Axial R/C to support Inaugural Silver State 4wd & UTV Jamboree

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
Axial R/C to support Inaugural Silver State 4wd & UTV Jamboree

Axial R/C Inc., A subsidiary of Hobbico Inc., is proud to announce a marketing partnership with Carrera Performance Group LLc. The Axial R/C team will be headed to Reno, Nevada for the week of July 14th through July 18th attending the inaugural Silver State 4wd & UTV Jamboree for a week full of adventure!
The Silver State 4wd & UTV Jamboree (SSJambo) is a first year event catering to everything adventure and off road. Located in Northern Nevada, this event is packed full of reasons to spend a week exploring and enjoying the outdoors with friends.

The week kicks off on Monday July 14th with an Off Road Business Association (ORBA) OHV leadership summit. This is where some of the most influential minds get together to shape the future of the off highway community. This is also one of the most active groups fighting to keep public lands open for off highway recreation.

Tuesday July 15th starts with the Genright Tour to Virginia city for sightseeing to include the Comstock, the first major Silver Ore discovery in the United states. The day will end with the RallyVenture welcome party.

Wednesday July 16th marks the start of the RallyVenture. The RallyVenture is just like a RECON G6 for full size rigs. Axial is one of the 25 teams invited to participate in this invite only inaugural event. The full size SCX10JK will be piloted by Axial staff as they attempt to make history in Nevada!

Thursday July 17th will have Axial on the move again following our trusty partners at Poison Spyder Customs to Virginia City to explore the oldest Silver mining town in Nevada. The “Bucket of Blood” Saloon will be one of the highlights, known for its violence back when the mining town was running at full steam.

Friday July 18th will be qualifying day for the Hellsgate Grand Prix, an Unlimited 4wd Racing event to be held at Wild West Motorsports park. It will also be the day Axial and CKRC set up a booth for Saturdays racing action.

Saturday July 19th Axcial and CKRC will be on site with a booth showing off Axial R/C vehicles to the masses that arrive to spectate the inaugural Hellsgate Grand Prix. The Hellsgate Grand Prix will provide a ton of entertainment all day long with sidexside racing, Unlimited 4wd racing and the Deathbox derby.

For all the details on this inaugural event, please visit www.silverstatejamboree.com

About Carrera Performance Group LLc.

Off-Road History: Jeff became an “off-roader” in 1975 with his first dirt bike, a Honda Mini Trail 50. His parents were members of an off-road club called the “Looney Duners” in the 70s and 80s and many of his childhood weekends were spent out at Glamis, where his step-mother’s father had a business called “Boardmanville Trading Post”. Growing up in Menifee, California afforded Jeff the opportunity to do a lot of motorcycle riding. He met his wife, Angie, in high school and after graduation, they began riding trails and camping around Southern California. They raised both of their children in the back of Jeeps and Angie recalls changing many a diaper in the front seat of one. They have owned Jeeps and other off-road vehicles continuously throughout their 22 year marriage and have founded several off-road clubs including the Safari Club, Riverside Off-Kamber Club and Inland Jeep Freeks.

Racing: Jeff began racing BMX bikes at the age of 10. He has raced under many sanctioning bodies in several different classes. He has raced Best in the Desert, MORE, SCORE, and MDR series’. He has raced Jeepspeed, class 3000 and class 4400. He has written rules for BITD class 3000 and 4400, as well as rules for Side x Side racing under the International Side x Side Association (ISA). He has created two different sanctioning bodies for racing, the California Rock Crawlers Association (CRCA) and Ultra4 Racing. He is co-founder of the world famous “King of the Hammers” race held in Johnson Valley, CA each February.

Jeff has also developed and published strategic plans for the Off-Road Business Association and the California Motorized Recreation Council on Johnson Valley. In addition, he is a regular contributor to OffRoadPress.com and SEMA E-news. He contributes freelance for Crawl Magazine, DirtSports Magazine, Pirate4x4.com and Off-Road Industry Magazine. In 2013 Jeff Knoll published a whitepaper called “Common Ground” that became the basis for Legislation that passed the House of Representatives and as of this writing is being debated in the Senate. The bill would establish the first of its kind Congressional protected OHV area, and save the largest OHV area in the United States

About Axial

History
Founded in 2005, Axial R/C, Inc. has quickly become a global brand leader of hobby grade radio controlled products. We manufacture chassis and accessory products to the highest quality standards, with design emphasis on rugged construction and scale realism. Axial is regularly involved in local and national events which allow us to keep our finger on the pulse of R/C culture, thus earning us many awards over time, including “Best Truck”, “Most Innovative”, “Best Engineered Product of the Year”, and “People’s Choice.” Axial and the talented staff behind the brand live and breathe R/C, striving for excellence year after year.

MISSION
Axial is a company of enthusiasts for enthusiasts. The passion for the automobile runs deep within the Axial team. The brand itself is a culmination of a top shelf design team coupled with an executive and marketing staff with their finger on the pulse of what is hot and trending in the world of motorsports. Here at Axial we pride ourselves on developing extremely high end radio control models of vehicles that you are likely to see in the great outdoors. These models are designed to generate a tremendous amount of reliable fun that can be experienced by the whole family. Our design team prides themselves on marrying real scale looks with top level performance. Our marketing team ensures Axial is on the forefront by developing partnerships with top quality brands of the full size enthusiast market. Whether you are a beginner looking to further your knowledge about basic vehicle dynamics or a seasoned hobby veteran, Axial offers a platform for you to personalize and enjoy in every environment. The Axial team encourages you to get outside and have some family fun.

Custom Rock Sliders

Here’s a few tips on making your own custom length rock sliders out of stock plastic Axial rock sliders that are included with all SCX10 vehicles. The stock sliders look great and are fully functional. But, for a few of my custom builds the rock sliders are too short to use, when compared to the length of the body’s rocker panels. I have been wanting to extend the stock rock sliders for these projects, but never got around to it. Brandon recently extended a set for one of his custom builds and they turned out pretty nice. So, I decided it was time I modded a set for myself to see how it would work. Here are a few tips to help anyone that wants to attempt this same modification.

You will need 2 sets of rock sliders to make one extended set. First thing I did was cut the rock sliders as needed. To get the length I wanted I needed to leave 7 holes in front half and 4 holes for the second half.

After I cut the sliders to length I drilled holes in the ends that were cut. I than wallowed out the holes with a drill bit so they would be tapered.

Using some plastic from an old parts tree I made some pins to press into the 2 halves of the rock sliders.

Now you will need to check the fit of the mating part. Chances are you will have to do some more trimming on the pins to make everything line up properly. Take your time here and check the overall fit often. Once everything lines up, you can use some tire glue to join the two halves together.

I had to drill new holes in the frame for the rock slider’s mounting tabs, since the sliders are now longer the mounting points on the frame rails have to be re-located.

Overall shot of the finished product.

Body Tech – 2012 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon Kit

Now that the “kit version” of Axial’s 2012 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon has been released I wanted to go over some tips on painting and assembling the body. This is Axial’s most detailed body to date, with several plastic bolt on accessories. There are numerous holes to be drilled in specific locations for all the “bolt on” accessories. This post is meant to help show people what order to assemble / paint this new body to get the best results. So, let’s get started!!

For this body I wanted the cut lines to be really clean, so instead of using standard Lexan body scissors, I used a new X-acto knife to cut out the body and hardtop. This method works great, but you have to be very careful not to veer off your intended cut line. Take your time and you shouldn’t have any issues. So, the first thing I did was use the knife to cut the hardtop lines.

Slowly follow the cut lines on the hardtop with the X-acto. You don’t have to push down very hard either. You are not trying to cut through the Lexan, you just want to score it with the blade.

After I have scored the body lines, I used Lexan scissors to rough the body out. Here you can see I stayed away from the finish cut lines with the scissors.

Once the excess Lexan is cut away you can start peeling the last bits of Lexan away from the body. You will basically be tearing the body on the score lines you created with the X-acto.

Here you can see the hardtop is cut out and ready for the next step.

Now add your window masks, and label the paint scheme if needed. I am using white and black for this particular body.

Next I cut the windshield out with scissors and applied the paint mask for the window.

Using the X-acto method again, I cut the main body out as needed. Then, I applied the paint masks for the headlights and turn signals because I want to add lights down the road.

Using a body reamer go ahead and ream the roll cage mounting holes around the interior to fit 3mm hardware.

Now assemble the roll cage complete.

Go ahead and bolt the roll cage to the body.

Out back the roll cage has a spare tire brace incorporated into the cage. Just loosen it up a little and flip it up and out of the way for now.

Now we will fit the hardtop to the body to mark the screw holes that hold the top into place. I used electrical tape on the sides of the body and hardtop to hold the top while I fine tuned it’s fit on the body.

At this point I took the time to mark any areas that may interfere with final assembly with a marker. Here you can see the hardtop lines will need to be trimmed a bit to clear the screws that hold the windshield in place.

Before you mark any holes to be drilled in the top, make sure your body lines match up on both sides.

Once all the body lines are properly lined up, go ahead and tape the top down to the main body, and mark the holes for the hardtop with a marker.

After the holes are all marked, remove the top and drill the holes as needed. Be careful not to go too big with these holes, as the screws for the top are smaller than the standard M3 hardware.

At this point I went ahead and notched the front of the hardtop to clear the windshield screws.

Now set your windshield in place and mark the holes to secure it to the roll cage.

Be careful drilling these holes as well, since there isn’t much excess material to work with. The hole should fall right between the molded studs in the windshield frame.

Now we can assemble the hard top, body and windshield to make sure everything fits properly.

Looking good!! At this point you can remove the hardtop and flip the spare tire brace back down. Slide the hardtop back into place until the brace touches the rear window and mark the hole for the brace to come through. Then, ream your hole to size so it slides over the spare tire brace.

Now we can turn our attention to the smaller details like tail lights, mirrors, shifter, steering wheel, etc. I used calipers to measure the distance between the molded stud on the tail lights and the mounting hole.

Next, I went ahead and marked the body with my calipers for where the tail lights should sit. We will drill our holes on that scribed line the proper distance apart.

The side of the tail light should sit almost flush with the outside of the body, so mark your holes as needed.

Test fit parts as you go to ensure proper fit.

We will take the same steps to mount the mirrors as we did to mount the tail lights. Measure the spread between the molded stud and the mounting hole on the mirror.

I measured from the top of the half door down .300, or just over a 1/4″, to the first hole for the mirror. Then moved down another .200 per my measurement, so the bottom hole is 1/2″ from the top of the door.

To keep the holes in line, I measure another .300 from the door seam to the mirror holes.

Ream your holes and double check the fit.

Now it’s time to mark the holes for the Poison Spyder Crusher Flares. I found the best way to do this was to use the plastic backing for the flares as a template to mark the holes. Set the proper back plate in place on the inside of the body, line everything up, and carefully mark your hole locations. You can also tape them in place, then mark the holes, to ensure they don’t move on you.

Holes marked……..

………and drilled.

Next up are the body mount holes. Set your body in place on top of the body posts, and carefully line it up front to back, and side to side.

Mark the body mounts on the outside of the body with your marker.

Partially ream the holes out and double check to make sure everything lines up properly.

If everything looks good, drill the holes out to size.

Last few items to take care of are the steering wheel, and shifter. To mark the steering wheel hole I just used my calipers to find the exact center of the panel the wheel mounts to, and marked it.

Drill your hole and double check the fit.

To mark the shifter holes, I held the shifter up to the inside of the body and marked the holes as needed.

And done!!

Now, we get to take the entire body apart, and remove all plastic accessories. Tedious yes, but needed to get a clean finished product. Now it is time to start painting. I chose white and black for the colors on this build to give it that “Stormtrooper” affect. I think Mr. Lucas would be proud!

I started by laying down a few good coats of rattle can white to the inside of the body, windshield and hardtop.

You will notice that some spots, like this seat, on the body aren’t covered with white very well. Most of those areas will be painted flat black on the outside of the body later. So, I didn’t worry about getting complete coverage in those areas.

After the coats of white were dry, I backed everything in black, like I usually do.

To paint the interior flat black, I cut the over spray film out of the interior area only with an X-acto. Then, carefully peeled it away so it didn’t pull any areas I don’t want painted away from the body. Take your time here as well. After you spray the interior, peel the rest of the over spray film off the body and it should look like this.

I followed the same procedure for the interior, as I did for the hard top. Cut the over spray film as needed, and peel it away before painting the flat black. I used a second set of window masks on the outside of the windows on the hardtop, so the windows will remain clear after paint. But, you can just leave the over spray film on the windows by cutting around it with your X-acto and use that as your paint mask.

Remove all window masks at this time. I used the tip of my knife to peel a corner up enough to grab with my fingers.

Notice I have a little white bleeding through the rear windows.

I used a marker to cover the paint, and once the window decal is in place it will still look pretty clean.

Apply the window decals.

Next we will apply all interior decals.

For the seats I tried something different. I only cut the center of the seat decals out with my knife and applied the center portion only.

Apply the exterior decals next.

Don’t forget your mirror and tail light decals.

Attach the tail lights to the body.

Install the steering wheel, don’t forget the Jeep decal that goes in the center.

Shifter installed.

Apply the windshield decal.

Before I bolted the Crusher Flares on I used my marker to color anything that will be inside the wheel well black, just for a cleaner look.

Now we can bolt the cage into place, add the windshield and install the hardtop. Notice there is a small white strip between the hardtop and the black rear quarter panel stickers. To fix this, I removed the top and broke out my trusty black marker and colored that strip of white in. You could also use vinyl, or electrical tape to cover it too.

If you find the sides of the hardtop wanting to bow out away from the body, you can use double stick tape on the tops of the doors to hold them tight.

The finished product.

Whew! That covers detailing your new Axial SCX10 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon kit body. A few things I would have done differently. One, make sure you get your base color of paint up inside the tops of the doors as best you can. This area’s coverage was a little thinner than I expected it to be, and you can see some shading from the black paint at certain angles. Two, I would have left the sides of the hardtop a little longer and trimmed after paint. The black paint left a shadow along the bottom of the sides. Not critical stuff, but just a few things to keep in mind. Good luck with your build and post it up on our Facebook page when you are done, we would love to see it.
http://www.facebook.com/axialinc?ref=hl

Axial “SCX10JK” s-POD Source and Rigid Industries Lighting

We have been slowly working on finishing up some final touches to the SCX10JK. As we all know, the work is never really done on a trail rig, but it is cool to get to that point where everything is in good working order, and you have some time to do some stuff that has been on hold. In our case, it was time to look at turning night into day.

While doing an extensive amount of research about off road lighting, we found this company called Rigid Industries. These guys are at the forefront of the LED light bar movement. It appears as though many of the lighting companies are going the way of LED, and most looking at the low profile option of light bars instead of the traditional round lamp and reflector housings. At the front of this pack sits Rigid Industries, innovating and setting the benchmark. The light bars they have developed have paved the way for almost every off road light manufacturer. The Jeep JK has been the most popular vehicle to showcase this lighting option, so there are lots of options for Rigid lights and mounting systems.

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Once again we headed over to Rebel Off Road to discuss these options for our JK. While discussing the options for the lighting the subject of power distribution arose. Rebel promptly recommended the s-POD Source.

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The s-POD Source is a dream come true for those looking for the perfect way to power accessories without having to build a complicated wiring system or worry about having a negative effect on the factory wiring. Most new vehicles these days have a very sophisticated wiring system that is built for diagnostics. This means that almost every wire is monitored in the amount of current that passes through it. This means any extra demands of that wire over and above its intended purpose will throw a code warning the driver that there is a potential problem with the vehicle wiring system. The s-POD Source is designed to take power directly from the vehicle’s battery and distribute it to 6 potential aftermarket options. This was exactly what we needed!

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We promptly ordered up the components to get the job done to include:
[1]s-POD Source
[1] Rigid Industries 50” E-Series Light Bar Combo
[1] Rigid Industries 10” E-Series Light Bar
[3] Rigid Industries Dually lights
[1] Poison Spyder Roof light bar mount
[1] Set Poison Spyder A-Pilar light mounts
[1] Fairlead mount for bumper light

Once the components arrived, we sent all the parts and the Jeep to Rebel Off Road to be outfitted. To start, Rebel mounted the s-POD and ran all the wiring, as well as mounted the mounting brackets for the lights
The Poison Spyder A-Pilar Mounts

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The Poison Spyder front Fairlead mount

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The s-POD comes with a direct fit mount for the Jeep JK vehicle.

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You simply hook up the positive and negative included wiring, and you are ready to power whatever you want.

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There is then 1 wiring harness that you run inside the vehicle to a vehicle specific switch panel. This panel for the Jeep JK is placed in between the sun visors, a perfect out of the way spot, yet easily reachable by the driver.

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The next step was to run the wiring to the lamp locations. Here is a shot of the a-pilar wiring location. Notice the awesome waterproof plugs that are provided with the Rigid Industries Lights

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With the wiring completed and the brackets in place, it was as simple as bolting the lights up and plugging them in!

The A-Pilar lights are small but offer a ton of light, as well as some quick side to side aiming options

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The 10” E-Series light mounted on the front bumper is a great light to illuminate what is directly in front of the vehicle

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The roof mounted Rigid Industries 50” E-Series lamp puts out massive amounts of light, and will be used to illuminate longer distances for higher speed night travel. This combo bar offers reflectors that also light up to the side of the vehicle for a wide range of viewing at night. It is mounted to a silver powder coated Poison Spyder LED bar mount.

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We are very much looking forward to hitting the trail at night, now that we will be able to see! These things even blind you during the day time!!

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For more information of these great products, please visit Rigid Industries here and s-POD here

To get the history on the Axial “SCX10JK”, please check out the following links! Be sure to check back often, as we will continue to build up the SCX10JK and fine tune it for maximum performance!

Axial “SCX10JK” Wilwood Brakes- Massive Stopping Power!

Axial “SCX10JK” tested – Moab, Utah for Easter Jeep Safari 2012

The Full Size Connection

Axial 2012 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon Unlimited

Axial Visits Rebel Off Road

Axial “SCX10JK” – Icon Suspension

Axial “SCX10JK” Armor – Poison Spyder Crusher Flares and Crusher Corners

Axial “SCX10JK” Armor – Poison Spyder Rocker Armor and Rocker Knockers

Axial “SCX10JK” Armor – Skid Plates from Rebel Off Road

Axial “SCX10JK” Walker Evans Wheels – Maxxis Tires – Rebel Roof Rack

Axial “SCX10JK” Armor – Poison Spyder Front and Rear Bumpers – TJM Winch

Scale Details – SCX10™ 2012 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon

Axial’s latest SCX10 release is an officially licensed 2012 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon. It is an RTR vehicle, which means it is ready to go as soon as you remove it from the box. The detail and realism of this latest release is awesome to see in person. The molded plastic rollcage, fenders and bumpers are all realistic features you would see on any hardcore 1:1 trail rig. Also included are molded plastic tail lights, side view mirrors, steering wheel, gear shifter, D-rings and even a fuel filler assembly for the Fuel Safe fuel cell which adds even more realism to the overall look.

For this article I will cover how you can add a little more detail to your new SCX10, with parts that are included in the RTR box. I will also go over a few other mods that you can make that require no out of pocket cost and really add to the overall look of your new Jeep.

One of those mods that can be done for free is cleaning up the inner fender wells front and rear. You will notice some extra Lexan around the inner fender wells, where the Poison Spyder Crusher Flares meet the Lexan Jeep body. We will trim this excess Lexan away to give the inner wheel wells a cleaner look.

First thing we want to do is use a marker inside the body to color the excess Lexan that hangs below the Crusher Flare’s inner plastic mount.

Once all 4 inner wheel wells are marked, you can remove the Crusher Flares with a 1.5mm driver.

Now you can see your cut line is clearly marked on the inside of the body.

Use a pair of curved body scissors and a sharp X-acto to clean up the excess Lexan. Be sure to leave plenty of meat around the mounting holes, you will only be trimming away a small amount of excess Lexan.

After the trim job is complete.

Next I used my marker again to color what little excess body still remained, and hide the silver from being seen once the flares are bolted back into place.

Now you can bolt your flares back up on all four corners. It looks a lot cleaner now.

Next we will add some detail to our SCX10, with parts supplied in the RTR box. In the plastic parts bag that comes packed in the RTR box you will find a molded plastic fuel filler cap.

Installing the fuel cap, and other scale details, will be easier with the roll cage removed.

Using a 2mm driver remove the eight screws that hold the cage to the body.

Now set the fuel cap in place on the tank to sort out exact placement. I am going to mount it centered left to right on the fuel cell, and slightly closer to the rear of the gas tank.

I measured the overall distance between the molded studs on the bottom of the fuel cap. These stud help hold the cap assembly in place, and you will need to drill clearance holes for them in the fuel cell.

Now, using my calipers again, I measured the overall width of the center section on the fuel cell to find center.

Cut your previous fuel cell dimension in half and mark the center point with a marker.

Our spread on the molded studs from the fuel cap assembly was about .600 of an inch. Cut that in half and you get .300 of an inch from the stud to the mounting hole in the center of the fuel cap. Measure .300 out from the mark on the center of your fuel cell to get your drill points. Mark those points with a marker and drill them out with a body reamer.

Take your time when drilling / reaming the holes. Make sure you test fit the fuel cap assembly as you go. Once everything fits properly, you can move on to the next step.

Before we bolt the cap assembly into place, I will add the officially licensed Fuel Safe fuel cell sticker included in the RTR box.

Using an X-acto gently trim away the small pieces of the fuel cell sticker covering the body mounting, and fuel cap mounting holes.

Insert the fuel cap assembly into place on the fuel cell and secure with a short M3 screw. I used a shorty plastic self tapping screw to tie the cap to the tank. If you don’t have a really short screw, you can use something longer if you have a spacers to take up the extra slack. The screw I found was slightly longer than needed, so I used an old SCX10 shock piston as a spacer.

All done!

Next we will add a few more interior details, with decals that are supplied with the RTR. Remove the molded plastic gear shifter located between the front seats.

Located the interior decals on the sticker sheet.

Apply the decals to the center console and arm rest.

Use an X-acto to cut the mounting holes for the shifter.

Bolt the shifter back in place.

The sticker sheet even includes a Jeep decal for the center of the steering wheel.

Last thing we will add is the exterior hinge stickers for the doors and the rear tailgate.

Now we can bolt the roll cage back onto the body.

Close-up shots of added details.

Stay tuned for more……

Axial “SCX10JK” – Wilwood Brakes – Massive Stopping Power

The Full size Axial SCX10JK has been quite an amazing project for us to be a part of. When doing the extensive research for the scale version we were working on, we learned a lot about Jeep, the history and heritage. This particular vehicle is probably one of the most popular off-roaders on the planet. With that said there are endless options to personalize and modify your Jeep to your liking just like your scaled down SCX10. The similarities in regards to the way you go about modifying your SCX10 is just about the same as the full size version. For instance when you install larger tires, you must consider installing a stronger servo to turn and stronger drive-line components to handle the extra traction. The same goes for the full size Jeep.

We did extensive research into the Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon and the best ways to make a fun and reliable Jeep to take out on some fairly advanced trails. As the modification process goes, one must take into consideration the effect of the modifications made and chase the inevitable “next weakest link”. After adding the Rock Jock 60 Axles from Currie Enterprises, and the body armor from Poison Spyder, the Jeep gained a little extra weight. These mods are essential for making sure the Jeep can be pushed to the limit in terms of traversing hardcore trails without damage, but adding this weight effects the Jeeps ability to accelerate and stop. We decided to focus on the stopping end of the equation first and turned to our friends and technical partners at Wilwood to address the stopping power.

Wilwood has been around for many years providing stopping power for all types of motorsport vehicles and street vehicles alike. After a quick conversation with Mike Hamrick of Wilwood and John Currie, we were able to develop a game plan to make a brake system for the JK. John Currie got to work making a caliper bracket to fit the Rock Jock Axles and to work with the technologically advanced radial mount Wilwood calipers. Dylan Evans from Icon Vehicle Dynamics was kind enough to open his facility up to do the brake install. Icon has machines in house that will allow us the ability to do some machining if need be. This was a first time install with prototype parts, so we wanted to be prepared for anything!

We started by picking up the brackets from Currie, These are billet aluminum and very nicely machined!

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Next we opened the goodies from Wilwood. These parts were modified from off the shelf parts. The bolt center was modified to the 5 on 5.5 pattern as well as the center bore opened on these rotor hats.

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These rotor hats were then bolted up to these massive slotted Spec37 Rotors

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Wilwood offers a proper bolt set to attach these two components:

The assembly process only takes minutes!

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Once assembled, you can see that these rotors are significantly bigger than the rotors we removed. We had previously replaced the rotors before with the slotted and drilled units, but it wasn’t quite enough for comfort.

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The old rotor inside the wheel:

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The new rotor inside the wheel:

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Test fitting the rotor on the front hubs:

With the rotors ready to go it was time to mount the bracket on the knuckles.

On to the Calipers, these 4 piston “Superlite” calipers should offer significantly more gripping power than the standard original equipment.

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These calipers are “radial mount” which means that they are bolted in place from the center of the hub outward and cuts down significantly on flex especially once up to temperature. A quick test fit of the calipers reveals a perfect fit!

Next on the list is the brake pads, we are running the Wilwood high performance pads, designed to work with their Superlite caliper.

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These new calipers are awesome for changing pads. There is 1 bolt across the back of the calipers that needs to be removed. Simply slide the old pads out, and the new pads in, there is no need to remove the caliper for this process!

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The last item on the list was the brake lines. Wilwood also offers a very high quality brake line kit to finish off the system.

With the brake lines installed and bled, the only thing left to do was test them out!



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The performance of these brakes are a tremendous improvement over the stock system and over the upgraded rotors and pads alone. The new calipers and rotors from Wilwood offer much more confidence inspiring stopping power. The major difference came with the panic stopping test. If you are traveling approx. 45 mph, we were able to stop in a much shorter distance than before. This is very comforting, as this heavy Jeep needed a little more stopping force. We can’t wait to get out on the trail and test these out. Stay tuned!

For more information about Wilwood, please visit their site here and “Like” them on FaceBook here.

To get the history on the Axial “SCX10JK”, please check out the following links! Be sure to check back often, as we will continue to build up the SCX10JK and fine tune it for maximum performance!

Axial “SCX10JK” tested – Moab, Utah for Easter Jeep Safari 2012

The Full Size Connection

Axial 2012 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon Unlimited

Axial Visits Rebel Off Road

Axial “SCX10JK” – Icon Suspension

Axial “SCX10JK” Armor – Poison Spyder Crusher Flares and Crusher Corners

Axial “SCX10JK” Armor – Poison Spyder Rocker Armor and Rocker Knockers

Axial “SCX10JK” Armor – Skid Plates from Rebel Off Road

Axial “SCX10JK” Walker Evans Wheels – Maxxis Tires – Rebel Roof Rack

Axial “SCX10JK” Armor – Poison Spyder Front and Rear Bumpers – TJM Winch

Axial Visits ICON Vehicle Dynamics

You have probably noticed a lot more full size off-road company names featured on Axial vehicles as of late. These names are not just another marketing ploy, but instead relationships that Axial has developed to bring you the best products we can. We all know that R/C vehicles are scale representations of full size vehicles, so isn’t it natural that Axial would want to work with full size companies to make their products as accurate as possible? There are obviously components that can not be made to scale, due to the abuse that an R/C vehicle will see, which is way more intense than a full size rig would endure. Take an R/C car and let it tubmle off a 10′ rock, which would be scaled to a 100′ rock in full scale, where a full size vehicle would be literally totaled and made into scrap metal; your Axial rig keeps on ticking. So as you can imagine, not all components scale out just right. The theory however, when it comes to suspension geometry and suspension tuning crosses over extremely well. The Axial staff recently ventured out to Riverside, California to have a technical chat with Dylan Evans and company at ICON Vehicle Dynamics so I tagged along to bring you the scoop!

ICON Vehicle Dynamics is a very unique company staffed with some of the most talented suspension development experts in the nation. Headed up by SCORE off road racing champion Dylan Evans, who also knows rock crawling through his membership of the Poly Goats Four Wheel Drive Club of Cal Poly SLO; Evans and company know a thing or two about how to deal with rough terrain at all speeds. As the name implies, this company focuses on the unique characteristics of each vehicles dynamics (forces causing motion), and how to improve that vehicles ability to tackle rough terrain while significantly improving ride quality.

ICON Vehicle Dynamics is further unique due to their manufacturing process, which all takes place “in house” at their Riverside, Ca facility. The ICON Vehicle Dynamics philosophy demands the use of the highest quality raw materials available, construct the products in the USA and deliver to the consumer the best mix of top-shelf product and customer service. This philosophy has made ICON Vehicle Dynamics stand out in a sea of aftermarket companies and has them labelled as the place to go if you demand the best available.

Cool ICON Decal!

Here is a short video they have as an introductory to their company, check it out!

We started out our visit with ICON Vehicle Dynamics in their large meeting room, where we met with the marketing staff, the general manager, and the engineering staff. This gave both companies an opportunity to discuss the similarities between the two companies. It is amazing how we share the same customers and the same passion for the off road lifestyle

After the meeting, we were off to the warehouse and shop area to check out where the magic happens. I made a few pit stops on the way out of the offices to snap a few pictures of some cool stuff I saw laying around.

Very high tech Bypass shock for off-road racing

Our Axial EXO proudly on display!

The SCX10 Honcho articulated in the office

The line-up of Axial vehicles featuring ICON branding

I decided to peak out the windows from the upstairs office and sneak a few shots of the facility from a bird’s eye view.
Check out all those CnC machines!!

Our shop tour started in the warehouse where they house some of the stock, getting ready to be shipped out, It was amazing to see how many different products they stock, and to hear about how the shelves get refilled almost every day as product is shipped out.

The manufacturing side is what really had us drooling! These guys make some really impressive components.

Everything about ICON Vehicle Dynamics, from their design process, to the manufacturing all the way to packaging, is top notch! We were really looking forward to checking out the shock department, as these guys are known for mastering the ride quality as well as performance.

shock shafts for days!!

Bypass shock bodies freshly welded

Mounting sets ready for assembly

Resivoirs ready to be added

Here is Dylan discussing shock tuning with Axial’s Jeff Johns, Matt Kearney, Brandon Coonce and Jamie Seymour.

Not sure if you caught our blog on the SCX10JK where we installed the ICON suspension system (If not click here to read it), but we were running and testing some of their compression clicker shocks. We figured since we were here, we should go ahead and remove them to see how they were doing, as well as make a slight valving adjustment. We pulled the SCX10JK up in the shop, and Adrian (shock building master) got to work.

The first step was to remove all of the shocks

Once the shocks were off of the vehicle, Adrian set up the shock dyno, yes I said shock dyno! This is where these guys take technology to the next level to put their experience into scientific numbers.

The numbers from the shock are then placed on a graph in real time on a computer screen

The objective of the change was to make the shocks 25% lighter on the compression valving to make the clickers more effective through their range of adjustment. We found that the SCX10JK never went above 6-clicks even in the harshest of terrain. We had the pleasure of watching Dylan and Adrian work their magic on the Dyno and out in the shop as they dissassembled and re-assembled the shocks for the adjustments. We will let the pictures tell most of the story…

The shock pistons look quite a lot different than the average R/C shock piston. These pistons have valve shims that are designed to flex out of the way of piston holes to let fluid pass. The one unique feature of full size ICON shocks is their very drastic difference in tunability between compression and rebound settings. Were we would normally make changes in the R/C world with oil viscosity, these guys make changes with shims. They have been doing it long enough to know what shim stack will make the desired change, and only have to tear them down once and get it dialed in perfect!

The seal heads are similar to the R/C versions, here is a cut away version of the ICON seal head

Once the shocks are completely reassembled, it’s back to the dyno for a comparison check from the original numbers

Dylan fires up the dyno and then checks the graph on the lap top and confirms they are good to go!

While Adrian re-installs the shocks on the SCX10JK, Dylan, Brandon and Matt discuss some of the suspension tuning Dylan has been doing on his Axial EXO and Wraith. Dylan is also an R/C enthusiast and really gets into the deep technical theory conversation with Matt and Brandon.

It was extremely cool to be a fly on the wall while the head of R&D from both of these companies exchange theories and ideas. It will be very interesting to see where this corroboration leads in the future. One thing for sure, with Partners like ICON Vehicle Dynamics, there will not be an issue gathering insight into the full size world when developing the next Axial vehicles.

Thank you Dylan and Crew at Icon Vehicle Dynamics, we appreciate your hospitality, and look forward to future visits!

Please check out ICON Vehicle Dynamics on the web here.

 

Story by: Recce01
Photos: GCRad1

 

Axial “SCX10JK” – Currie RockJock 60 Axles

As you all know we have been working very closely with our firends at Rebel Off Road to build the ultimate Jeep JK trail rig. As we were going down the list of the must have accessories and modifications, Bond mentioned the drive train. We secured the Jeep Wrangler Rubicon for it’s trail ready reputation. For all intended purposes the standard Jeep JK drive train would suit our needs just fine. The standard Jeep JK Dana 44 axles are well prepared to accept abuse on the trail and deliver the desired relaibility. Bond quickly reminded us that we consulted him and the talented Rebel staff to help to make the “Ultimate Jeep JK Trail Rig”. In order to get the increased reliablilty and ability to one day move up to the sticky compound Maxxis tires he suggested we consider upgrading the axles to the Currie RockJock 60 models.

After a tremendous amount of research and many conversations with the world renowned Currie family, we decided to pull the trigger and secure some of the most beefy axles available for the Jeep JK on the planet. These axles would offer several advantages over the standard axles, which is quite amazing because the standard Dana equipment is far from something to complain about. Taking a moment to dip into some specs on these axles really helped us to see where the major differences are. First and foremost these axles are huge! Huge in the sense that the axle housings themselves are 5″ wider than standard in the front, and 4″ wider than standard in the rear. This alone should help a lot with stability on the trail. Let’s take a look at these housings on the day we picked them up from Currie

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One of the most striking differences between these and the standard axles is the angle of the diff covers. They are kicked back and the covers almost sit on top of the housings. This allows extreme rock crawlers to mash their way through rocks without having to worry about puncturing the diff cover, spilling out all the oil and halting all forward movement.

Here they are, loaded in the back of my truck and ready to be delivered to Rebel. I have to admit, I really wanted to get lost and find myself at my house trying to generate a “good” reason why the housings fell out of my truck and landed under my own Jeep :)

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You can really notice another significant difference with these housings in the above picture. The center sections are cast in a manner that adds a significant amount of extra ground clearance to your trail rig. They are called high pinion housings, that have a special set of gears that allow the pinion gear to come in at a much higher location on the ring gear. That extra gounnd clearance is sure to come in handy on the trail.

The next major difference you will notice is the spindles, these are basically off of a 1 ton truck. They carry some massive u-joints and axle shafts, making the entire drivetrain virtually bullet proof!

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The guys at Currie really keep their ear to the ground and their finger on the proverbial pulse of the Jeep world. They know that Jeep has sold over 600,000 Jeep JKs and decide to make a RockJock system that bolts right into the Jeep Wrangler. This means that all the factory brake components work with the exception of the front rotors (which are included with the axles) and the rear rotors which need to be drilled to the new 5.5 wheel pattern. They simply developed a bracket to adapt the standard calipers, making installation a breeze.

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After dropping off all of the components at Rebel Off Road, I had to hit the road to a trade show in Arizona. As luck would have it, the Rebel guys were on a mission to get the axles installed in the SCX10JK. This is not abnormal for these guys, they dont like having things sitting around the shop for more than a few days. This also means I missed the step by step install of the housings. In this case an axle housing install as direct fit as this one requires little explanation.

I did get lucky enough to secure some images of the Jeep out on the trail testing out the new hard parts. As suspected the Axles worked flawlessly, and really increased the Jeeps stability especially on side hill obsticles. The reliability was as expected, complete perfection!

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After the session out in the mountains the SCX10JK was brought back into the Rebel shop for inspection. It is always best to bring your rig in for a complete inspection and maintenance after really putting it through its paces. This was also a great oppertunity to check out how the RockJock housings were holding up to their extreme duties.
As expected, there were a few scratches and scrapes, but no damage requiring repair.

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There is one key feature of the RockJock housings I haven’t mentioned yet, and that is the integrated skid plate system on the center section of the housing. This part is one of the coolest features on the axles. The skid plate allows the housing to easily slide over obsticles it comes into contact with. The skid plate will see some wear and tear over time, but then it can be replaced keeping the meat of the housing in perfect condition throughout its life of service.

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All in all, Axial is extremely pleased to be running the Currie RockJock axles. We are also looking forward to learning more about the Curries and their long heritage in motorsport. From what we have seen and experienced thus far, this is a family and a company who truly embody the spirit of the four wheel drive enthusiast. For a little more insight on Currie Enterprises and their business, check out this video from their youtube page, very cool guys!

To get the history on the Axial “SCX10JK”, please check out the following links! Be sure to check back often, as we will continue to build up the SCX10JK and fine tune it for maximum performance!

Axial “SCX10JK” tested – Moab, Utah for Easter Jeep Safari 2012

The Full Size Connection

Axial 2012 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon Unlimited

Axial Visits Rebel Off Road

Axial “SCX10JK” – Icon Suspension

Axial “SCX10JK” Armor – Poison Spyder Crusher Flares and Crusher Corners

Axial “SCX10JK” Armor – Poison Spyder Rocker Armor and Rocker Knockers

Axial “SCX10JK” Armor – Skid Plates from Rebel Off Road

Axial “SCX10JK” Walker Evans Wheels – Maxxis Tires – Rebel Roof Rack

Axial “SCX10JK” Armor – Poison Spyder Front and Rear Bumpers – TJM Winch

Axial “SCX10JK” tested – Moab, Utah for Easter Jeep Safari 2012

As we continue to build up our 2012 Jeep Rubicon we couldn’t help but notice the online buzz about Easter Jeep Safari in Moab, UT. The entire Rebel Off Road group were preparing their Jeeps for the event whilst putting time into our SCX10JK project. We decided that there was no better place to test our Jeep’s ability than to hit the world famous Moab rock trails. Moab has long been considered a Jeeper’s paradise, with roads that stretch hundreds of miles allowing people to enjoy some of the most beautiful scenery in the USA. Our “SCX10JK” wasn’t completely finished (is any rig ever really finished?), but we figured it was in a state of completion that would suit traveling the world famous Moab trails, hopefully without drama.

We requested some time from our internal graphics master Scott Roberts to whip up some art for the JK. He was extremely busy with Axial day to day operations, so we requested that he keep it simple and clean. We wanted to make sure our partners had a little exposure on the side of the Jeep as well as adding a little character to our rig. Scott whipped up some nice simple graphics for us and took the time to install them over at Rebel Off Road. Thank you Scott!

The first spot we hit was Hell’s Revenge. This particular trail is strange in that you drive your vehicle on a literal sea of rock. You simply follow the rubber marks from past travelers and negotiate a rollercoaster of winding trails. This place has a surface unlike anything I have ever seen. They call it slick rock, but the reality is… it is anything but slick. Instead it is like sandpaper and offers a tremendous amount of grip. It is possible to walk up near vertical faces in your plain old skate shoes!

There are some very cool breaks in the rock sea where there are winding sand trails

There are also a few ledges you must climb up

Bond from Rebel Off Road was our fearless leader on this run, he and his entire group of Jeepers are all awesome people to roll the trail with.

Bond’s Jeep

My ride for the trip was with Jason from Rebel, this Jeep is so awesome!!!

Here we are stopped for lunch!

To learn more about Hell’s revenge,click here

The next adventure we went on was on a trail called Metal Masher, this has to be one of the most beautiful places I have ever been! This trail winds up the side of a mountain and eventually takes you to a plateau overlooking Beautiful Moab, Ut.

Bond always makes the rounds to discuss what the trail has to offer and makes sure everyone is fully prepared for adventure, Thanks Bond!

Bond and his extremely well prepared JK always takes the bonus lines!

Some of the dry waterfalls and steps you get to drive up on this trail are absolutely amazing!!

This trail is loaded with optional more challenging lines; this was one of those advanced lines, amazing what these Jeeps are capable of!

Bond needed a little help getting over this one, so Jason stepped up to lend a hand :)

The Jeep experience is really cool. When the group reaches an obstacle, they all gather around and watch each other give it a shot. It is awesome to see so many people work together to make sure everyone enjoys their experience!

The terrain of this place is mind blowing!!

Rolling through beautiful Moab with a group of likeminded enthusiasts is surreal, as is the capabilities of this rig, JR… You have a sick Jeep my friend!!

Every time we would stop for an obstacle, the Axial RC rigs would come out and offer the youngsters a chance to get some of their own crawling done!

To learn more about Metal Masher click here.

We have successfully put the Axial “SCX10JK” through its paces, and as projected, it performed flawlessly! The combination of parts we selected to arm this JK for battle, were absolutely perfect! The body protection from Poison Spyder did its job, only experiencing minor scrapes, the wheel and tire combo from Walker Evans Racing and Maxxis offered tons of strength and traction, the Suspension system from Icon flexed when needed and offered excellent ride quality both on road and off road. The Spicer equipped drive shafts propelled us to incredible places, the crew at Rebel Off Road did a tremendous job preparing the JK and guiding us through some of the most incredible terrain on earth! You will have to wait to get a report on the TJM winch and recovery equipment, as of yet, we haven’t had to use it!

To get the history on the Axial “SCX10JK”, please check out the following links! Be sure to check back often, as we will continue to build up the SCX10JK and fine tune it for maximum performance!

The Full Size Connection

Axial 2012 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon Unlimited

Axial Visits Rebel Off Road

Axial “SCX10JK” – Icon Suspension

Axial “SCX10JK” Armor – Poison Spyder Crusher Flares and Crusher Corners

Axial “SCX10JK” Armor – Poison Spyder Rocker Armor and Rocker Knockers

Axial “SCX10JK” Armor – Skid Plates from Rebel Off Road

Axial “SCX10JK” Walker Evans Wheels – Maxxis Tires – Rebel Roof Rack

Axial “SCX10JK” Armor – Poison Spyder Front and Rear Bumpers – TJM Winch

Axial “SCX10JK” Armor – Poison Spyder Front and Rear Bumpers – TJM Winch

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We have been spending an awful lot of time over at Rebel Off Road lately, and who can blame us? All of us Axial RC guys look at this shop like our hobby shop. These guys are constantly working on cool projects. Lucky for us, the SCX10JK is at the top of their priority list. Jason over at Rebel gave us a call letting us know they were in the midst of installing the front and rear bumpers, so we had to roll over and check out the progress….

We selected the front Brawler Lite front bumper and skid found here

For those moments when Jeff finds himself in a pinch, he will call upon the assistance of a 10,000 lb. winch found here

We also selected the JK RockBrawler Rear bumper with tire carrier found here

First things first, we had to strip off the front and rear standard Jeep JK bumpers

Now that the bumpers are off it is time to start installing the Poison Spyder equipment. Rebel started with the front bumper and skid plate. Rebel sent the bumpers out to have them powder coated in a black to match the fenders and sliders.

Of course the team at Rebel installed the new “Stealth” series 10,000lb 7 HP winch from TJM. this winch is all new, and ready for extreme duty!

The final product is awesome! The Poison Spyder Brawler Lite bumper offers a significant improvement over stock allowing for an increase in approach angle, as well as leaving both front tires completely clear of any bumper, so those moments where a front tire must climb a vertical face there is nothing standing in the way!

The RockBrawler rear bumper and tire carrier was next on the Rebel priority list. This poison Spyder product, just like the other components were powder coated in a semi-gloss black before installation. The first portion of this process involves installing the main bumper blade. This is a relatively simple process and is completely bolt on.

The spindle of the swing out spare tire carrier is beefy. Beefy is actually an understatement, this think could hold and swing a tank without sagging :)