AX90046 SCX10 II Jeep Cherokee Kit Build Series – Part 3

AX90046SCX10II_JeepCherokeeKit_Build_Series_Part3
Up next in the build series is assembling the links. Probably one of the best parts of the build, am I right guys?! Well, it might not be everyone’s favorite because it is some repetitive work, but what brightens up this particular job is that this kit comes with aluminum links which is preferred over composite links. This is some simple work but there are a few tips and tricks we can pass along.

TOOLS NEEDED
2.0mm hex driver
Side cutters

STEP 1
Axial Kit Build1
As always its best to gather the parts bags you’ll need and run through the steps in the manual quickly to help identify any details that require extra attention.

STEP 2
Axial Kit Build2
A little tip we like to pass along is to arrange the aluminum link tubes in size order so you identify them a bit easier as you go through the build steps.

STEP 3
Axial Kit Build3
Find the aluminum tubes used for the first link assembly. If you’re unsure of what size tube to use, you can place it on the 1:1 drawing to find the correct size.

STEP 4
Axial Kit Build4
Take a close look at the instructions to identify what rod ends you’ll need. There are a number of styles, some on angles and some are straight. You want to make sure the part number in the manual matches the rod end you use or there could be some suspension bind if you use the incorrect rod ends.

STEP 5
Axial Kit Build5
Using the 2mm hex driver, screw the set screws into the rod end until you just feel them bottom out.

STEP 6
Axial Kit Build6
Screw the rod ends into the aluminum tubes. Make sure the final locations of the ends match the illustrations in the manual.

STEP 7
Axial Kit Build7
Axial Kit Build8
Next you’ll need to insert the pivot balls into the rod ends. Note, the pivot balls have a large flanged end and a narrow end. Note the way they are installed as illustrated in the manual. Some links have both flanges face the same side while other links have an off-set installation.

STEP 8
Axial Kit Build9
The steering links and pan hard link should now be assembled. You can install them on the axle and steering knuckle with the hardware as indicated in the manual. Do not overtighten the screws. The pivot balls are plastic and can be crushed if you tighten the screws too much.

STEP 9
Axial Kit Build10
Next build the three links that will support the front axle and tie it to the chassis.

STEP 10
Axial Kit Build11
Screw the three links to the front axle, making sure the rod ends are facing the correct way as indicated by the illustrations.

STEP 11
Axial Kit Build12
By now you should have a good understanding of how the links go together. Assemble the four remaining rear links and attach them to the rear axle.

FINISHED
Axial Kit Build14
The link assembly is complete! If you used a hand tool, by now your wrist should be tires and your fingers sore from holding onto the rod ends. Congratulations you’re fitting nicely into the model community. Keep an eye out for the next steps of our build series where we’ll get into building the shocks.

Note: This How To Can Also be Used For Link Sets:
SCX10 II Front Links Set – AX31465
SCX10 II Rear Links Set – AX31466

AX90046 SCX10 II Jeep Cherokee Kit Build Series – Part 2

AX90046SCX10II_JeepCherokeeKit_Build_Series_Part2

Building your AX90046  kit is going to be a great and rewarding experience. You’ll see how each and every piece fits together and you control the build how you want it to be assembled. We’re starting the build at the beginning of the manual of course. This also means we’ll be starting with bag A and will eventually need to dip into some other bags of supporting parts.

TOOLS NEEDED
Axial Kit Build19
Cutters
1.5 and 2.0mm Hex Drivers

STEP 1

Axial Kit Build1

Open Bag A and organize your parts so you can see everything you’re working with.

STEP 2

Axial Kit Build2

Start by assembling the spool and ring gear. The gear is held onto the spool with three M2x8mm screws. Use a small drop of the included thread locking compound on each screw before installing it. Tighten the screws well so they do not back off. Then slip the 7x14x3.5mm bearing onto each end of the spool. Make two of these.

STEP 3

Axial Kit Build3

You now need to search for additional parts outside of Bag A. Look for Plastic Bag 1. This will have the axle parts you need for the next several steps.

STEP 4

Axial Kit Build4

Push the appropriate bearings into the plastic axle housing that support the bevel pinion gear followed by the gear itself. Take the supplied grease, puncture the end and liberally coat the ring gear on the spool with grease. More is better here, but make sure you have enough to coat the axle gears and the transmission gears later in this build.

STEP 5

Axial Kit Build5

Slip the spool assembly into the axle housing. It will only fit in one way. Cap the axle with the cover and the four M2.6x18mm screws. Use a quality 2mm hex driver to tighten the screws to a firm feel.

STEP 6

Axial Kit Build6

Next find the rest of the plastic axle components. When it time to cut them from the parts trees, use a good quality sprue cutter.

STEP 7

Axial Kit Build7

Cut the steering knuckle from the tree and insert the appropriate bearings into the knuckle to support the front universal shafts.

STEP 8

Axial Kit Build8

Push the universal driveshafts into the bearings.

STEP 9

Axial Kit Build9

Turn your attention back to the axles. It’s time to install the C-carriers. Slip the bearing into the axle followed by the carrier and secure it with the screw. Take extra time here and follow the manual. These carriers are installed in a certain way that is well diagrammed in the manual. Failure to install them correctly will result in some funky geometry that will not work well on the trail.

STEP 10

Axial Kit Build10

Slip the assembled driveshafts with carriers into the axle housing. You’ll then use the shoulder screws to secure the knuckles to the C-carriers. Take note of the direction of the parts here too. When screwing in the shoulder screws, make sure they are a bit past snug. Don’t over-tigthen the shoulder screws or you chance stripping out the C-carrier.

STEP 11

Axial Kit Build12

Gather up the parts to complete the rear axle assembly.

STEP 12

Axial Kit Build13

Slip the half-shaft into the axle housing making sure the flat end keys into the spool. Then place a bearing at the end of the shaft.

STEP 13

Axial Kit Build14

Slide the axle extension tube over the half-shaft and secure the part in place with the pinch screw.

STEP 14

Axial Kit Build15

We’re getting close to wrapping up the axle assembly. Locate the link mounts and secure them using M2.6x1mm screws. Tighten these screws firm, they support the suspension links. Install two link mounts on each axle case.

FINISHED

Axial Kit Build18

Here are the assembled front and rear axles. This build blog would also be helpful if you were building the AX31438 AR44 Locked Axle Set for a custom project. Take your time and build the axles right for smooth bind free operation.

AX90046 SCX10 II Jeep Cherokee Kit Build Series – Part 1

AX90046SCX10II_JeepCherokeeKit_Build_Series_Part1
The debate over which style of RC kit is better, ready to run or build kit, may never be resolved, but one thing is for sure, Axial serves up both styles for either type that suits your style. Since Axial builds a lot of projects, the team tends to lean towards a kit to build and well there are some exciting build projects in the works. So while we’re building up a new AX90046 SCX10 II™ 2000 Jeep® Cherokee 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD Kit to use as the base for a build, we charged up the camera to take some pictures along the way of a stock kit build. If you have any questions about building your SCX10 II kit, you’ll be able to reference this build series to get you through any steps. In the first part of this series, we’re going to go over the basics of the kit itself and things you’ll need for the perfect build.

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When you get your kit, the first thing you should do is? Anybody? Empty the box and roll around in the Axial goodness? No that’s just too weird man. The first step is to go through the contents and familiarize yourself with what’s in the box.

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Put your hand on the body, flip the box over and viola! The kit contents all packed up in an XJ shell.

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Here’s the bag you should get into first. The bag with the manual.

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If it’s your first time building a kit, you should read through the manual first. Look at what you need. Take note of hardware sizes. Look at the types of parts. What parts bags go with what steps. A run through ahead of time will minimize miss steps or something else that may throw your build off track.

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When going through the steps, take out some of the parts bags so you know what to look for when you get to that particular step later.

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The need to open a new bag may come at any time.

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Sometimes it’s a good idea to lay out the parts bags in the order you’ll be assembling them.

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Wait! What are these green nubs and the religious item included in the kit? These green domes are course markers. They are put on the trail so you know where to drive your rig. If you get into competitions, you’ll see more of these on the trail. The silver tool is a cross-wrench that will service most hardware nuts on the truck.

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Now let’s get into what you need. With most kits, you’ll need electronics and you’ll need to pick these items up at your local hobby retail store or your favorite online business; Horizon Hobby has all of the gear shown above. For the SCX10 II Kit, you’ll need a radio with receiver, a steering servo, motor, speed control, battery, charger and possible connectors for your ESC.

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Next up on the you’ll need list is tools. There are two examples above. The top is a bit more expensive tool set-up while the set below is a less expensive set that will get the job done too. You’ll need cutters, pleirs, a hobby knife, scissors, hex drivers and even nut drivers to complete the assembly of your kit. Here are some links to the tools above:
Dynamite Metric Hex Driver Set- DYNT2030
Dynamite Nut Driver Set- DYNT2010
Dynamite Start-up Tool Set- DYN2835

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Finally the chemicals you’ll need. Some CA glue such as the thin adhesive shown here from Dynamite for the tires and some paint for the body. Window masks are included with the kit, but if you want to spray your body more than one color, you may need some masking tape to use for your designs.

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No seriously; did you read the manual? Do it, it helps. That wraps it up for the introduction of this build series. Make sure you follow the build each week while we get this truck ready for off-road action.

 

 

How To: Low Cost Blazer Tail Lights

Simple_Blazer_Tail_Light_Install
The AX90058 SCX10 II 1969 Chevrolet Blazer has become an instant hit since it’s release and drivers all over are already taking it out to explore new trails and others are already customizing it with incredible scale detail. A few of the features that many Blazer owners like is the included front LED lights and included AE-5L speed control to power the lights. If you haven’t noticed already, there is an open pigtail on the speed control that will allow you to install an additional set of LED lights. We’re going to show you how to take advantage of that open LED port by installing tail lights on your Blazer. All you’ll need are the light pods included with the kit, some hardware you may already have and a light string you can pick up at your local hobby shop or favorite online retailer.

Axial Blazer Tail Lights 1
You remember that bag of extras that came with your kit? Time to dig it out from under your workbench. Inside you’ll find some parts trees with light buckets and lenses. There are a number of light buckets included, but we’re going to use the small round buckets found on the tree shown above.

Axial Blazer Tail Lights 3
To add LED lights you’ll need to pick up a pack of AX31481 lights that will look similar to the lights above. You’ll also need just a few screws to complete the install. Two 3x6mm button head machine screws (AXA0113) and two 2x6mm cap head machine screws (AXA013.)

STEP 1
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 4 Axial Blazer Tail Lights 5
We’re going to install the tail lights in the rear bumper. The first step is to test fit the lights so you know exactly where they are going. The two photos above show where the light buckets will be located on our Blazer.

STEP 2
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 6
Using a marker, make a mark on the bumper where the indexing pin on the light bucket will go in the bumper.

STEP 3
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 7
Now drill a small hole where you made your reference mark. We actually found that rotating a hobby knife around like a drill will make a nice small hole just right for the bucket pin.

STEP 4
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 8
Now place the light bucket back into place on the bumper, the index pin should go right into the bumper. Make sure the bucket is square in the bumper and then use your marker to make a mark around the mounting boss of the bucket. This will give you an idea of where you need to drill the mounting hole.

STEP 5
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 9
Drill a 3.5mm hole using your marks as a guide. When you’re done, your hole pattern should look like this.

STEP 6
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 11
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 10
Time to assemble your light buckets. Slide the LED light in the bucket, followed by the LED clip over the back of the light and use the 2x6mm screw to secure the clip to the bucket.

STEP 7
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 12
Next press the lenses into the light buckets. TIP 1: Paint the lens red from the backside to give it more of a tail light look. TIP 2: Before pressing the lens into the bucket, use some clear model glue to help secure the lens.

STEP 8
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 13
Here is the tricky part, screwing the light bucket to the bumper using the 3x6mm screw. To do this, we cheated and made an additional hole in the bumper bracket that allowed us to slip a long 2mm ball-end hex driver through the bumper to get to the screw. Screw your light pods to the bumper.

STEP 9
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 14
Things get simpler here. Plug your LED light string into the open port of the AE-5L speed control.

STEP 10
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 15
Use some zip-ties to secure the LED light wires to the chassis cross members.

FINISHED
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 17 Axial Blazer Tail Lights 16
In about 10-15 minutes of time at your workbench, you should have working taillights. Head out to the trails and enjoy the new look of your Blazer on your Axial Adventures.
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 18

Axial Deadbolt and Wrangler CRC Bumper Mod

CRC_Bumper_Mod

As you continue to grow into your Axial SCX10 II and become more comfortable driving the rig, you’ll want to progress your adventures beyond daily driving. When doing this, you’ll start to think more about approach angles to obstacles and this is when things like the scale replica bumper on the truck may hold you back. Sure the bumper looks cool, but it’s overhang may prevent you from getting over some tough terrain. When you reach this point, you might want to consider modifying your bumper. Here we’re going to go over a CRC bumper modification that many seasoned scale drivers are already doing. You’ll need a few basic tools you may already have on hand and just a little bit of time at your workbench. Let’s get started.

TOOLS NEEDED
2.0mm Hex Driver
Lexan Scissors
Drill & 2.5mm drill bit
Dremel tool with sanding drum

BEFORE WE BEGIN
Axial CRC Bumper Mod 2
Before you jump right into your bumper modification, let’s take a look at the stock bumpers position, just so you can see how much it has moved once the mod is complete.

STEP 1
Axial CRC Bumper Mod 3
Using a 2mm hex driver, remove the two screw pins that hold the bumper to its mount.

STEP 2
Axial CRC Bumper Mod 4
Using a marker, mark the area that will need to be cut away from the original bumper in order to move it farther back in the chassis. Note, you’ll want to clear the chassis rails, so make sure you start your marks on the outside of the frame rails.

STEP 3
Axial CRC Bumper Mod 5
Using a pair of Lexan scissors, cut along the line you marked on the bumper. Be aware that there are thin support tabs in the bumper that will need to be cut as well.

STEP 4
Axial CRC Bumper Mod 6
Toss scrap plastic and if you wish, clean up the cut edges on the bumper with a Dremel tool and sanding drum. Be sure to wear eye protection.

STEP 5
Axial CRC Bumper Mod 7
The thin support plastic tabs you cut through before are also located on the top side of the bumper posts. These will need to be cut away too, to allow the bumper to slide further into the mount. Using straight scissors, cut the tab close to the post and close to the bumper plate.

STEP 6
Axial CRC Bumper Mod 8
Now you can “rip” the rest of the little support tabs out with a pair of needle nose pliers.

CHECK YOUR WORK
Axial CRC Bumper Mod 9
With the bumper cut up and the tabs removed, insert the bumper to make sure your cuts were enough. We have plenty of room here to cut the ends of the mounting posts and move the bumper even farther back.

STEP 8
Axial CRC Bumper Mod 10
With a pair of side-cutters, cut the ends of the bumper posts off at the last hole.

STEP 9
Axial CRC Bumper Mod 11
We’re getting close to finishing. Insert the bumper as far back as it will go in the mount, making sure it’s square to the chassis. Take your drill with 2.5mm bit and drill new holes into the bumper posts using the holes in the chassis mount as a guide.

STEP 10
Axial CRC Bumper Mod 12
Grab the bumper mounting screw pins and screw your bumper back in place in the new set back location.

DONE
Axial CRC Bumper Mod 13
The bumper relocation is complete. See how much closer it is to the battery mount? You’ve now reduced the amount of front bumper overhang and should be able to approach steeper obstacles to conquer.
Axial CRC Bumper Mod 14

Skeeno’s Axialfest 2018 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Build

After AXIALFEST2017, I started thinking that I needed to update my trailing rig.  Last year, I built a new racer for for the Altra Ultra 5K Enduro, but I needed something new to run on all the trials at AXIALFEST2018.

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As luck would have it, Brown Santa dropped off some Green Tape just before the Christmas season.  Merry Christmas to me!

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When I opened up the box, it was packed with the new SCX10 2 2017 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited CRC.  This would be a great new trailing rig for AXIALFEST2018!

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My buddy, Mr. Werty over at WertyMade contacted me as soon as he found out I had the new rig.  He wanted to use it as a test mule for some parts he was making; rear bumpers, front bumpers, and rock sliders. Since we’ve been RC nerd friends for many years, I happily agreed to lend him my new trailing rig.

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He returned it to me in even better than tip top shape.  All the parts he test fitted, he left on there for me, score!  I immediately started thinking about the things I wanted to modify and add to improve the performance and looks of the 2017 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited CRC. First up was to get a spare tire and some RotopaX on the rear bumper.

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Mr. Werty repossessed those D Rings, so that was one item I wanted to replace on that sweet front stinger.

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Check out those sweet sliders, indexed to hold the body, just like the stock plastic ones, but these are made out of steel.  The wrench logo in a nice touch, too.

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Next up was a new set of socks and shoes.  I’ve always liked beadlocks and the classic Axial 1.9 Beadlocks were my first choice.  Just as I got the wheels, Werty annouced these new Wrench Rings, and I just had to have a set.

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Look how awesome the rings look.

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In order to add a little crawling performance, I like to add some weight in the wheels to lower the center of gravity.  The Axial Internal Rings are a perfect fit. I also swapped out to a slightly beefier looking tire, the BFG All-Terrains are a classic tire and the KO2 version is even better than the original.

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They mount up easily, and you can adjust the weight using the inserts.

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At this point, I was loving this wheel/tire/ring combo, but I wasn’t digging looking at the electronics through the wheel wells.

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It was starting to look pretty good, but I still had a ways to go.

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Next up, I needed to add some swag to the rear.

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Since I wasn’t using the stock Nitto Trail Grabbers, I pressed one into service as the spare tire.

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Next, I hit up my local hobby shop, CKRC Hobbies and picked up these RotopaX gas cans from Scale by Chris AKA SBC.

IMG_20180411_203425

Don’t worry, the tire rack swings away, so you can still get into the back of the Jeep.

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Another modification I like to do is the 3654 Mod to the wheel hexes.  Eazy Elio from Two Chainz Scalerz taught me this trick to give any Axial scaler a slighly wider stance. Since the stock hexes are about 3mm, this modification adds about 10mm of width to the SCX10 2.

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While I was at CKRC picking up the SBC RotopaX cans, I spotted these brass 8mm hexes from Team KNK. It might be slight, but the brass hexes will also lower the center of gravity slighty.

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They fit perfectly and come with new wheel nuts and set screws to secure them to the axles.

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Next up was adding some wheel wells to hide the electronics.  I used the wheel wells for the original SCX10.

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They aren’t a perfect fit, but with a little creativity with the scissors, they worked out pretty well.

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The curve of the Jeep Wrangler body means you have to trim the fronts quite a bit.

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I ended up trimming that front tab off because I was worried it would hang up on twigs and things on the trail.

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After a little black paint, they look great.

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Black helps hide all the imperfections.

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That’s WAY better than before; no more unsightly wires can be seen under there.

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I almost forgot to mention this cool feature on the WertyMade bumper. Those four holes are for mounting a rear winch if you want one…

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And that hole is a bottle opener for those times when you need to hydrate during wrenching sessions!

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Next, it was time to add a some interior to give it a little more scale look, as well as to hide the electronics a little more.  I heard from the Anthony Rivas of Rivas Concepts and Matt Kett from the Scale Builders Guild that the 2012 Jeep Wrangler body was a perfect fit.

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Sadly, I had to kill a perfectly good body.  If you want to try this, you can probably find an old body from one of your local RC buddies to cut up.

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Be sure to cut around the lights and fender flares.

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The rear view mirror mounting holes make a great mounting point.  The two screws hold the front securely.

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I found that the door handle impressions lined up perfectly and made getting it in evenly easy.

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I cut a big hole to allow for the rear body mounts to pass through.

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Don’t worry, with the tinted rear windows, you can only see it if you are staring directly into the rear windows.

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Looking good so far. Time for paint.

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I wavered between black, red, and silver before settling on the silver.  I was happy with my choice because the bright color makes the interior pop against the red.

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That’s what I’m talking about.  No more unsightly electrics can be seen in there.

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Earlier, I got distracted by that big open space in the front bumper. TIme to remedy that.

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I pulled the winch off my old SCX10 and it mounted up easily.  It even had a matching red hook.

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Oh yeah! that looks way better with the winch in there.

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I found some D rings on some old parts trees to replace the ones Mr. Werty repossessed. I even put one on the rear bumper.

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Back to the interior.  Sticker time!

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I kept it pretty simple in here.  The only thing I added was the steering wheel I had in my parts box.  Low Rider Style with the chain ring.

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Boom!

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Bam! The silver and black really contrasts well against the red.

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There it is mounted up, two screws through the mirror holes and a little tape hold it in.

dsfdfas

There’s the mirror screws holding the mirrors on and the interior in.

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I also found some wipers on the spare parts tree and mounted them up.

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I really like the clean looks of it.

51 She’s just about ready to conquer all the trails at AXIALFEST2018!

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I just wanted to add a couple more scale details.  First I added the molded door handles.

IMG_20180427_203454 (1)

A bonus of the door handles is they also hold the interior in place.

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Then, I added the molded hood latches.  Both of these come on the spare parts trees in the box.

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I had to give it a quick trail run to test it out.

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I must say, this rig handles amazingly well.

58I’m thinking this rig is going to be amazing at AXIALFEST2018!

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One last item before I wrap up this build.  I need a few more lumens than the stock headlights, so I decided to add the JRC Offroad Roof Rack.

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Looks pretty good up there even though it’s originally meant for the 2000 Jeep Cherokee.

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The Rigid Light Bar fits perfectly up there.

IMG_20180514_181714

 

I used the 8 String LED and 3 Port High Output LED Controller.

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I’m really loving the look and capabilities of this rig.

 

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I’m definitely ready to emark on the adventures that Axialfest 2018 holds. I just wish July 18th would get here already!

 

SCX10 II Trail Honcho Truck Tips & Tricks For Noobs

TrailTruck_Tips&Tricks

Getting your RC adventure underway has never been easier with the well equipped, affordable SCX10 II Trail Honcho ready to run. This revival of the original Honcho body, from the famed SCX10, now features an updated electronics package combined with improved SCX10 II platform. It’s aimed at getting anyone into the hobby and on the trails with success. It of course is also a great truck for the seasoned enthusiast. But our focus here is on the many who will pick up an RC transmitter for the first time with the Trail Honcho and we want their first adventure to be the best of many trail driving experiences to come. Here we’ll go over all the basics from the unboxing to checking over your rig for its first run, tips for your first drive and tricks to keep it in proper running order.
Honcho 3

UNBOX
Before just diving into your new RC adventure, take the time to unbox and educate yourself about everything that encompases your new Honcho kit. Inside the box, you’ll need to cut the zip-ties securing the truck to the inner box support. Remove the radio from it’s packaging and dip into the bag with instructions and accessories. The most important step here is to read the manual. Although we’re walking you through the paces here, it is always best to familiarize yourself with the manual in case you have any questions in the future. After your up to par with manual, take a look at what is included with the kit. You’ll find a bag of “extra parts” these parts are unused during the assembly of the kit and may be used for future projects once you get hooked on your Axial adventures and trust us, you will get hooked. There will also be some basic tools in the kit, these should be transferred to your adventure backpack as they make great tools for on-trail repairs. And finally you’ll notice some green “domes” we’ll talk about this later.

Honcho 2
Honcho 1

GET IT RUNNING
We’re moving onto the fun part; getting your Honcho going. First remove the four body clips that secure the body to the chassis, remove the body completely and set it aside. Now you can access the battery tray. At some point at your local hobby shop or online, you’ve purchased a battery and charger for the rig. Locate the battery tray and unhook the Velcro strap. Slide your charged battery into the tray and secure the velcro back in place to retain the battery. Next move to the transmitter and install four AA batteries that you supply into the radio. Power the radio on using the switch on the face of the radio. Now move back to the SCX10 II and plug in the battery. The battery plug is your on/off switch for the truck. Tip: The radio is always on first and off last. Your SCX10 II is now powered up and ready to go after placing the body back on the truck and securing it with the four clips.

Honcho 4 Honcho 5

RUNNING CHECK
Head outdoors and place the Honcho on the ground for a quick systems check. The electronics should be dialed in from the factory, but things can happen. You’ll want to check to make sure your trims are set properly. First is your truck moving on its own when you power it up? If so, you will need to use the throttle trim on your radio to reset your neutral point. Use either button for throttle trim to find the neutral. If you tap the trim on one side and the truck starts moving more, it means you’ll need to use the opposite button to get the throttle back to neutral. Keep tapping the button until the car stops (is at its neutral point.) With the throttle set, check to see if the truck tracks straight. With the vehicle pointing away from you, give the truck a little throttle. Note if the truck tends to “drift” towards the left or right. If so, use your steering trim to find the neutral point of the steering in a similar fashion to the throttle adjustment.
trim
Honcho SCX10 2

GET THE FEEL
Wait! Now that your truck is trimmed, you probably have the urge to pin the throttle and see what the truck can do. We’ll get there. First start by driving slow in a figure eight pattern. This means giving the truck a little bit of throttle trigger input and steering the truck in a figure eight pattern; turn the wheel right, go straight a bit, turn the wheel to the left, repeat. This will help you get a feel for how the steering feels reversed when coming towards you. When the truck is going away from you, steering the radio wheel to the right will always turn the truck to the right, but will feel reversed coming back towards you. Get a feel for the throttle range in both forwards and reverse. Note: the throttle is not an on/off switch and is proportional. In trail truck driving much of your rock crawling adventures will happen at a slower speed.
Honcho SCX10 7

TACKLE YOUR FIRST OBSTACLE
Before going out and driving on the gnarliest terrain you can find, practice on something less harsh. Find small hills or rocks with a slight incline to drive on. First drive straight up and down the obstacle. Note the amount of throttle it takes to make the incline and how the drag brake in the speed control affects the decline. Next drive up on an angle. Like a real vehicle, the trucks center of gravity may want to cause the truck to roll over. Determining the type of angle you can drive on before the truck wants to roll over is all a part of developing driving skill.

Honcho SCX10 6

DRIVE POINTS
With a general feel of how the Honcho drives, you can venture out for tougher obstacles. Find steeper inclines, off-set rock ledges, varying rock surfaces and use your newfound vehicle control to try and get your truck over the terrain. Think about where the wheels need to be places on rocks, how much steering you need to use, how much throttle and where will the truck be positioned when you’ve tackled what’s in front of you. Remember, you need to set yourself up for the next obstacle too. Then it will become time to refine your lines, challenge yourself and that’s where those little green domes come in that you found in the kit. These green things are gate markers and they are set on trail courses for your rig to pass through. They’re usually placed in positions that will challenge your skill. Find challenging parts on your trial and place these markers so you can practice driving through gates.

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ROLL OVERS
What happens when your truck rolls over? Well, in real life, if a truck rolls over, no big hand reaches down from the sky to flip it back over. So, you need to use vehicle control to try and right the truck. If the Honcho is completely upside down, try using throttle and steering to “wiggle” the truck over. Or towards a nearby object. The point is to get the wheels to grab onto something to help pull it back over. If the truck is on its side, you can turn into the ground and give it throttle. This will oftentimes pull the truck out of the roll over and back onto its wheels.

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FIND NEW ADVENTURES
The rest of your driver education is up to you. To improve your skill, try locating nearby parks or even an urban adventure away from the public. Finding new places to have an adventure each time you go out with the Honcho will improve your driving skill. But in the bigger picture, you’re also going out and finding new adventures for yourself. Adventures that will not only build skills and love for a hobby, but will also build memories.
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MAINTENANCE
Once your adventure outdoors is over, you’re not exactly done with your Honcho rig. A maintained rig is always a well performing rig. Take the time to remove any dirt and debris from the truck. A simple 2” paintbrush and a little elbow grease knocking off dirt from the truck can clean it up. Compressed air works as well. If your adventure lead you into the wetlands, take a look at our Driveline Maintenance Tips to help you with your clean-up procedures.
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OPTIONS
At some point, You’ll want to join the custom club. Installing option parts to make your honcho stand out or to make it more durable for the adventures you’ll put the rig through. Here are five option parts we recommend you take a look at when taking your SCX10 II Honcho to the next level.  

Gear Set (48P 28T, 48P 52T)
Part- AX31585
If you read the story of the Honcho taking on the Redonda Ridge Adventure, you saw the rough terrain eventually took its toll on the transmission gears. Luckily this is an inexpensive upgrade up to steel gears if you feel your truck needs it.

Aluminum Servo Horn 25T (Hard Anodized)
Part- AX30836
The steering is among one of the most abused parts of any vehicle. Swapping the stock plastic servo horn for the aluminum option could prevent any unwanted steering issues on the trail.

M4 Serrated Nylon Lock Nut
Part- AXA1046
For obvious reasons the wheels endure a lot of abuse during use. This on occasion can lead to a wheel nut backing off. The locking serrated nuts grab onto the wheels for extra security.

SCX10 TR Links Set – 12.3″ (313mm) WB
Part- AX30550
Although the links on the SCX10 II Honcho have been greatly improved over the previous units on the SCX10, upgrading to aluminum links is a popular upgrade for many adventurers.

Steering Upgrade Kit
Part- AX30426
Like the suspension links, the stock plastic steering link can take a lot of abuse and flex during use. In this set, you can use the long link to upgrade your SCX10 II.

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KEEP IT INTERESTING
With your new found hobby and new found key to adventure, keep things interesting by continuing to drive on new trails, build new courses in your backyard, continually modify and upgrade your Honcho to reflect you, your likes and interests. Every day is a new adventure behind the wheel of the Honcho and can give you new found enjoyment outdoors while learning new sets of skill. When you do conquer a new challenge, be certain to document your experience with a photo on social media and give it the hashtag #AxialAdventures so other adventurers can see what you’re up to.

 

Desert Turtle Racing KOH 2018 Race Recap

Desert Turtle Racing KOH 2018 Race Recap

KOH 2018 Race Week:
First and foremost, we were stoked to be setting up our pits in the Lasernut Laser Town hanger. We arrived at Laser Town and got the Turtle set up in the hanger and set up all our camp stuff. We did a little last minute shock tuning on the Rock Krawler shocks to get them dialed in for race day, then headed over to get registered for the race. Monday was our qualifying day and in practice we discovered that the motor was running not so peppy. We learned that we had to shift to 4-Lo just to get up the hill climb and then shift back into 4-Hi to finish the lap. It hurt our qualifying times a bit but we were still able to get an 11th in class start for Thursday’s race. We also discovered that we had a melted coil pack and spark plug that were causing the engine to run poorly. We were able to get in a run around Lap 1 of the KOH course and mark down some trouble spots on GPS as well as set up our lines to get through the new “Notches” area that Ultra4 added to the course this year. We were feeling pretty good about the course of Lap 1 and the car was running well. We headed out for a pre-run of Lap 2 and got through a couple trails but unfortunately cracked the oil pan on a couple big hits and that caused us to call the pre-running extremely short. A big part of our pit support this year was provided by Dust Junkies Racing and they just so happened to be near where we broke down and gave us a helping hand to get back to Laser Town. We spent the rest of our pre-running time hunting down an oil pan and making repairs to the rig and studying the course map.

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KOH 2018 EMC Race Day:
Let’s just start with, the green flag dropped and we were off and running! Darin was behind the wheel and ready to attack the desert lap. The first few miles had us on edge, knowing that race nerves can cause you to overdrive the rig and/or potentially suffer flats. As we clicked off the early miles we passed many rigs that had suffered exactly that, and a couple others with some quick driving decisions. We were able to maintain a good pace and cruise through unscathed. As we passed by RM12 we felt the rig was doing well. We radioed to Dust Junkies at Remote Pit 1 that we didn’t need a tire change and opted pass through without a stop. They responded with “Well done. We’ll catch you on the flip side at RM48”. We waved on the way by the pits and were feeling great about the rig. We kept clicking off the miles, passing other racers along the way. As we arrived at “The Notches” a little ways past RM24 we followed a couple other rigs into the banner area. Again, we passed a few others that were floundering in the rocks not knowing where to go. We stuck to our pre-planned route and managed to maneuver around a couple more. As we exited, we were on the tail of a 4800 rig and we decided to go for the pass in a whooped-out section to the drivers left. We made the pass, but we also went for a good ride when the front end got bucked pretty high, and we were reminded that we needed to tone it back.

 

We got back on our pace as we rounded the half-way point at RM32, and we continued carrying a good pace, picking our way through the tight desert section before reaching RM47, where we again needed to radio to the Dust Junkies at Remote Pit 1 what our plans were. We chatted for a bit about how the rig was doing, we were not hearing any strange sounds, and we again didn’t need to stop for a tire change. We hit the pit zone and again gave the big thumbs up as we passed by. Heading out crossing the base line we knew the speeds were going to pick up as we rounded the big bend at RM52. Around RM54 we had a close encounter with a bird — this bird was about 20 feet off the deck and clocking us for speed about 50 feet off the front passenger corner of the rig. At least it seemed that close. So we mashed the gas to pick up the pace and see what they would do. We gave them the applause and enjoyed the camera man hanging off the side of the helicopter. Let’s hope it makes the cut into some footage somewhere.

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We reached the intersection at the baseline exit and headed out across the dry, dusty Melville lakebed. At times we couldn’t see much more than a few feet in front of us. Picking our way up into the top of Resolution, preparing for our drop down it and Backdoor, we knew we had just a couple more miles before we were back to Main. We had a bit of a close call at Backdoor — we got in a little bit of a hurry to prevent another rig from passing us and did a great nose pose with the rear tires straight up in the air. We hit the gas to prevent the roll-over and hit the rear bumper hard on the rock wall behind us… BUT we were down and all four wheels and the rig was still moving. We called in to pits that we were down but took a hard hit and would need to look the rig over really well. We made the last of the little climbs before hitting the short course and the Main Pits. At this point we were pretty stoked Darin just had a VERY clean run on Lap 1 and suffered ZERO flats with our Falken tires. We had a feeling that we were sitting in a pretty good position and it was time to change drivers.

And so the race continues… Lap 2 — Randall is now in the driver’s seat and ready to take on the rock sections. Before we got there, we had to run through the first 8 miles of the Lap 1 again, and then around the desert for another 9 miles before reaching Remote Pit 2A. Again, we kept a descent pace intent on not overdriving the rig. As we reached Remote Pit 2A the rig was feeling pretty good and we called in to let them know that we would just be passing by. We headed into the first rock trail, Boulder Dash, and made pretty quick work of it. We headed down Upper Big Johnson and continued across the valley and around to the bottom of Wrecking Ball. While we were in Wrecking Ball we had a few difficulties leading up to the waterfall but cruised right up the bypass line and continued on. At RM85 we headed over to Fissure Mountain to run across the top of the range and down to Sledgehammer. Another new thing for the Ultra4 race this year was the addition of two trails at RM90, Idle Issues and Her Problem, two trails that I did not get to pre-run nor even see. As we approached the trail we saw the trail markers but the terrain looked untraveled and there were no obvious lines. There was no stopping us on this trail we picked it apart, as if we were cutting a new trail. We had a little trouble getting through Chocolate Thunder but were able to keep our cool and get back on track.

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Once we got over into Jack North we felt something strange in the steering and decided we should stop and take a look. What we discovered was the mount on the axle for the Hydro Assist Ram has been torn off and the Ram was just hanging there cycling left and right. We also discovered that all of the drive flange bolts on the rear axle (BOTH SIDES!) had backed out and we were leaking a ton of gear oil. We tightened up the flange bolts, removed the hydro-ram and capped the hydro lines so we could continue the race. We wheeled up to the crux of Jack North and, like a replay of last year, Darin got out and spotted the rigs through and then got us through and we headed for Jack Hammer. The problem with not having Hydro Assist is that every rock the tires come in contact with will jolt the tires one way or another and that makes it very difficult to steer and stay on the line that you need to get over the rocks. Coming down Jack Hammer we made sure to plan way ahead and keep the car on the right line. Heading up the sand hills at RM93 was pretty fun with the new motor screaming as we made our way. We got around to Hells Gate and continued to struggle with the ability to steer and stay on the right line. Thankfully we had a new ZEON 10 winch from Warn on the rig to get us quickly un-stuck when necessary.

We cruised down Devils Slide and headed over into Sunbonnet Pass. We came upon a few other rigs in the trail and made passes when we could but also got stuck a few times, and again had to use the winch to get unstuck. Somewhere in Sunbonnet we got lodged between two big rocks and had to use our jack to get out, which cost us a significant amount of time. At that point we also discovered that we had cracked the oil pan again and it is was dripping. We took some time to look at the leak and see if we could spot the crack. We debated continuing the race with the leak but the concern was, if we cracked the oil pan even worse, we could damage the motor and possibly be stuck in a trail until the race is over. We agreed that we would make our way out of Sunbonnet and then reassess the condition of the rig. It’s always a hard decision to make but we had to make it. We decided to make our way to the stock bypass split at RM100 and call the race. We didn’t want to risk severe damage to the motor and didn’t want a late-night team recovery after the race. We got in touch with our pit crew at Remote Pit 2B and had them relay to Race Ops that we were out of the race at RM100.

Conclusion:
We finished our race as the 1st place DNF, putting us officially in 4th place by progression. Yes, you read that right — There were only three 4500 class rigs that finished the race, and only another nine rigs in the 4800 class. This race was a difficult one — Not because of the number of rock trails or a difficult desert lap, but because Mother Nature has not rained on the Hammer trails in some time, and that caused the dirt to be very dusty and the rocks to be covered in dust, and some holes to be extra deep.

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We would like to give a special thanks to several sponsors – To Off Road Development for providing the shop space for us to get ready for KOH. To Sucuri Security for stepping on board to support the team this year. To Warn for going above and beyond standard customer service to solve our winching issues. To Dust Junkies Racing for providing pit space and pit support at the race. To Lasernut for providing us space in the Laser Town Hanger at KOH. To Rock Krawler for their continued support in our race program. To Falken for providing ZERO flats this year on the Wildpeak M/T tires. And to our DTR team… Without them we would not be able to do what we do. We are a team that is more like a family and we are all in it together. Even though we did not finish, we did not lose. We come away smarter and stronger. We are still a young team and we continue to learn at every race.

Thanks to all of our sponsors for your continued support: Rock Krawler Suspension | Falken Tire | Sucuri Security | Axial Racing | Poison Spyder Customs | Raceline Wheels | DJ Safety | Fuel Safe | Rugged Radios | J. E. Reel | Rugged Routes | Lasernut | Currie Enterprises | Magnaflow | CTM Racing | sPOD | Artec Industries | PRP Seats | Luxwurx | Warn | Sharq Skinz | DGP Motion Media | Factor55 | 212 Performance Gloves | Off Road Development | Pacific Advisors | SoCal Services | Beachview Insurance | Villa Landscape Products | SoCal Land Maintenance | EctoVentures

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Hiking the Redonda Ridge with an SCX10 Trail Honcho

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Hiking the  Redonda Ridge with an SCX10 Trail Honcho

Words & Photos: Rodney “GCRad1″ Wills

Hopefully you’ve read the lead-up stories:
Planning a SCX10 Hike over Redonda Ridge OHV Trail 1W17
PACK CONTENTS FOR A SCX10 TRAIL HIKE
Getting There – SCX10 Hike Over Redonda Ridge – Big Bear, California
 Axial AX90059 SCX10 II™ Trail Honcho 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – RTR

All the planning is sorted, now we are about to do this thing! We wake up early, I think my alarm went off at 6:00am. Didn’t sleep that well, I think I was too excited.
Too much planning made for too much anticipation.
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It’s Wednesday Morning, October 25th, and I get myself physically prepared; Altra Lone Peak 3.0 Trail shoes, Stance Training Crew socks and Hammer Nutrition Endurolytes for cramp prevention as its going to be a warm day.
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I load the beloved SCX10 Trail Honcho into my ADV80 and we get ready to depart camp and make our way down to the the start of the trail just past Crab Flats Campground. We will start here (Google Map Link) at the Redonda Ridge 1W17 trail marker sign. Four of us will be walking the trail and John Schultz and ScottG will be taking the two vehicles back to camp awaiting our return to camp later this afternoon – evening.
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Last minute morning bits; I get my water bladder filled and of course I have my Hammer Nutrition Heed pre-mix going!
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John Schultz hooked me up! I have a magnetized hood so I don’t loose my body clips!
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Rather simple and rather simple silly cool! Schultz learned it from somewhere and we will make a little blog about it at a later date.
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Load in the first battery and mark the time of start.
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OFFICIAL START: 9:05am Wednesday October 25th, 2017
Axial Trail Honcho Hike Over Redonda Ridge OHV Trail 1W17 is now underway!!!Redonda Ridge Planning-7
This first portion of trail is actually down hill. Everyone is in good spirits!
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I can’t help it, I shoot photos of everything… even the trees. And the landscape! I love the textures and the colors. I’ve been known to “#textures” on my IG before. I can hear my buddy Jarod DeAnda laughing now, “your and your #texture hashtag.”
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Big Bear is a mix or a transitional point from the desert to the mountains, depending on your location on the mountain, you can get a mix of cactus and pine trees of which we will see both today along ridge route to Big Pine Flats.
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The SCX10 Trail Honcho doing what its suppose to do, trailing along.
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Still working our way down hill.
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The sun is warming up quickly, but luckily we still have some shade as we make our way down to the creek, but once over we are fully exposed and will be in “up hill mode!”
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Trails crossing… should put us right about here on Google Maps.

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Keep on mini truckin’ hehehe That’s funny! I know all the GMC dude’s rock the #TinyTrucks tag. I’m an og Mini-Truckin’ dude! I’m going to see if I can dig that old hat out!
We might upset some folks… hehehe
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BRAAAP! off the air craft landing strip shrapnel – the OG Sand Ladder aka Marston Mat. Know your overland-spec history yo! Look it up!
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We are almost to the creek crossing, more like stream crossing, but it is coming up soon.Redonda Ridge Planning-28
I’m usually the one hauling the video camera on these missions so it’s a bit strange for me to see my colleagues carrying the gear.
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It’s been at least a month since my previous crossing and the water level is going down quickly.
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Anthony Rivas got roped into hiking this trip with us and he is doing what he does best, directing some social media shots!
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Hey look! It’s not me on the vid-cam, it’s Scott Roberts doing the video camera action! While most people don’t see or know much about this man right here, he has worked here at Axial with me since 2011. Everything you see visually from Axial basically comes from this man or at least across his desk.
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We crossed over it at the creek crossing, the PCT runs along it through here making yet another appearance in my face! It keeps calling me… But not a full blown thru-hike, maybe just the SoCal weekend section hiking…
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The SCX10 Trail Honcho looks down on the PCT like, “I got this!”
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Who is a fan of desert tan, green eggs and ham mixed with DJ Red Alert.
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Since we left the creek crossing it has become very apparent that THE ASCENT IS ON!
The trail surface to this point has been mostly course sand mixed DG based.
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But as we continue on and up, rocks are starting to litter the trail.
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Also too, after the creek crossing, we are out of the tree cover and exposed to the sun.

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The crew said there was suppose to be a picnic table set up at this GPS point location. Something about pre-paid Amazon air drone delivery service…
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I keep on trucking as I want to get the SCX10 Trail Honcho into rockier conditions!
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The crew finally gives up in protest about the picnic table. “We are canceling our PayPal payment!” The sun laughs and turns up the temperature and add some incline for good measure.
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See! Cactus… on the edge of the forest!
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Climbing…
Climbing…
Climbing…

At the one shade spot…
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We see deer tracks.
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Little ones…Redonda Ridge Planning-51
Hey guys, where you at?
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Carrying on our climb dance!
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Climbing… It’s what the SCX10 Trail Honcho eats for breakfast.
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Climbing… It’s what the SCX10 Trail Honcho dream about before breakfast. Redonda Ridge Planning-59
Climbing… It’s what the SCX10 Trail Honcho does at high noon.
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Climbing… It’s what the SCX10 Trail Honcho does just for fun!
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We make the first major climb for what seems like two hours straight…
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but we finally reach a little plato of earth… Redonda Ridge Planning-67 Redonda Ridge Planning-68
POSER SHOTS! Scroll back up three images…. The guys are asking if the trail goes up over those hills.. “The trail looks like it goes over…” I ignore or I think I said, “yea, naa, I think it cuts around to the right out of sight… Time to roll!”
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From our moment of flat perch, we get to see down this little canyon and its cool to see the small batches of trees. Feels like some wilderness to me!  Redonda Ridge Planning-71
“Therezzz GOLD IN DEM DAR HILLS!!! FOOLS GOLD YO!!!” I gotta’keep the spirits high!
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It’s cool to see the terrain change.
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More #texture change.
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I think this is my favorite shot of the trip. I saw the setting as I was walking up to the crest, stopped, snapped one photo and said, “Yep! Leave it chance and see how the “film” comes out!” Came out all right…
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As the SCX10 Trail Honcho takes in the view, I check the spot to see what it looks like from the front. It’s not as cool of a shot but see that trail we are coming up! Yes sir, we are doing this thing!
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I circle back around to verify the animal footprints. Small one here, but I did see some larger “kitty cat” prints earlier, most  likely a healthy bobcat.
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The Axial SCX10 Trail Honcho is its proper surroundings.
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Trail Honcho bossing the moto trail, but the gnar lay ahead.Redonda Ridge Planning-83
I nicknamed this “scary bush.” Especially if we was coming through here at night.
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The tree is still wearing it’s charred skin from the Butler Peak fire of which I think was back in 2007.
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Did I ever tell you that I actually like shooting photos? But just look at that trail! It’s an “ALL BRAAAP!” section! But wait…
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Now we are getting into some gnar! It’s not easy to get a 2D photo to show the dynamic perspective of hills and their steepness, but take note of Scott Roberts walking ahead, you get a little since of the angle here.
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Maybe this will give you a perspective… Rest stop! SR & Rivas taking a breather, because they can see what lays ahead… ANOTHER HILL!Redonda Ridge Planning-91
The Trail Honcho is upholding it’s SCX10 heritage and just eats up each mile regardless of steepness.
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Meanwhile the steepness is eating up my crew. “Look SR, we have to climb that hill, that other hill behind that and then that other one way back there…”
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Kinda’ spectacular out here!
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Interesting how the cross section view of this tree’s rings looks like four trees in one.
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The SCX10 Trail Honcho just churning out the climbs.
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This trail has obviously been here for a while and been well “knobby traveled” but you have to wonder, who did it first? Who cut this trail? Was it an Indian foot path before? One day I need to stop into Malcolm Smith Motorsports and ask Malcolm directly as this trail is called the Malcolm Smith Trail. But there is very little historical information about this trail online.Redonda Ridge Planning-99
Same photo as the one preceding this one, but I wanted to show the ridge of which we traveled. We’re kinda’ out here! Yes, civilization is just over the mountain the in the background, but your still out here… We haven’t seen anyone else all day… and I like that.
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The SCX10 Trail Honcho takes the hard line just for fun I however will walk the easy path.
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More gnar please.

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The SCX10 Trail Honcho FINALLY runs out of gas! It would… just feet from a nice shady flat area.
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Good thing I have my Schizzle-magnets! I’m a fan! Thanks John!
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Battery #2 loaded and battery #1 marked with the elapse time.Redonda Ridge Planning-108
Just a few more feet and my view looks like this and I join the crew in the shade.
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While I’ve been self-fueling all along, we take a static moment to enjoy our nutrition bars.
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Time to roll!
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With another crest of a hill reveals another view!
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And then more climbing!!!
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While spectacular, the views keep showing those climbs… Redonda Ridge Planning-116
Here you get a little sense of the climb as you can see the crew pushing on.
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I like this shot! I think it shows a bit more of the hill but the view is spectacular!
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But the climb has a summit and a summit reveals more.. See that little trail thread? Talk about onion layers! Redonda Ridge Planning-122
We take a moment in the shade.
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I know you guys are on the Altra Trail Running shoe tip, but are you on the Trial Gator tip? I’m diggin my shoe gators! As goofy looking as they are, they’re total function! With the small gravel-DG-dirt, the gators are perfect for keeping all that stuff out of my shoes!
Get some! https://www.altrarunning.com/gear/men

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SCX10 Trail Honcho is back in the trail saddle.
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The sun is starting to throw the long shadows…Redonda Ridge Planning-125
The team is working to push themselves forward as elevation and the rate of steepness has not given in!
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We start to get into another step section, but its been steep all along. I guess it’s more like a steep chute.
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Y
ou sorta’ get a sense of steepness from this view, but regardless I’m just shooting it for the view, the memory, the way the sun is flaring.
Just as I drop the camera back to my side, I’m having to get after this little section. I actually start to wonder if I can actually make this section! I won’t say I am nervous yet as I know I can trail blaze the SCX10 Trail Honcho around if I have to, but it will be limited space to do so. I stay in the trough or chute of a trail and work the rig through the boulder and then in the deep heavy granular sand or DG – decomposed granite. The combination of having to use wheel speed to push up hill in the DG while also the tires dig down and find bite on the rocks below… I hear it… Wait, what? I don’t want to hear that!!!
OH NO! NO FORWARD MOMO.. MO – MOTION!
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After we diagnose the issue, Tony takes my tools and jumps into action so I can
document the wrench action.
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Again, dig the magnet trick as we can drop the screws here on the underside and the body clips are on the top side.
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As suspected, idler gear gone fishing for the afternoon.
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We fish out what debris we can in preparation to install a new gear.  Redonda Ridge Planning-128g
We install a metal idler gear Mr. AX31585 Redonda Ridge Planning-128h
Field repair is almost complete!
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Buttoning it all back together and we will be back in action in moments!

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Now we are back in action and started where we pulled off and it’s the start of
the nasty climbs!
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As you can see, there is a cleaner easier path to take, but what is the fun in that?!
I came here to put the rig through its paces on the rugged trail of the Redonda Ridge.
I could have just stayed home and drove circles around in the parking lot, but that is not my idea of fun! Being out here is fun, while it is both grueling on my body and the SCX10 Trail Honcho. But it’s worth it as it’s an additional layer of testing.Redonda Ridge Planning-131
These climbs also showcase some scenic views!
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Photos never seem to capture the true steepness of a hill, but looking at ScottR and Rivas as they make their way up, shows a bit of how steep this section truly is. When I begin to question if I will be able to drive a section due to the steepness, I really start looking creative driving lines!  Redonda Ridge Planning-134a
When you see motorcycle parts on the ground, you know its a tough section.
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But we are “still not out of the woods” yet, insert “rocks” in place of woods. Yes, we are still in the woods, with rocks strewn about! hehehe   Redonda Ridge Planning-138
Rivas making his way up. The team has come to the conclusion that there is no end in hills, they just keep rolling at us. Only to discover around each bend, more hill!
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And more hill it is!
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The lighting from the sun is just awesome! We are within the “golden hour” and I could sit on this hillside and shoot till dark!
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But, I only snap off a couple and keep moving as I knew we have at least a mile or two further to go and we will be hiking in the dark.
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The sun is is about to drop behind the mountains and the ground bush on our mountain is blocking some of that light, but we finally made it through that section! Redonda Ridge Planning-143  Redonda Ridge Planning-145
You just want a lounge chair and a big dinner as this is the perfect wide-screen!
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But we must keep going, the SCX10 Trail Honcho marches on!Redonda Ridge Planning-147
Another big boulder garden! Who plants these things?!
Who would want these things to grown like this?
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The SCX10 Trail Honcho makes no worries of such matters and see’s only the playground in mother nature’s garden of rocks.  Redonda Ridge Planning-150
WHAT?! A moment of downhill or even flatness is a happy moment!

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Only to be defused by another uphill climb as Tony makes more reveling with his headlamp that we will be engulfed by darkness on the backside of this climb.
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Everyone is beat tired, but the view is magical.
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Battery change time!
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There is both excitement and angst in the air from the crew. The hills are behind us, the darkness is ahead of us.

Maybe the last climb? Redonda Ridge Planning-172
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Hike team headlamps streaking by.Redonda Ridge Planning-174
The SCX10 Trail Honcho awaits the last of the team to pass for the final view of darkness and the final decent to the trail gate at Crab Flats. The end is near, just ahead down a dark mountainside with ZERO moon light. We make our way down and ScottG is awaiting us, with lights on in the rig, we can see how much further we have and the excitement builds for the team!  “GET US OFF THIS TRAIL!” is what a think I heard! Redonda Ridge Planning-181
WE ARE HERE – WE ARE HERE – WE ARE HERE!!!Redonda Ridge Planning-184
We extract the third and final battery out of the SCX10 Trail Honcho and mark the times.

OFFICIAL FINISH: 7:30PM Wednesday October 25th, 2017

Total mileage: 9.68 mile / Total Elapse Time: 10-hrs & 25-mins
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This trip epic, awesome, fun, grueling and was a big learning curve!
The crew will forever remember this trip! Redonda Ridge Planning-185
That’s a wrap! Spark Arresters Required!

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Back at camp, ScottG aka “BKGriller” makes HAMBURGERS for the HUNGRY!!!

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[L2R] Tony Phalen (cam-2), ScottR (cam-1), Rodney Wills (SCX10 Pilot), John Schultz (team basecamp & rig prep), Anthony Rivas of Rivas Concepts (guest & social documentary) ScottG (team basecamp & trail transpo & chief).

See the rig:
Axial AX90059 SCX10 II™ Trail Honcho 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – RTR

Planning a SCX10 Hike over Redonda Ridge OHV Trail 1W17
PACK CONTENTS FOR A SCX10 TRAIL HIKE
Getting There – An SCX10 Hike Over Redonda Ridge
Axial AX90059 SCX10 II™ Trail Honcho 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – RTR
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About the Author: Redonda Ridge Planning-191
Rodney Wills may not have been born with a silver spoon in his mouth, but he was more than compensated for it by being able to grow up behind the wheel. At eight years old he started driving heavy equipment on his uncle’s farm. Flouting child labor laws, his uncle would put him to work; he would get him started and jump off the tractor, and have Rodney cut and plow fields. The uncle found Rodney a willing employee. Now, while he did not engage in any tractor races, the seed had been planted (literally); the passion for driving already raced through his veins.

Later on in Alabama, Rodney would drive his father’s old pickup truck. As young teenagers sometimes do, he would sneak the truck out to splash in the mud on the local country back roads. Rodney did not limit himself to four-wheel rides, however. Motorcycles were always apart of family life and Rodney had started riding at age five. Racing came at age six on the dirt oval flat track at Talladega. Trail riding was an everyday thing in the backyard woods and local mountains.

Magazines would introduce Rodney to skateboarding and then BMX in 1977. Normal by today standards but then in rural Alabama, Rodney was way ahead of his peers. Just like his hobbies, his life went in the order of Art, Music, and Cars. His passions led him to the California College of Arts and Crafts after two years at the Atlanta College of Arts and Crafts. After achieving a bachelors degree of art in graphic design, Rodney went on to work ten years in the snow, skate and surf industry through his art, working for the famous O’Neill wetsuit company. Next came music as the art director for the car audio speaker manufacturer Image Dynamics. That led to Rodney starting the import car culture lifestyle magazine, TMRm’zine [1996-2000]. This magazine put the “lifestyle” label on the import market that has now grown to enormous proportions in the automotive industry. For the next 10-years Rodney worked in magazine publishing. During a meeting between colleagues, Wills was helping an event promoter make his event better, which lead to a more in-depth connection to the R/C industry pulling Rodney in to work for HPI Racing [2006-2010]. Since 2010, Rodney has worked for Axial as Global Marketing Director coming up with wacky ideas such as this.

Video documentary of the Axial SCX10 Rubicon Trek

SCX10_II_Rubicon_trekADV
Words/Photos: Rodney Wills

Back in 2013, we published a series of blog posts that I wrote documenting our efforts to take a bone-stock 1/10th scale Axial AX90028 SCX10™ 2012 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – RTR out of the box and drive it over the world renowned full-size Rubicon Trail.

Our Rubicon Trek took place in October of 2012, and those blog posts reflect each day’s events from start to finish. What those blog posts did not show is the video footage documenting this trip – until now! We have two video’s; one at 9-minutes long talking about the trip over video footage and the second one at 55-minutes that shows a lot more footage for your milk & cookies viewing pleasure.

The photos from that trip was purely secondary to the docu-trip as they were shot with a little Canon PowerShot SD1100 IS pocket camera carried in my pocket. The video camera and heavy duty tripod was the “heavy equipment” weighing in at 19-lbs. I did not shoot every square inch of the 15+ mile trail, so there was a lot of shoulder time with the camera as getting in-and-out of the Jeep was not practical as we had all the camp gear and equipment spread out in the Jeep once we were on trail. Regardless of the rigors I personally went through, I am very stoked to have the opportunity to plan, execute and document this trip. These videos reflect the Axial SCX10’s pure performance capabilities.

Need a jump-link to those previous blog post?
http://www.axialracing.com/blog_posts?cat=814