants! The Concours Class is now in its fourth official year and growing because of YOU! Because last year’s participants stepped up the game, AXIALFEST is responding back with additional classes! Concours just keeps growing!
With the addition of classes we’ve also added some more judges too!

MEET THE CONCOURS JUDGES – AXIALFEST 2017

• Matthew Kett of ScaleBuildersGuild.com
• Anthony Rivas of Rivas Concepts
• Josh Elliott of ExtremeScalePerformanceRC.com
• John Badger of RCCrawler.com
• Ryan Gerrish of DSPRO
• Chris De Graaf of HemistormRC
• Tony Phalen of CompetitionX.com
• Matthew Skeeno of Skeeno’s Skinny Dipping Service
• Rodney Wills, Axial Global Marketing Director & Judging 1:1 car/truck shows since 2004.

The following are your judges bios:

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BIO: MATTHEW KETT OF SCALE BUILDER GUILD
Since 2006, Matthew Kett (aka Imthatguy) has had a passion for radio control, specifically, scale accurate RC trucks. That passion inevitably led to The Scale Builder’s Guild web forum. The Scale Builder’s Guild is a purpose built forum with one goal in mind. Uniting scale radio control enthusiasts worldwide, and providing an environment to share their projects, knowledge and talent. Since that time, the SBG has evolved into the number one destination for scale accurate RC builds and boasts 5,000 forum members, 20,000 Facebook followers and nearly 9,000 Instagrammers!

Matthew actively builds RC models and attends as many competition and expo style events as he can. He likes to build truck bodies from scratch using techniques he’s learned through practice and patience. His favourite brand is Toyota, as evidenced by his extensive RC collection, including 40, 60, 70 and 80-series Land Cruiser’s, Hilux’s, SR5’s and a rare Toyota Trailblazer (notice a pattern?). He’s won numerous awards for his builds and has been featured in many magazines. He enjoys building all kits, but Axial’s have always been his favourite. Attention to detail and accuracy are his number one goals in all his builds.

Matthew is a film editor by day and works in television commercials and online content. He lives in Toronto, Ontario, Canada with his wife and two cats. For more information on the SBG, visit www.scalebuildersguild.com, facebook.com/scalebuildersguild, instagram.com/scalebuildersguild and youtube.com/8imthatguy8

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ANTHONY RIVAS_
BIO: ANTHONY RIVAS OF RIVAS CONCEPTS
Since I was kid I have been fascinated by cars, and trucks in general. So naturally I loved R/C! After breaking a few department store cars my dad got me my first Hobby Grade R/C. This was the beginning for me, it would always be a part of my life in some way. It was fun to go fast and jump, but more fun when I had a purpose, like sled pulls, and seeing who could drive a course the fastest.

At 16 my first 1:1 vehicle was a 1983 4WD Toyota SR5 pickup truck, when I was 17 I was introduced to rock crawling and hooked. I spent months in my garage learning to wrench, mostly bolt on and mechanical stuff like axles, clutch, birfields , and dual transfer cases. I wanted to conquer Colorado and Moab trails. Little did I know this 1:1 hobby would one day have a 1/10 scale counterpart.
Fast forward to 2006, I discovered RC Rock Crawling on a 1:1 Forum. This was much cheaper than fixing my 1:1 and it was starting up all over the country. I was working in the Oil and Natural gas fields across the U.S. and you could be certain I had an RC crawler in my work truck. I started traveling to compete in Rock Crawling events and just having fun. One day at a local hobby store I saw a truck body and put it on my back-up Axial AX10 comp crawler, to me this was the day Rivas Concepts was born. From this day forward I would set my comp crawler in line and go drive, this would later be called scale crawling. I liked it because it resembled a real truck. People said I was wasting a perfectly good Comp Rig, but I was having fun. Someone once asked about my crawler with with truck body, I walked up as a friend replied “Oh that’s a Rivas Concept rig. I liked it, so I used it.
I enjoy the resemblance to 1:1 trucks so much I started doing pictures and video. This is what Really got the Rivas Concepts name out there globally. I have even done some RC projects with 1:1 companies like Falken Tire, but truly I do it because I love the imagination and creativity behind it. #Rivasconcepts

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BIO: JOSH ELLIOTT of EXTREME SCALE PERFORMANCE
Back in 2007 while living in Hawaii Josh picked up his first Axial. It was an AX10 Scorpion RTR and he decided to turn it into a Jeep to take to the beach. In order to show his friends and family back home he decided to make a video and put it on YouTube. 10 years later and that channel is now one of the most supported in the RC industry! Josh has been blessed with an impressive lineup of sponsors and a supporting network of over 16,000 YouTube Subscribers, 17,000 Facebook followers & 6,000 Instagram followers! He has taken home some awesome awards such as Axialfest 2016 Best of Show! His YouTube channel is home to several popular series such as Motor Control, Camping with Coleman and ScaleWars! With a focus on using the radio control hobby to inspire creativity, an active, healthy lifestyle, and most importantly a positive mindset, don’t be surprised if he seems like someone you have been friends with forever! He has an impressive lineup of diverse builds with an obvious soft spot for Axial based Jeeps. Aside from running his YouTube channel Extreme Scale Performance full-time he also has a small “Content Creation” company by the name SonderFelt to handle client productions. Josh lives in picturesque Bend Oregon with his Wife & 3 dogs. To learn more about Josh and Extreme Scale Performance visit www.extremescaleperformance.com, www.youtube.com/dogcrick, www.facebook.com/extremescaleperformance, www.instagram.com/esp_rc

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BIO: CHRIS DE GRAAF of HEMISTORMRC
I got into hobby grade RC at the age of 16, and started to get obsessed by it almost ten years later. The HPI Baja for me was what really kicked off my RC life as it is today. Driving Endurance Cups, eventually even producing parts for the HPI Baja made my company HemiStorm get noticed by magazines in the USA such as RC Driver and RC Car Action. In 2010 I quit working as a contractor and decided to dedicate my time fully to grow my company HemiStorm Products.

In 2011 I sold my house in The Netherlands to move to Norway, and I used the profits from the seven years in which I built my house from the ground up to take on some more risky, expensive projects in manufacturing. That’s when I came out with the first aftermarket body for the then brand new Losi 5ive.

In 2012 I noticed there was a demand for sharing tips and tricks through videos, as most large scale RC forums were slowly fading. It was also hard to find honest, non-sugarcoated reviews about products. After being disappointed in supplying YouTube content creators with my own products, seeing how there was no return for my investment, I wanted to see what this whole “YouTube thing” was about. I started doing mostly painting videos, initially with a main focus on large scale RC’s. After a while I diversified the content as much as possible. Axial Racing played a huge part in making this happen. The first generation SCX10, the Exo Terra and the Yeti series have assisted me in bridging the gap between my initial content and the content I produce today.

My main goal is to encourage people to hone their skills, push their boundaries and think outside the box. My channel shows that being fond of one genre in surface RC doesn’t automatically disqualify you from enjoying other aspects of the hobby. Putting a faux drift motor in the back of your Bomber is fine. No rules.

I’ve won paint competitions, been featured in a number of magazines, I’ve won the “Lifestyle Channel of 2015″ award for my YouTube channel on national TV, I’ve been featured on the national evening news and I’ve worked with companies such as Qualcomm and even famous Formula One drivers such as Lucas DiGrassi when shooting commercial videos. I’ve travelled a lot with more to come, and I’m enjoying every new face I see and embrace all the experiences and opportunities I’ve been presented and blessed with.

My YouTube channel currently has over 74000 subscribers, with some key builds being my 5th scale Dodge Challenger and my Axial Yeti XXL which runs two Castle Creations Mamba Monster X setups with 1515 motors and too many features to briefly list.

I’m working as a Brand Manager, live in Halden, Norway in the middle of the forest with my wife, twin girls and two cats.
http://www.youtube.com/hemistormrc
http://www.facebook.com/hemistormproducts
http://www.instagram.com/hemistorm
http://www.hemistorm.com

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Ryan started building crawlers in 2000 while living in California, and co-founded ORCRC (Oregon RC Rock Crawlers) in 2003 after moving back to Portland. He worked at Tammie’s Hobbies in Beaverton during the birth (TLT) and explosion (AX10) of crawling, and helped fuel it’s spread locally and through RCCrawler.com. As the local scene grew he began travelling to larger events, including the first Nationals in Moab, and the first Axial West Coast Championships at Donner Pass. He was recruited to drive for Team Axial by Brad “Bender” Dumont after a few notable victories. He’s been promoting Axial in Portland at the International Auto Show for the last 7 years, and contributing to the Axial Blog periodically. He still attends local get togethers and competitions, although not quite as frequently as he’d like.

Dspro was founded in 2008, and was the first RC company to offer 3D printed accessories for crawlers. Over the last 2 years they’ve been ramping up production of crawler related product as well as offering various small scale manufacturing services, such as laser cutting, CNC routing, and CAD. Ryan hopes to have some exciting new bodies ready for the public by the end of the year, and to expand his website to feature a wider range of hobby-related items.

Ryan currently lives in Beaverton, Oregon with his wife and 2 cats, and enjoys basketball, working on his Steyr Haflinger and Unimog 404, and long walks on the beach. He has attended every Axialfest since 2007, excluding the one on his dad’s birthday that one year. www.dsproonline.com

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BIO: TONY PHALEN of COMPETITIONX
Tony has been an avid RC enthusiast for over 25 years, building, bashing and racing pretty much anything he can get his hands on. His affection for the hobby started back around the time of the Team Associated RC10T, his first real racing vehicle. A quick trip to the track and a full night of racing netted him a 2nd place podium spot in the Novice class and it was pretty much game-on after that.

His love of racing became an addiction and his collection of cars got a bit out of hand – everything from 1:18 scale micros, motorcycles, 1:5 scale gas-powered monsters and recently scale rigs – if it had wheels, Tony was racing it! His passion for driving led to many manufacturer sponsorships and an exciting new level of racing on the Regional and National level, where he piloted his way to the top step of the podium many times.

During this time, Tony noticed a slight disconnect between beginners and the pros – it seemed like some of them never had the time to assist beginners when they were struggling. In 2001 he created CompetitionX, a website dedicated to sharing his learned knowledge of the industry with the RC community. It started out as a tuning site, a place where beginning drivers from around the world could go to learn how to properly set up their cars, but soon turned into a colossal entity that now shares RC projects, reviews and all other kinds of RC info. Over the years, Tony has also worked with and worked for many industry manufacturers as well as a leading industry magazine.

Last year he created a huge Eat. Sleep. RC. campaign, giving away thousands of dollars worth of RC gear over the year to help spread the word about Radio Control. It was a huge success! December included “25 Days of CompetitionX-mas” and the Christmas Day prize was an all-expenses paid trip to AXIALFEST2017. The winners of this package will be in attendance this year; they’re pretty pumped to be attending their first AXIALFEST event!

Today, Tony has switched gears a bit and enjoys a leisurely afternoon of trekking along trails with friends and family. He lives with his amazing, creative and ultra-supportive wife Danna and their beautiful dog Bailey. She loves RC as much as Tony does, she just shows it in a different way when she’s chewing on the tires (the dog, not the wife).
http://www.competitionx.com
https://www.facebook.com/CompetitionX/

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BIO: MATT SOILEAU aka SKEENO 
In 2000, Skeeno dipped his toes into the RC world when he decided to get an RC boat. That Traxxas Nitro Vee turned into a T-Maxx that turned into an HPI Savage that turned into an OFNA Hyper 8 that turned into an X-Ray M18 that turned into an Associated TC5. Along the way many other RC vehicles were cycled through his collection as he explored all the facets of RC.

In 2007, he attended the first Axial West Coast Championships while driving his Goliath-based crawler for Team PTI. While at the 2007 AWCC, he was first introduced to Axial products when Axial Vice President Matt Kearney showed him the prototype for the original AX10 Scorpion. From then on, he has been hooked on Axial!

Skeeno is going on 10 years straight as an Axial fanboi. He has attended every Axial West Coast Championship and Axialfest since 2007 as well as innumerable local events. In 2007, he even traveled thousands of miles to Missouri and Saint Catharines, Canada to get his scale adventure on.

While Skeeno regularly participates in Scale Adventure events, his biggest claim to fame is his unique knack for capturing the essence of these events. He started off writing printed magazine articles for Xtreme RC Cars Magazine, RC Driver Magazine, and RC Car Action Magazine as was soon given a coveted corner of the internet to post his various blogs on the Axial website. You can peruse his experiences here: http://www.axialracing.com/blog_posts?author=15

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BIO: RODNEY WILLS OF AXIAL RC INC
Rodney Wills may not have been born with a silver spoon in his mouth but he was more than compensated for it by being able to grow up behind the wheel. At eight years old he started driving heavy equipment on his uncle’s farm. Flouting child labor laws his uncle would put him to work; he would get him started and jump off the tractor, and have Rodney cut and plow fields. The uncle found Rodney a willing employee. Now while he did not engage in any tractor races, the seed had been planted (literally); the passion for driving already raced through his veins.

Later on in Alabama Rodney would drive his father’s old pickup truck. As young teen-agers sometimes do, he would sneak the truck out to splash in the mud on the local country back roads. Rodney did not limit himself to four-wheel rides, however. Motorcycles were always apart of family life and Rodney had started riding at age five. Racing motorcycles with the family came at age six on the dirt oval flat track at Talladega. Trail riding was an everyday thing in the backyard woods and local mountains.

Magazines would introduce Rodney to skateboarding in 1977 and then BMX. Normal by today’s standards but then in rural Alabama, Rodney was way ahead of his peers. Just like his hobbies, his life went in the order of Art, Music, and Cars. His passions led him to the California College of Arts and Crafts after two years at the Atlanta College of Arts and Crafts. After achieving a bachelors degree of art in graphic design, Rodney went on to work ten years in the snow, skate and surf industry through his art, working for the famous O’Neill wetsuit company. Next came the music as the art & marketing director for the car audio speaker Image Dynamics. That led to Rodney starting the import car culture lifestyle magazine, TMRm’zine (1996 – 2000). This magazine put the “lifestyle” label on the import market that has now grown to enormous proportions in the automotive industry.

Joined Axial in 2011 and hit the ground looking for adventure one rock at a time!
One of the proudest achievements was putting together the AXIAL SCX10 RUBICON TREK: http://www.axialracing.com/blog_posts?cat=814

 

 

 

 

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build

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Words and photos by Tony Phalen

I’ve been looking forward to getting one of Axial Racing’s SMT10 Monster Trucks, so when the MAX-D landed on my doorstep (thanks UPS guy), it was literally a matter of seconds before the box was open and the truck was out. I was even more stoked, however, when I found a big ol’ box of Axial’s aftermarket goodies included so I could do an upgrade article.

Below is a step-by-step guide, walking you through the disassembly and re-assembly of the SMT10 with all of these parts.

STEP 1

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build Here’s a overview shot of all the parts I’ll be installing on the MAX-D. A list is included at the end of the article complete with part numbers and links.

STEP 2

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
I’ll be splitting the build up into three sections; front, rear and mid. Here’s a pic of the parts I’ll be using for the front end rebuild; steering parts, upper and lower link plates, link mounts, shock parts, gears and the diff cover.

STEP 3

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
Since the SMT10 is modular in design, I need to remove anything that will keep the front from coming off easily – that being the front tires and servo. Once the servo has been disconnected, you can let it dangle down and under the center transmission.

STEP 4

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
To remove the front ‘clip’, simply unscrew at the three attachment points designated by the red arrows. Do this on both sides and the front end will drop right off. Pay close attention to the WB8 center driveshaft coupler; it fits between the front and center driveshaft sections and, once the front clip is removed, this piece can fall out.

STEP 5

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
Attach the AX31244 Axial Upper Link Plate Set and AX31245 Axial Lower Link Plate Set. Because of the design, I didn’t need to remove anything other than the shocks; that’s fine because I need to work on those at a later time anyway.

STEP 6

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
The AX31432 Axial AR60 Machined Servo Plate and Mount Set is up next for install, but before you do that, assemble it and attach the servo to it. This ensures the two side upright pieces line up with the servo. I would also suggest using a dab of blue threadlocker on the two screws going up and into the aluminum side uprights. Once everything is aligned, remove the servo.

STEP 7

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
Remove the stock plastic servo mount and replace with the aluminum assembly from STEP 6.

STEP 8

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
Remove the lower links and replace the plastic link mounts with the AX31433 Axial AR60 Machined Link Mounts. Re-attach the lower links.

STEP 9

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
Before moving on, I suggest paying close attention to the orientation of the steering blocks in relation to the lower link mounts. The upgrade C-hubs I’ll be using have more adjustability than the stock plastic ones, so if you just throw them on and clock the C-hub like the original (red arrow), your caster will be WAY off. So, my suggestion is not to assemble to match the C-hub (red arrow), but to assemble to match the top kingpin screw (orange line).

STEP 10

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
But first, remove the steering system. Four screws will do it.

STEP 11

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
I’m also going to replace the diff gears while I’m at this point. Remove the four screws holding on the diff cover and the four screws holding the diff in place. You’ll need to pull the axles out a bit to disengage them from the diff.

STEP 12

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
Remove the four screws to release the stock diff gear and replace with the AX30395 Axial Heavy Duty Diff Gear. Make sure the gasket is in place and not still attached to the original diff gear. A keen eye will notice the planetary diff design instead of a locked unit. This type of differential is actually a better fit for Monster Trucks.

STEP 13

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
You’ll need to replace the stock input gear as well; that can be done on the opposite side of the axle. Replace with the AX30395 Axial Heavy Duty Input Gear, re-install the differential and slide the axles back into the housing. You may need to rotate the axles to key them into the differenial.

STEP 14

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
Replace the stock plastic cover with this beautiful AX31429 Axial AR60 Machined High Clearance Differential Cover.

STEP 15

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
Ok, now it’s time for the steering. On one side at a time, pull the plastic parts off, keeping the bearings and hat bushings handy. Re-assemble the the AX30762 Axial XR10 Aluminum C-Hub Carrier and AX31434 Axial AR60 Machined Steering Knuckles. Note the orientation of the parts; if you get confused, look at the opposite side of the steering to make sure you’ve assembled it correctly (the reason why I suggest removing only one side at a time).

STEP 16

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
The AX31428 Axial AR60 Steering Upgrade Kit comes with a small build sheet in it. Use that to assemble the steering links, then attach them to your steering knuckles. The final assembly should look like this.

STEP 17

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
Using STEP 9 as a guide, slide one C-hub onto the axle and secure. Now slide the other C-hub onto the axle and secure.

STEP 18

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
At first, I thought the shocks were going to be a pain; replacing oil, bleeding, etc. However, if you complete this step carefully, you won’t have to do any of that!

Start by inserting the rubber o-ring into the AX31430 Axial King Shocks Aluminum Collars; set aside. Grab your shocks and remove the lower spring retainer and spring. Carefully remove the shock cap and set the shock off to the side in some sort of stand. Pull the bladder out of the shock cap (if it’s up in there) and install it into the AX31430 Axial King Shocks Aluminum Cap; set aside. Grab your shock again and spin the plastic collar off; it can only be removed from the top. Spin the King Aluminum Collar on followed by the King Aluminum Shock Cap. Install the spring from the bottom and the AX31431 Axial Aluminum Shock Spring Retainer. These retainers utilize a small screw to keep them from popping off in the event of an crash. These are, after all, Monster Trucks – there will be plenty of crashing.

STEP 19

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
Re-attach the shocks to the lower links and, wah-lah. Your completed from clip should look like this! Ain’t she pretty?

STEP 20

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
Attach your front end to the chassis; if you’re unsure, use STEP 4 and the three red arrows to remind you. This is also the time to re-attach the servo and servo horn. Use a dab of blue threadlocker on the four screws that attach the servo to the aluminum mounts to make sure they stay put.

STEP 21

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
I’ll be moving to the rear of the MAX-D, installing the parts shown here. The procedure will be pretty much the same as the front end; the only minor difference will be the lockouts. Be sure to pay attention to the WB8 center driveshaft coupler as well.

STEP 22

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
Remove the rear clip; STEP 4 and the red arrows will help you out here. You’ll need to remove the anti-roll bar connections that attach at the lower link mount.

STEP 23

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
Attach the AX31244 Axial Upper Link Plate Set and AX31245 Axial Lower Link Plate Set as well as the AX31433 Axial AR60 Machined Link Mounts.

STEP 24

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
Remove the lockouts and pull the axles out slightly; this will allow you to remove the rear differential.

STEP 25

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
With the same procedure as the front, replace the stock gear with the AX30395 Axial Heavy Duty Diff Gear.

STEP 26

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
Remove and replace the AX30395 Axial Heavy Duty Input Gear from the other side of the axle, then re-install the diff gear. Cap the opening off with the AX31429 Axial AR60 Machined High Clearance Differential Cover. Key the rear axles into the diff gear, then slide the AX30789 Axial AR60 OCP Aluminum Straight Axle Hub Carriers into place. These are an easy install; they are a straight fit and can’t be clocked like the front C-hub.

STEP 27

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
I replaced the plastic bits with the aluminum upgrades like I did with the front shocks.

STEP 28

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
Boom – the rear clip is done! Your final assembly should look like this.

STEP 29

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
Re-attach the rear clip and connect the anti-roll bar. Since we replaced the plastic link mounts with aluminum, you’ll want to add a small drop of blue threadlocker to help keep the anti-roll bar links in place.

STEP 30

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
Alright – on to my favorite portion of the build, the electronics! Now, this is MAX-D – MAXIMUM DESTRUCTION – so I’m going big and replacing the stock brushed system with some serious Axial mojo; something Tom Meents would be proud of. I’ll be dropping in an AX24260 Axial AE-3 Vanguard Brushless ESC and AX31047 Axial Brushless 3150kV Motor. Since this is a pretty healthy upgrade, I see it only fitting to upgrade a couple other parts as well.

STEP 31

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
To make this part of the build easier, I started by removing the top part of the roll cage and interior.

STEP 32

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
Here’s a better look at the ESC tray. We’ll get to it in a minute.

STEP 33

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
Flip the MAX-D over and remove the four screws that hold the transmission in place. Axial uses two different screw lengths here so to make sure I get them back in the correct holes, I’ve added a little L (for Longer). Once the screws are out, unplug the motor and pull the whole transmission assembly out. It’s actually alot easier than it looks.

STEP 34

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
Remove the gear cover followed by the motor and slipper assembly.

STEP 35

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
Remove the stock motor place and replace with the AX30860 Axial Machined Motor Plate.

STEP 36

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
Before attaching the spur gear, make sure you attach the AX31068 Axial Slipper Pads. They’re sticky-backed so they’re not reusable; we have to add new ones to our AX31163 Axial Steel Spur Gear 32P 56T. Re-assemble the slipper clutch. I would suggest tightening down the slipper nut quite a bit; the added power needs a tighter slipper.

The only drawback with the AX31047 Axial Brushless 3150kV Motor is the fact that it uses a 5mm output shaft; the stock motor uses a 3mm. This means you’ll need a new pinion gear. I didn’t want the MAX-D to just have more power, I wanted it to be fast as well, so I’m starting with a AX30839 13T 32P Pinion Gear. MO’ POWA ARH ARH ARH

STEP 37

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
Now that I have a new heart for the MAX-D, it’s time to transplant it back in the truck. Remember to install the screws in the correct holes.

STEP 38

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
Flip the SMT10 back over and remove the top to the receiver box. Carefully pull the stock ESC power lead out of the receiver and remove it from the truck.

STEP 39

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
Apply some double-sided tape to the bottom of the AX24260 Axial AE-3 Vanguard Brushless ESC and attach it to the ESC platform. Route the ESC power lead through the waterproof seal and into the receiver box as shown. Re-attach the receiver box lid.

Finally, plug the brushless motor wires into the ESC, matching the A-wire to the A-plug, the B-wire to the B-plug and the C-wire to the C-plug.

STEP 40

Axial MAX-D SMT10 Monster Truck Full Option Build
The final step is to re-attach both the interior and top of the roll cage. Looks super tough just sitting there! Time to go see what she can do!

Here’s the list of parts used in this article.

Front End
AX30395 Axial Heavy Duty Bevel Gear Set – 38T/13T
AX30762 Axial XR10 Aluminum C-Hub Carrier
AX31244 Axial Upper Link Plate Set
AX31245 Axial Lower Link Plate Set
AX31428 Axial AR60 Steering Upgrade Kit
AX31429 Axial AR60 Machined High Clearance Differential Cover
AX31430 Axial King Shocks Aluminum Caps and Collar Set – 12mm
AX31431 Axial Aluminum Shock Spring Retainer – 12mm
AX31432 Axial AR60 Machined Servo Plate and Mount Set
AX31433 Axial AR60 Machined Link Mounts
AX31434 Axial AR60 Machined Steering Knuckles

Mid-Section
AX24260 Axial AE-3 Vanguard Brushless ESC
AX30839 13T 32P Pinion Gear
AX30860 Axial Machined Motor Plate
AX31047 Axial Brushless 3150kV Motor
AX31068 Axial Slipper Pads
AX31163 Axial Steel Spur Gear 32P 56T

Rear End
AX30395 Axial Heavy Duty Bevel Gear Set – 38T/13T
AX30789 Axial AR60 OCP Aluminum Straight Axle Hub Carrier
AX31244 Axial Upper Link Plate Set
AX31245 Axial Lower Link Plate Set
AX31429 Axial AR60 Machined High Clearance Differential Cover
AX31430 Axial King Shocks Aluminum Caps and Collar Set – 12mm
AX31431 Axial Aluminum Shock Spring Retainer – 12mm
AX31433 Axial AR60 Machined Link Mounts

Installing a Snow Plow on Your SCX10

tech_snowplow

Words and photos by Tony Phalen

Being a SoCal native, I’ve never had a reason to build a RC vehicle with a snow plow attachment. After a move to Connecticut back in 2013, it occurred to me why a slew of snow-moving builds pop up in that latter months of the year. Funny thing is I never took advantage of this situation, that is, until I moved BACK to sunny Southern California in 2015. After seeing a bunch of videos on YouTube with guys plowing their front yards, a friend (in CT) hit me up wanting me to build a custom rig for her husband for his birthday.

The entire build was pretty awesome, but for this article I’m going to just run through the quick steps of attaching RC4WD’s plow unit on the SCX10 Ram Power Wagon.

Step 1

Installing a RC4WD Snow Plow on Your SCX10
My first step in any build is to lay out the parts so I know what I’m working with. We have our SCX10 and the parts from RC4WD’s Snow Plow unit – a pretty simple plow that comes almost completely assembled. A few extra pieces come with the kit to attach it to the frame rails on the SCX10. You’ll also need a spare servo, preferably one with a decent amount of torque.

Step 2

Installing a RC4WD Snow Plow on Your SCX10 The plow attaches to the SCX10 between the frame rails. To get to this area, we need to first remove the stock plastic cap. Two screws is all it takes, then give the plastic cap a good pull to remove it.

Step 3

Installing a RC4WD Snow Plow on Your SCX10 Assemble the bumper mount as shown. You’ll want to make sure the two mounting ‘tabs’ (red arrow) are tilted up; this angles the plow correctly once installed. Also take note of the flat area on the plow mounts (green arrow) – notice the flat spot is pointing down. I suggest using blue threadlocker on all the screws here to prevent them from falling out.

Step 4

Installing a RC4WD Snow Plow on Your SCX10 Time to install the servo, however before you do, I suggest removing all of the screws (one at a time) and re-installing with a dab of blue threadlocker. I also advise removing the plow blade entirely during the install.

Moving on – slide the servo into place and attach (don’t forget your blue threadlocker). Attach one end of the chain to the servo horn and the other end to the bottom plow pickup. Typically, servos come with the output shaft set at 90°, so let’s start by attaching the servo horn angled up a bit like the photo. We can adjust the ‘pull height’ after we have the entire unit installed. You can re-install the plow blade at this point.

Step 5

Installing a RC4WD Snow Plow on Your SCX10Attach the bumper mount assembly (from Step 3) to the plow assembly. The mount slides into ‘keyed’ slots in the back of the plow assembly. Blue threadlocker is suggested here.

Step 6

Installing a RC4WD Snow Plow on Your SCX10Slide the mounting tabs between the frame rails and secure with the button head screws. Again, blue threadlocker is suggested here as well.

Step 7

Installing a RC4WD Snow Plow on Your SCX10
Remove the receiver box top and feed the servo lead into the box. Axial uses a 3-channel Tactic radio system, so thankfully there is an open port for the plug – port 3. Re-install the receiver box top.

Now, before you head on out to remove some snow, we need to test the plow for proper operation. Turn the transmitter on, then plug in the battery and turn the SCX10 on. There are two buttons right under your thumb (on the transmitter) – one raises the plow, the other lowers it. Go ahead and give it a quick test. If the buttons raise and lower the plow, you’re good to go. If you want the plow to raise up more, you have 2 options; 1) remove the servo horn and angle it up more or 2), shorten the chain by changing the attachment points.

Good luck and happy plowing!

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Here is a list of parts used in this article:

AX90037 SCX10™ Ram Power Wagon 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – RTR
Z-X0007 RC4WD Blade Snow Plow
36645 Hitec D‑645MW 32‑bit, High Speed, Metal Gear Servo

Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build

tech_yetitrophytruckfulloption

Words and photos by Tony Phalen

Whenever I get a new vehicle, I like to take the first couple weeks to just drive it in box-stock form to learn about its traits; how it handles, any quirky nuances, etc. During this time I also take some time to review any hop ups that might become available, giving me an idea on how my long-term upgrade process is going to play out. Thankfully, the SCORE Trophy Truck shares the same platform as the Yeti Rock Racer, which means that there are a slew of performance goodies already available. Armed with a bag of aluminum bits, I decided it was time to install them prior to getting this rig all dirty. Not only did that make it a lot easier to deal with (read: no dirt!), it also looks much prettier in pictures. Time for an Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build!

Step 1

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Here are the parts I’ll be installing in this article. I’ve got quite a bit of work ahead; shocks, gears, machined parts and turnbuckles. A full list of the parts I installed is included at the bottom of this article.

Step 2

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Since I’m going to need to remove the center transmission for upgrades, I disconnected the motor wires from the ESC. Pay attention to how the wires connect; if you have a photographic memory, you’re good to go. If not (like me), you can mark them to keep things straight. I put one silver mark for the A wire, 2 for the B and 3 for the C.

Step 3

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build I’m going to be working on the front end of the SCORE TT first. I started by removing the top deck support brace. It requires the removal of 10 screws in two different lengths so, to keep things organized, I put them back in the holes after removal.

Step 4

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Once the top deck support brace has been lifted off, removal of the front clip is easy. There are 4 screws underneath the chassis and the two hinge pin screws. I also disconnected the fixed-length steering turnbuckles as well – I’m replacing them with adjustable ones.

Step 5

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Separate the gearbox from the shock tower by removing the 4 screws holding them together. I’m only working with the differential at this time so I set the rest of the front clip assembly aside. Note the orientation of the diff in the gearbox. You’ll want to make sure you re-install it the same way.

Step 6

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Next, I removed the differential and bevel gear assemblies from the gearbox. I’m replacing them with the AX30395 Heavy Duty Bevel Gear Set shown in the picture. One thing to notice is that the assemblies have straight cut gears; this design is pretty strong and easy to machine. The new HD versions are helical cut, or machined with a slight angle in them. These are great for high-torque applications like crawlers or, in this case, hardcore trophy trucks! To replace, remove the 4 screws on the diff to release the gear, set the new gear in place and re-install the 4 screws. If you’re the tinkering type, you might think about adding some optional fluid to the diff prior to putting it back together (I did, 1000wt). The HD bevel gear is a one-piece unit so replacing the stock part is a simple pull-and-replace operation. One final step I performed was to remove the rubber stops that are installed in each diff outdrive. If you hold the diff on its side, you’ll see them down inside there. These are used to keep the dogbones tight and prevent them from ejecting during a hard crash, however they hinder the up and down suspension movement slightly. Since I’ll be replacing the dogbones with universals, they’re not needed anymore.

Step 7

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Next up was the AX31170 Machined Front Shock Tower and AX31169 Machined Body Post Mount. These parts are a direct bolt on and work the same as the stock parts, however as you can see there are a few extra pieces. I’ll get to those in a bit.

Step 8

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build I disassembled the front clip down to the front shock tower assembly. The only part I’ll be reusing from this is the plastic body post.

Step 9

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build I attached the AX31169 Machined Body Post Mount to the AX31170 Machined Front Shock Tower. Since this is an aluminum-to-aluminum connection, I used a dab of threadlocker on the screws to make sure they don’t loosen up. I slid the plastic body post into the mount and used the screws provided to secure.

Step 10

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build I’m ditching the stock dogbone setup for a set of Axial’s AX31135 94mm Universal Axle Set. These come as a pair, are pre-assembled and slide right into place.

Step 11

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build I re-assembled the front clip – the new shock tower to the gearbox and the front bumper to the tower. I left the shocks off for now since I was replacing them with a full set of Axial’s Icons. You can also see the aluminum upper shock mounts that are included with the aluminum shock tower.

Step 12

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build For strength and additional tuning, I’m adding a full set of front adjustable turnbuckles (AX31249 Yeti Turnbuckle Set). This kit includes an excellent build sheet, so assembly is very easy. Just build the turnbuckles to the appropriate lengths and you’re good to go. I would suggest keeping them separate during the build so you don’t mix up the steering links with the camber links; the two are different.

Step 13

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Before attaching the front clip back on the TT, I need to do a little work on the transmission. I pulled it from the TT and removed the gear cover, motor, plastic backing plate and plastic motor mount.

Step 14

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build I installed Axial’s AX31156 Machined Adjustable Motor Mount, a 2-piece unit that includes the main mount that attaches to the gearbox and a mount that attaches to the motor. The motor mount part swivels to adjust the gear mesh and uses an upper clamp to keep it securely in place. Because it’s aluminum, this system is SUPER strong and helps pull unwanted heat away from the motor. I re-attached the plastic backing plate followed by the spur gear assembly (I used Axial’s AX31161 32P 64T Steel Spur Gear and AX31164 Machined Slipper Plates in place of the stock parts). These upgrades look awesome and should make the gearbox virtually bulletproof. After I tightened everything up, I went ahead and re-installed the gearbox into the TT.

Step 15

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Time to get the front back together, so I started by sliding the front clip onto the chassis and securing with the 4 screws from underneath as well as the two hinge pins. I made sure to key the center universal into the outdrive located under the transmission. It’s a little tricky, so I would suggest rotating the transmission gears (using the back tires) until you see the slots in the outdrive; this will make it easier to key the universal. Next, I slid the front axles through the steering blocks, attaching the wheel hexes to keep them in place. I installed the steering and camber links, making sure to key the axle bones into the outdrives. A little care has to be taken here to make sure the axle bones stay inside the outdrive.

Step 16

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Now that the front is back on and looking good, it was time to move on to the rear clip and the installation of a lot of performance parts. The first thing I needed to do is separate the rear clip from the rest of the chassis; front cage screws, rear cage screws and the 4-link mounts. If you did it right, this is what you should be left with.

Step 17

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build My first plan of attack is the rear differential. To extract it, I needed to remove the diff cover, the straight axle hub carriers and the axles (just pull them out slightly). I also removed the two plastic diff-capture plates that hold the diff in place. Note the orientation of the diff gear inside the housing.

Step 18

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Replacement of the diff gear and bevel gear is the same as the front. Once completed, re-assemble by inserting the diff gear, diff-capture plates and axles (key and slide back into place). I installed the optional AX30789 AR60 OCP Aluminum Straight Axle Hub Carrier.

Step 19

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build To strengthen the rear end, I replaced the stock plastic 4-link mount with the AX31165 Machined 4-Link Mounts as well as added Axial’s AX31244 Upper Link Plate Set. Both are direct bolt ons; the Upper Link Plate Set uses existing holes in the plastic links.

Step 20

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build I also installed Axial’s AX31245 Lower Link Plate Set. These also bolt right on using existing holes in the plastic links. I would suggest installing and tightening the two end screws while leaving the centermost pair loose. They can be tightened up when you re-install the shocks and anti-roll bar.

Step 21

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Here is the rear clip assembled with all of the aluminum parts installed. You can see I’ve also added the AX31166 Machined Shock Mount Plates, AX30830 AR60 OCP Machined Link Mounts and AX31167 Machined Sway Bar Clamps. The Machined Sway Bar Clamps are a little hard to see, but I’ve added some additional pictures at the end that help show their install. When re-attaching the rear clip back to the chassis, add some threadlocker to the screws that secure the aluminum 4-link mounts. This will help prevent the screws from backing out when you’re out having a good time.

Step 22

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build While I loved the look of the King shocks, I couldn’t pass up installing a full set of Axial’s Icons. Per the included instructions, I built a set of front and rears and installed them in place of the Kings. I have an additional set of shocks to create a dual-shock setup, but I’m going to give it a whirl with the single shocks first. The dual-shock install (and tuning) will be for a later article. As you can see from the pictures, the aluminum parts look awesome and will provide additional strength as well as give the truck a bit more of a ‘factory’ look. Time for me to get outside and get this thing dirty!

Here’s the list of parts used in this article.

AX30395 Heavy Duty Bevel Gear Set – 38T/13T (x2)

AX30789 AR60 OCP Aluminum Straight Axle Hub Carrier

AX30829 AR60 OCP Machined Low-Profile Differential Cover

AX30830 AR60 OCP Machined Link Mount

AX31135 Universal Axle Set 94mm

AX30836 Aluminum Servo Horn 25T

AX31136 Icon 87-125mm Aluminum Shock Set

AX31156 Machined Adjustable Motor Mount

AX31161 Steel Spur Gear 32P 64T

AX31164 Machined Slipper Plate

AX31165 Machined 4 Link Mounts

AX31166 Machined Shock Mount Plates

AX31167 Machined Sway Bar Clamp

AX31169 Machined Body Post Mount

AX31170 Machined Front Shock Tower

AX31172 Icon 67-90mm Aluminum Shock Set

AX31244 Upper Link Plate Set

AX31245 Lower Link Plate Set

AX31249 Yeti Turnbuckle Set

Additional Photos Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build IMG_0552 IMG_0557 IMG_0555 IMG_0556

AWCC 2011 Media

RCCRAWLER.com:
RCcrawler.com has the official section for all things AWCC and there are some awesome photo threads in there!:
http://www.rccrawler.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=199

RC DRIVER MAGAZINE
Tony Phalen and Greg Vogel of RC Driver Magazine where on hand and HAD A BLAST!
Here is Tony’s Driver Blog:
http://find.rcdriver.com/adventure-at-the-2011-axial-west-coast-championships

CAR ACTION MAGAZINE
Matt Higgens, Editor In Chief at RCCA was on hand doing live feed info to the RCCA website:
http://www.rccaraction.com/blog/category/topics/event-coverage/awcc-2011/

RC Car Action Photo Blog
http://www.rccaraction.com/blog/2011/07/05/awcc-photo-gallery/

Matt and Scott also met up with Axial’s own world famous Scott “Squirrel” Hughes for a brief interview:
http://www.rccaraction.com/blog/2011/07/07/axial-racings-scott-hughes/
Boy, he really is getting on with age and wit these days…

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