RECON G6 Challenge Birthday Bash 2014

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2014 RECON G6 Challenge Birthday Bash
December 6, 2014
Moonrocks, Reno, Nevada
Words and Photos by Matt “Skeeno” Soileau

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Can you believe that the RECON G6 Challenge is four years old?  I can’t. It seems like just yesterday a few of us guinea pigs showed up at the first RECON G6 Challenge and tested our Axial SCX10s on the longest, most technically challenging trail they had ever been on.

This year the RECON G6 Challenge not only traveled to seven of the United States, it went global with a stop in Austria! Attendance records were also set at each event as more and more members joined the RECON G6 family. So, in honor of the birth of the RECON G6 Challenge, the annual Birthday Bash G6 was once again held in the birth city of this great event.

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This past weekend, Skeeno Jr. and I headed out to Moonrocks just north of Reno, Nevada to celebrate all the great things that have come to the RECON G6 Challenge this year. It just so happened to take place on the same weekend that a few local clubs were holding their Club Challenges, so the location was full.

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When I arrived, the line was already out the door. Eager G6ers were waiting in line to be registered and to also donate their toys for the Washoe County Sherriff’s Christmas on the Corridor program.

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Mr. Rivas Concepts and Mr. Cole were at the front of the line getting drivers registered and collecting the toys.

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Over 100 new toys were donated.

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Hoyfab had his YETI XL on display at the registration booth. This thing was sweet and full of extra detail. Equipped with a Premier Power Welder and tons of GoPro cameras. Hoyfab is the man to see for awesome 3D printed scale accessories.

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Also on the table was this wonderful jerky. I may have eaten multiple pieces while Cole and Rivas weren’t looking.  Thanks for the hookup OFO Crawlers. Feel free to bring more to Axialfest 2015.

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I spotted a couple sweet trailers waiting in line. The trailer is the new black. You better get yours ready for Axialfest 2015. And don’t forget, Axialfest will be held in July this year. More info can be found here: https://www.facebook.com/events/1506299382978745/

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Of course RPP Hobby was in attendance, they are the Official Hobby Shop of the RECON G6 Challenge.

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This Drivin Diva didn’t have time to drive, but Alyssa made sure to come out to say hi to all her old driving buddies. Thanks for stopping by.  We hope to see you on the trail soon.

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While waiting for everyone to register, I headed over to the 1:1s to check out the rigs and see what was going on.  This first crawler I came to just happened to belong to my old buddy, Bryan.  Can you believe this started life as a Suzuki Samurai?  The only thing Samurai left on this rig is the firewall now.

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I also spotted the Axial Wraith in the queue waiting for its turn on course. Notice it’s also running the Official Tires of the RECON G6, Pitbulls.

DSCF0388The pile of kits kept growing and growing.

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This lone Land Rover was looking for a home. Who wants this?

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Rudolph, the Red Nosed Reindeer would be proud to be seen in these two kits.

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Parker went over the rules. Remember, no Hand of God.  That’s pretty much the golden rule.

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As always, the National Anthem was played before the lipos were lit.

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Parker was kind enough to line us up backwards. We got to drive in reverse to that rock behind him before we could drive forward.

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Somehow, Skeeno Jr. and I ended up in the lead for the first dozen or so trail markers.

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Of course, Mr. Pham eventually passed us by. His Axial SXC10 RECON G6 Jeep is the envy of many G6ers. That’s the perks of working at a hobby shop.

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Skeeno Jr. tried to keep up the pace…

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…but Mr. Fokai finally got by her. Besides, the RECON G6 isn’t about winning. It’s about having fun, so we let him by and relaxed.

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Reno’s CKRC crew brought a full compliment of drivers and kits.  They were super helpful, and I saw them personally give away parts to at least three broken drivers, so they could finish.

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It’s a good thing I had my new Bull Rope tow strap. It came in handy. Since we had some recent rains, the rocks got a little muddy and slippery. Here, I had to pull Skeeno Jr. out of a crevice she slipped in to.

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Those balloons helped this Wraith float over the rocks.

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TM102 presented the opportunity for a little air time, so I took it.

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The courses at the RECON G6 Challenge are always long, so it’s a good idea to pack refreshments. Remember, it’s about having fun, so there’s no need to run.

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I have to include this picture because Parker loves Scouts, and this one’s leading the way.

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There’s always casualties at a RECON G6. Remember, finishing a RECON G6 is like winning a RECON G6. Don’t be afraid to make trail repairs and ask for help if you need it. Other G6ers are always happy to lend a fellow G6er a hand.

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Speaking of lending a hand, Werty lent Skeeno Jr. some of his sweet jack stands to help her with some maintenance in the pits.

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I think Mini Meeks was giving me the stink eye.

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Scale or 1:1?

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This Jeep was having a hard time climbing this section.  It took me a while, but I finally figured out why…there was no driver, duh.

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One of my favorite G6ers made it out. Mr. Stern is also our oldest G6er at 91 years young.

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The last time I saw this trailer, it was camo-ed out. This teardrop trailer was even cooler this time in full RECON G6 regalia. You can see the old version here: http://www.axialracing.com/blog_posts/1073908833

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I told you trailers were popular. Here the Werty trailer adds a little extra challenge to this sandy hill climb.

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Parker and RC Chick putted around on my CT70 making sure everyone was having a good time. He also used it to plant some special prizes on course.

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Here’s what he was planting, $20 RPP gift certificate coins. Did you find one?

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Remember that if you find something that looks out of place at a G6, it’s probably a trail treasure. Pick it up and take it back to G Central with you and you will be rewarded. Mr. Tree found this double barreled sling shot over on Course 2 and earned some bonus time for his good fashion sense.

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The best part of Moonrocks is the rocks.  The jagged granite provides tons of traction and the sandy decomposed granite removes that traction, so it’s always a dance with the trigger finger.

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I cut my RC crawling teeth at the Moonrocks, so it was fun to reminisce about all the old B.P.R.C.A comps that were held in these exact same lines.

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Uh oh, that Scout is falling behind. He’s probably just letting this Jeep feel what it’s like to be in front for once.

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After Skeeno Jr. and I were finished driving, we headed over to check out the 1:1s. This Jeep was at the top of a steep off camber climb.

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Here’s the other side of the climb. This leaf springer almost flipped on its lid.

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The Axial Wraith used a little wheel speed to get up this line.

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Just like RC crawling comps, there’s lots of waiting in line with the 1:1s as well.  That’s why we love the RECON G6, no lines and Maximum Drive Time!

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This 1:1 detonated his Rockwell in this crevasse. Skeeno Jr. thought it was awesome. She was fascinated by these big boys.

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My buddy Bryan made the crevasse line with no problem even with a hastily stitched back together driveshaft.  It’s all about finesse sometimes.

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As we headed back to G Central, we spotted a few of the last G6ers finishing up their courses.

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Some scale water, axle deep.

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The CKRC/Rivas Concepts Deadbolt was still looking good even after running all day long.

Of course, we finished up the day with a few awards.

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Durty Driver of the Day, Mini Meeks

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Drivn Diva of the Day, Mrs. Werty

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Expedition Driver of the Day, Mr. J.J.

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2.2 Driver of the Day, Mr. Kowatch

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1.9 Driver of the Day, Mr. Klein

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Drivers of the Year, Klein and Wolfe

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6×6 Driver of the Year, Mr. Hoyfab.

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Luckiest Winners of the Day taking home G6 kits, so they’ll be ready for the next RECON G6 Challenge.

The calendar of events for 2015 will be out soon. Watch www.recong6.com for events coming to your area soon. You don’t want to miss one.

RECON G6 – Birthday Bash 3

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RECON G6 Presents
Birthday Bash 3
Wingfield Park, Reno, Nevada
December 7, 2013

It’s still hard to believe the RECON G6 is three years old. It seems both older and newer at the same time. On one hand, it seems like just yesterday that I drove in the first RECON G6 at Mayberry Park, and yet it also feels like I have been doing this all my life. I think the camaraderie and family like atmosphere just makes the RECON G6 feel like home.

In celebration of the success of the RECON G6, the Birthday Bash has always been a thank you from RECON G6 to all the drivers that make the RECON G6 what it is. This past year the RECON G6 went nationwide and international with events in Florida, Missouri, Colorado, Arkansas, Oregon, California, Nevada, and Ontario, Canada.

The RECON G6 Birthday Bash has also partnered with a couple local charities, so drivers were encouraged to bring toys for children as well as nonperishable food items for the local Sheriff’s Christmas on the Corridor toy drive and Evelyn Mount Community Outreach food pantry.

In the past, Mother Nature has been kind to the RECON G6ers with mild winter weather. This year Mother Nature had a special treat for the G6ers, snow and freezing temperatures. I was a bit worried. I wasn’t worried about fun because this would not be the first snow covered G6. There was a RECON G6 a couple years ago that the RECON G6 crew shoveled miles of snow paths for. So, I knew that the RECON G6 crew would have a path cleared for the drivers. What I was worried about was attendance.  I was afraid the snow roads and frigid temperatures would render the turnout low. I’m not sure why I was worried. G6ers are a special breed. There were already many cars in the parking lot. I spotted some out-of-towners who braved the roads to attend.

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This guy made the trip down from Oregon. He was the first one I spotted as I parked.

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There’s a California. Looks like he saw quite a bit of snow on the pass over.

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Idaho, too. This family came overland ready.

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I also spotted Old Red Rocket in the parking lot. I wonder what time she got there?

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The Truckee River looked a little frigid. I wouldn’t want to fall in there today.

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When I turned the corner, I was a little surprised to see how many G6ers were already registered and lined up. They had their kits decorated in the Birthday Bash spirit.

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Presents, check. Christmas Tree, check.

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Someone went crazy with the pipe cleaners and foamy stickers.

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I little ribbon can really dress up your JK in a hurry. All it takes is a little imagination.

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I spotted my first RECON G6 Jeep Wrangler in the wild. This one was fitted with snow chains. These G6ers were ready for the snow.

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This sweet Pajero has a G6 certified sticker on the bumper, but I think it is a mall crawler. I never saw it get dirty.

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Why is this guy smiling like this?

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Because the RECON G6 crew set up a warming tent with a huge mushroom heater in the middle. This was a popular spot to come warm up and trade driving stories.

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Adventure IQ brought up his family. They shared their cookies, heater, and best of all….

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…the most delicious, soul warming spiced apple cider I have ever tasted. It was AWESOME.

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Look who made the 5,000 mile trek from Austria for the FOURTH TIME, Daniel Siegl. What’s your excuse for not attending a RECON G6 event?

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Jesse registers while trying to work around all the toys and food all the G6ers donated.

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I see canned food and a snow saucer, the perfect present for the day.

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A whole family of Happy Birthday Heads.

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Not a thief, just trying to keep the face from freezing.

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The coolest RECON G6 Jeep Wrangler I saw from KlingOn RC. This thing was sweet looking.

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Even his interior was dialed.

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New for 2014 is the Expedition Class. Trailers and 6x6es finally get their own class. This guys was a little eager to get it started.

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That’s more kits than I expected to see on a 7* winter day.

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The trail looked ready. Drivers were just waiting for the Parker to arrive.

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There he is. Listen up drivers. This is a special RECON G6, there are…..

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I hope they listened to instructions. I headed out to set up for photos.

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Mandatory National Anthem.

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Now we’re off. I wonder how those chains will work.

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Pretty good, so far.

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The walking warms the body.

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The first section was down some snow covered boulders.

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Good to see the Ridgeline getting some wheel time.

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Snow makes for some slow driving, so lines were pretty common on the first lap.

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Those leaves will either create traction or remove traction, only time will tell.

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I loved this Bronco.

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I hope those presents don’t fall off the back. He should put those in the cab.

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Looks like those leaves remove traction.

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The Great Pham coming through in the second wave.

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Watch out for trolls under the bridge.

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I spot the Daniel Siegl out there.

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These ducks heard a commotion and went to investigate.

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It was the G-Train coming through.

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Down the Urban Highway.

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Over to the movie theater. A patron asked what was happening. They wondered why all these people were out walking their radio controlled cars.  I gladly explained the RECON G6 to them.

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These steps were easier to go down than up.

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This poor sport was pouting because his parents didn’t buy him the RECON G6 Jeep Wrangler for Christmas.

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Approaching Flop Corner.

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Why is it called Flop Corner?

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Oh, that’s why.

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Good thing G6ers are helpful and quick to lend a strap.

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Another RECON G6 Jeep Wrangler making things look easy.

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It had to strap this poor Cherokee through TM20.

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Snow required large doses of skinny pedal at times.

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KlingOn RC RECON G6 Jeep Wrangler flexing its muscles.

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Nice hat, Tim.

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Wraiths had to be a little more cautious on this ledge.

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You needed a little speed to make it up this rock face. This Wraith had plenty.

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This mud truck turned into a snow truck.

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Well, that’s one way to get the snow of your kit.

New Awards: Drivin Durty, drivers that don’t have licenses. AKA under 15 class

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Drivin Divas, The Lady Class.

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OG Drivers of the Day.

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Of the Year Awards.  Drivers who Shined All Year Long by exhibiting the Spirit of the RECON G6.

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The BIG Winner.

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The other winners.

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Thanks again Axial and the RECON G6 crew for a great year. I know that 2014 will be even more spectacular. Check www.recong6.com for the full list of events in 2014.

Axial RECON Ultra4 G6 2014 at King of the Hammers

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Axial RECON Ultra4 G6 at King of the Hammers

Axial Racing & RECON Crawlers has brought r/c enthusiasts Big Events since 2007. The Axial West Coast Championships started the r/c crawling “Big Events” and was the first to ever have qualifying rounds and LCQ’s. Axial Racing and RECON Crawlers teamed up again to bring r/c enthusiasts and their families an r/c genre that has swept the World, known as the RECON G6. The RECON G6 is more than an event, it’s a Life Style. The King of the Hammers (KOH) and Ultra4 racing is also a life style and they are going to be getting their R/C scaler fix, in The Axial RECON G6. This is the last event on the 2014 KOH schedule starting at noon on Saturday, if you own an Axial R/C, come out and get your fix in this 2nd annual Axial RECON Ultra4 G6.

Axial RECON Ultra4 G6 Intel

2014 Axial RECON G6 Adventure Series Event #1

When – February 8, 2014
Where – King of the Hammers (exact location TBA soon)
Why – Because we’re G6′n and everyone knows it.
Drivers Meeting / Stage line up to start at high noon or 12pm.
Stage Start following the National Anthem. (12:30+/-)
G-Fee – $25.00
15 and Under – $15.00

Bringing a power bar or Monster Ultra Zeros to G-Central is not mandatory, but highly recommended.

-A tow strap is mandatory. This can be a lanyard or shoe lace.
-5 scale items are mandatory. This may include side mirrors, seats, sleeping bags, etc.
-5 medieval scale items are not mandatory, but highly recommended. This could be a sword, shield, hat etc.
-Running the number and name of your favorite Ultra4 racer is not mandatory, but highly recommended.
-A spare tire is not mandatory, but highly recommended.
-A winch is not mandatory, but highly recommended.

If you missed the first ever Axial RECON Ultra 4 G6, don’t miss this one. There will be more of everything, including all the new 2014 RECON G6 classes and awards.

Classes –

- 1.9 Adventurist Class – This class is for all scalers using 1.9 size wheels & tires. It doesn’t matter your driving ability or your truck’s capability, everyone and every truck is capable of finding adventure here.

- 2.2 Adventurist – This class is for all scalers using 2.2 size wheels & tires. If you like big tires, this is your class. The 2.2 Adventurist will face bigger challenges, and their driving ability and scaler capability will be tested, as well. The 2.2 Adventurist has become a premiere class in the RECON G6.

- Expedition Class – “NEW” for 2014 and available at the Birthday Bash G6, – This class is for 6×6’s and scalers with trailers. This class will have more mandatory scale items and is geared towards the builders who enjoy the challenges of driving a 6×6 Truck or towing a trailer. Wheel and tire size are restricted to 1.9’s. Tires must be scale licensed or scale knock-offs. Expedition 6×6’s and G-Rides with trailers will each be awarded.

- RECON Ready Wrangler Modified Class – “NEW” for 2014 and available at the Birthday Bash G6, – This class is for the new Axial Jeep Wrangler G6 kit. Drivers are allowed to run any motor / esc combination, servo of your choice, any 1.9 tire / wheel combination, & battery of your choice. Rear steer and dig are not mandatory, but highly recommended. A winch and Pull Pal are not mandatory, but highly recommended. No AR60 or Wroncho style axles. The Stock body, frame rails, transmission case, and cage must be used. Stock or upgraded parts for the Axial SCX10 may be used, including transmission cases, axle housings, drivelines, steering knuckles, C’s, etcetera. Drivers finding adventure in the RECON Ready Wrangler Modified Class are eligible for a new kit & swag package.

- RECON G6 Driving Diva of the Day Award – “New” for 2014 & available at the Birthday Bash G6,- The best 1.9 Adventurist and 2.2 Adventurist female driver will be receive an award for their efforts.

- RECON G6 Driving Durty Award – “New” for 2014 & available at the Birthday Bash G6. This award will be awarded for the top 1.9 Adventurist & 2.2 Adventurist 15 years or younger.

- Event Credentials and Finishing Tags – “New” for 2014 and available starting February of 2014, – All drivers that pre-register for a RECON G6, will receive event specific credentials to commemorate the RECON G6 they attend and all G6’ers will receive finishing tags upon completing the RECON G6 stage, because “finishing a RECON G6 is like winning a RECON G6.

Bring the Family. Bring your friends. Bring your sense of adventure. The 2014 Axial RECON Ultra4 G6 will have you on the edge of your scale adventure seat. Join us for all the King of the Hammers racing action, including racing action on Axial Blvd. Not only will there be an Axial Adventure trail, but new for 2014, Ultra 4 racing action. Do you like bragging rights? Do you like swag? Do you like being the fastest driver of the day? Night? Week? Then come experience Ultra 4 racing Axial 1/10 scale RECON style.

Come get your scale adventure fix, at the 2014 Axial RECON Ultra4 G6!

To Pre-register for this event, click here!

Please visit RECON on their web pages and FaceBook here….

RECONG6.com

RECON G6 Facebook

Axial’s AS-3 Servo Upgrade

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Axial’s AS-3 servo is standard equipment in all RTR Axial vehicles. We know most people hear the term “RTR servo” and they immediately think an “upgrade” is in order. But, this servo is actually very capable for an RTR servo, especially when used in conjunction with 1.9 wheels and tires. The AS-3 servo is a digital servo, it has metal gears and is rated at 150 ounces of torque at 6.0 volts. The one drawback that this servo does have is the main output shaft is supported by a plastic bushing rather than a bearing. After you have run a few battery packs through your RTR you may notice a little slop in the servo’s output shaft where the servo horn attaches. Once dirt gets in around the output shaft and bushing, it starts to wear the bushing fairly quickly. As the bushing wears the servo output shaft will develop some side to side play. Once it wears to a certain point your gear mesh will be compromised and you run the risk of stripping teeth off a servo gear. Luckily for us Fast Eddy Bearings has recognized that a simple inexpensive bearing can add a lot of life to that RTR servo, and eliminate these problems. This is the best “bang for your buck” mod you can make to any Axial RTR vehicle. It is a simple, inexpensive way to upgrade your Axial AS-3 RTR servo.

Remove the servo horn from the servo’s output shaft. Then, remove the servo from the front axle. You will want to unplug the servo from the receiver, just to make the switch less of a hassle. A shot of the servo, and the new 6x10x2.5mm bearing that will replace the bushing.
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Using a 1.5mm driver, loosen up the 4 small screws on the bottom of the servo case.
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You can leave the screws in the case, just make sure they are all loose.
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Set the servo upright so it is sitting on the heads of the 4 screws. Push down on the case and the screws will pop the top cap off. Notice the white bushing on the servo’s output shaft. That is what we will be replacing. If you don’t see it around the output, check the cap of the servo case.
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Bushing removed.
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A side by side shot of the bearing and bushing.
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Install the new bearing in the top cap.
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Reinstall the servo’s top cap and you are done!
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Performing this simple mod will add a lot of life to your AS-3 servo. As mentioned earlier, this is one of the best mods you can make to your RTR Axial vehicle for durability reasons. If you have an old AS-3 servo laying around because it has some slop and you wanted to upgrade. Try installing one of these bearings, and you will have a decent metal gear servo for your spare parts bin.

Link to 6x10x2.5 bearing.
http://www.fasteddybearings.com/6x10x2-5-metal-shielded-bearing-mr106zz-w2-5/

Still not sure you have the confidence to perform this modification? Check out Team Fast Eddy’s video tutorial for a visual step by step “how to”!

Full Option RTR SCX10 Jeep

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Axial offers several optional upgrade parts for the Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon RTR and Kit. Here’s a quick run down of what is installed and why you may want to use these items.

A couple photos of the completed full option build. Axial offers complete body kits for the Jeep, part number AX04035, that includes the clear Lexan body and all the scale accessories. We also offer just the replacement clear Jeep bodies as well, part number AX04033.

First option we will cover is Axial’s simple LED kit, part number AX24257. The simple LED kit comes with 4 white and 2 red LED lights to keep you running long after the sun goes down. I used two small light buckets from Axial’s Light Bucket Set, part number AX80045, and attached them to the front bumper mount with long M3 screws. I used Axial’s LED lens set, part number AX80049, to cover the LEDs front and rear for a more realistic look. The lens kit includes both clear and yellow lens covers to give users a couple options. Need even more light? Add our NVS system, part number AX24251, for the ultimate scale light system.

A couple shots of the rear LEDs with the clear lens covers in place.

Next option added was our new fully licensed Icon shocks, part number AX30103. These come standard in the Jeep kit, but are an option part for the RTR. These shocks feature a new and improved CNC machined shock piston for smoother action through the range of travel. The new Icon shocks also feature clear coated polished aluminum bodies, complete with aluminum faux reservoirs. The main body of the shock is threaded for quick ride height adjustments and pre-load tuning ability. Like their full size counterparts these shocks are completely rebuildable, tunable and offer consistent handling all while adding some of that Icon bling to your SCX10™ chassis.

Axial’s aluminum link kit, part number AX30550, for the SCX10™ was the next upgrade we added. Upgrade your stock plastic links to high quality aluminum. Aluminum links have less flex than the stock plastic links which helps your vehicle track straighter in all conditions. This link kit includes aluminum suspension and steering links, as well as all hardware and rod ends required to complete the conversion.

A shot of the steering links. If you just want to upgrade your steering links only Axial offers a steering upgrade kit, part number AX30426, as well. Upgrading your steering links to aluminum with improve steering response in all conditions, especially in hard binds associated with rock crawling. Another option part that can be seen here is Axial’s HD 25t aluminum servo horn, part number AX30836. Axial’s HD aluminum servo horn provides more responsive steering with less chance of stripping the internal splines over the stock plastic servo horn. Clamping style head for secure mounting in high stress applications. Available in 23, 24 and 25 tooth spline counts.

In this photo you can see a handful of upgrades to improve steering performance and increase the strength of the front axle. Aluminum knuckles, part number AX30496, aluminum knuckles help your vehicle track more consistently in all situations. Combine our knuckles with our aluminum C-hubs, part number AX30495, for the ultimate steering precision. Another option part installed here is Axial’s CVD’s, part number AX30464, for the SCX10™ axles. The CVD’s provide more steering throw that the stock dog bone set-up which is great for tight, technical trail runs. CVD’s also have less slop than the stock set-up for increased efficiency.

Moving on to the rear axle we installed our aluminum axle lockouts, part number AX30494. Axial’s aluminum axle lockouts are more rigid than the stock plastic lockouts, which will allow the vehicle to track better in all situations.

Axial’s HD motor plate was our next upgrade, part number AX30860. Our heavy duty motor plate is for any vehicle running our AX10 transmission. CNC machined from 4.5mm thick billet aluminum, with integrated heatsink fins to help motors run cooler on those all day expeditions. A must have for any R/C overland adventurist! Axial also offers 13T, 14T and 15T steel pinion gears and an 80T spur gear to give end users an array of gear ratios to choose from. Add more torque for low speed crawling to your SCX10™ by installing Axial’s 55T motor. Or if more speed is your thing, add Axial’s 20T motor for higher top speeds. Another option part that we installed here is Axial’s dig system for the Wraith transmission, part number AX30793. This conversion also requires use of our Wraith Dig Transmission Case, part number AX80051. Axial’s dig system allows you to lock the rear wheels, while powering the front wheels only for a tighter turning radius. Shift servo sold separately.

Next option part installed is Axial’s black 1.9 beadlock wheels. Beadlock wheels allow users to tune foam set-ups and change tires at will for varying terrain and conditions. We also added our 1.9 internal weight rings, part number AX30547, for some added weight up front which will help us on steep vertical climbs. You can adjust how much weight is in the front wheels by using our 1.9 wheel weight inserts, part number AX30548.

For tires we went with our 1.9 Maxxis Trepador, part number AX12019. These tires are fully licensed by Maxxis and are molded in Axial’s sticky R35 compound for the ultimate traction in any conditions.

Complete SCX10™ option parts list:
AX8087 – 1.9 Black Eight Hole Beadlock Wheels (x3 to have spare tire)
AX8088 – 1.9 Chrome Eight Hole Beadlock Wheel (x3 to have spare tire)
AX08138 – 1.9 Black Walker Evans Wheels (x3 to have spare tire)
AX12019 – 1.9 Maxxis Trepador Tires R35 Compound (x3 to have spare tire)
AX12016 – 1.9 Ripsaw Tire R35 Compound (x3 to have spare tire)
AX30547 – 1.9 Internal Weight Rings (x2)
AX30548 – 1.9 Wheel Weight Inserts (x3)
AX30549 – SCX10™ Aluminum Link Set (11.4″ wheelbase – Dingo)
AX30550 – SCX10™ Aluminum Link Set (12.3″ wheelbase – Honcho and Jeep)
AX30426 – SCX10™ Aluminum Steering Kit
AX30464 – SCX10™ Universal Axle Set
AX30395 – HD Ring and Pinion Gear Sets (stock gear ratio) (x2)
AX30401 – Overdrive HD Ring and Pinion Gear Sets (x2)
AX30402 – Underdrive HD Ring and Pinion Gear Sets (x2)
AX30786 – Aluminum WB8 Driveshaft Retainer Rings (x2)
AX30571 – 13t Steel Pinion Gear
AX30569 – 14t Steel Pinion Gear
AX30573 – 15t Steel Pinion Gear
AX30665 – 80t Spur Gear
AX30860 – HD Motor Plate
AX30834 – 23t HD Servo Horn
AX30835 – 24t HD Servo Horn
AX30836 – 25t HD Servo Horn
AX30494 – Aluminum Axle Lockouts
AX30495 – Aluminum Axle C-hub’s
AX30496 – Aluminum Knuckles
AX30103 – Icon Aluminum Shocks (x2)
AX30132 – Machined Shock Piston 7mm – 1.5×3 (4pcs)
AX24260 – AE-3 Vanguard ESC
AX24010 – Vanguard 2900KV Brushless Motor
AX24007 – 55 Turn Motor
AX24003 – 20 Turn Motor
AX24256 – 5 LED Light String
AX24257 – Simple LED Kit
AX24251 – NVS Light System
AX80045 – Light Bucket Set (x2)
AX80049 – LED Lens Set – Yellow / Clear (4pcs)
AX30793 – Dig Component Set
AX80051 – Dig Transmission Case
AX04033 – Clear Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon Body (Body only)
AX04035 – Complete Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon Body Kit
AX30200 – Red Springs 3.6 lbs/in (short) (x2)
AX30201 – White Springs 4.32 lbs/in (short) (x2)
AX30202 – Green Springs 5.44 lbs/in (short) (x2)
AX30203 – Yellow Springs 6.53 lbs/in (short) (x2)
AX30204 – Blue Springs 7.95 lbs/in (short) (x2)
AX30205 – Red Springs 2.7 lbs/in (long) (x2)
AX30206 – White Springs 3.6 lbs/in (long) (x2)
AX30207 – Green Springs 4.08 lbs/in (long) (x2)
AX30208 – Yellow Springs 5.44 lbs/in (long) (x2)
AX30209 – Blue Springs 6.81 lbs/in (long) (x2)

A Years Worth of Abuse in One Week?

Those of you that attended the 2012 King of the Hammers race may have seen the Axial demo booth that was set-up near the pit area. Axial ran a demo during the week of KOH with some of our new 2012 SCX10 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon RTR’s. This demo allowed anyone attending the King of the Hammers event to try their hand at driving one of our scale Jeeps on the obstacle course that was built on site. The demo ran twice a day for 2 hours at a time for 5 days, so there is 20 hours of drive time right off the bat. There was also a few extra credit runs at night with these trucks, so we will add another 10 hours of run time there to be on the safe side. We are now at about 30 hours of solid run time for the week, for each of these demos. We recently went to take a look at the condition of the the demo Jeeps in order to prep them for another Axial demo for the 2013 Easter Jeep Safari in Moab, Utah. We grab the first demo JK, pulled it out of the box and was amazed to see how much wear and tear these rigs went through during their week at KOH. The demo rigs look like they had been used for a year, not a week. Everything was intact and working on all the demo SCX10′s too. I thought we put a lot of abuse on the SCX10-JK in the 3 days we spent on the Rubicon. But, the demo drivers at KOH have us beat by a mile as far as the abuse they inflicted upon these demo SCX10′s. Impressive!!

A few photos of the wear and tear. Starting with the front bumper and d-rings.

The front axle.

Chassis skid plate and lower links.

Front driveshaft.

Front wheels. It’s hard to see but almost all the chrome is missing from the outer lip of the wheel.

Moving on to the body, the mirrors took on a bunch of rock rash, but are still intact.

Same goes for the Poison Spyder licensed Crusher Flares, lots of rock rash but they protected the body just like the real product is designed to do.

Rear Crusher Flares.

Again some impressive rock rash for only a few days of running. Way to do work KOH demo drivers!!

Battery Relocation – SCX10 Jeep RTR

We have been getting a few requests recently for a “step by step” tutorial on relocating the battery from its stock location in the rear on the SCX10-JK, to the front. This is a simple modification that can really transform how your rig performs in the rocks. Moving weight from the back to the front of a vehicle greatly enhances its ability to climb steep rock faces. This is a no brainer for me, as I am all about performance with my rigs regardless if they are scale or comp rigs. So let’s dig in!

I am using a “kit” SCX10-JK for this article, but the steps are exactly the same for the kit and RTR Jeeps. A couple shots of the battery tray in stock RTR form.

First thing we need to do is remove the two screws holding the metal battery tray to the chassis.

With the metal tray removed you can access the screws that hold the plastic base of the battery tray.

Remove the two screws that hold the base of the battery tray to the chassis cross-member, located between the rear shock towers.

Next remove the two screws that tie the radio box to the front chassis cross-member.

Locate the bag of plastic extras that is included with the RTR Jeep. Inside there are a few parts required to complete this modification.

Find two of the three battery tray posts in your bag of extras. These will be the main supports for the tray in its new location.

Now grab the parts tree numbered AX80009 from your bag of extras. Cut item #5 off the parts tree. We will use this spacer for the front of the battery tray.

The hardware required for the relocation.

The two main support screws should measure just over an inch.

The front screw needs to be shorter and should measure in the 5/8″ range.

Insert the two long screws in the holes closest to center of the plastic battery tray base, then slide the plastic battery tray posts over the screws.

While holding the spacers on the screws, set the battery base into place so the two long screws line up with the radio box holes. Tighten the screws down until they are snug.

Now grab your short front spacer and set it into place over the front frame cross-member’s molded boss.

Set the metal battery tray into place on the plastic base and install the shorter 5/8″ long screw through the front of the whole assembly.

Install the short flathead screw that holds the metal tray to the plastic base at the rear.

And you are done! A shot of the newly relocated battery tray.

Following these simple steps to move the battery will greatly improve on your SCX10′s already amazing capabilities. Time to go hit the trails!!

Axial – ICON Vehicle Dynamics 61-90mm Aluminum Shocks – Step by Step Build

AX30103 – Icon 61-90mm Aluminum Shock Set – 7mm piston (2pcs)

Now that we have released Axial’s newest scale shocks, which are officially licensed by Icon Vehicle Dynamics, I wanted to take some time to do a step by step build here on the blog to help people get the most out of their new shocks. These shocks are an improvement over our old SCX10 shocks, because of the new fully machined shock piston. The new piston provides a tighter fit inside the shock body which helps eliminate binds as the shock cycles through its travel. The new Icon shock bodies and reservoirs are clear anodized for durability and classic looks, which is a nice touch. Time to dig in and get our hands dirty!

A shot of the packaging. Each package contains all parts and hardware required to build two complete shocks.

I cut all the plastic parts I will need to get started off their respective parts trees.

Open the hardware bags and dump the contents out in a secure location so you don’t loose any vital parts.

Start by locating your aluminum shock bodies and the red o-rings. Apply a little grease to each o-ring before installing them into the shock bodies.

Once you have the o-ring lubed up drop it into place in the bottom of the shock body.

Now locate the plastic spacer that goes in between the o-rings, and install that on top of the first o-ring.

Grease the 2nd o-ring and install it into place on top of the plastic spacer in the shock body.

Next install the lower plastic cartridge and threaded preload adjuster onto the shock body.

Locate your shock shafts and e-clips next.

Install the first e-clip in the bottom slot on the shock shaft.

Slide the shock piston onto the shock shaft next.

Then, install the second e-clip to hold the piston in place.

Both shafts prepped and ready for the next step.

Now we can slide the shock shafts into the shock body from the top. Install the rubber bump stops and thread the rod ends into place as needed.

Apply the Icon decals to the shock reservoirs.

Using the supplied hardware, secure the shock reservoirs to the shock caps.

Insert the black o-rings into the shock cap, and make sure they are properly seated.

Now we will fill the shock body about 3/4 of the way with shock oil and cycle the shock piston to dissipate any and all air bubbles. Make sure the piston stays submersed in the oil while you cycle the shock to get rid of the air bubbles. Once the bubbles are gone fill the shock body until the oil is about 1/16th of an inch from the top of the shock body, so just shy of being full. Once the shock shaft is fully compressed, you should see the oil crown just above the top of the shock body. Screw the cap down tight while holding the shock shaft fully compressed. Once the cap is tight, wipe any excess oil away. Cycle the shock shaft a few times and listen for air bubbles. If you can hear air bubbles gurgling around inside the shock, start over and use a little more oil. Make sure all air bubbles are gone before re-assembling. If the shock shaft won’t compress all the way after this step, you have a little too much oil in the shock body. Remove the shock cap, and re-bleed the shock with a little less oil.

After you are finished bleeding the shock we can install the dual rate springs and spacers as needed.

Slide the springs over the shock body with the plastic spring retainer between the two springs.

Install the lower spring retainer next, and you are done!

That wraps up building Axial’s new fully licensed Icon shocks. Following these tips will help people get the most out of their new SCX10 shocks.

Custom Rock Sliders

Here’s a few tips on making your own custom length rock sliders out of stock plastic Axial rock sliders that are included with all SCX10 vehicles. The stock sliders look great and are fully functional. But, for a few of my custom builds the rock sliders are too short to use, when compared to the length of the body’s rocker panels. I have been wanting to extend the stock rock sliders for these projects, but never got around to it. Brandon recently extended a set for one of his custom builds and they turned out pretty nice. So, I decided it was time I modded a set for myself to see how it would work. Here are a few tips to help anyone that wants to attempt this same modification.

You will need 2 sets of rock sliders to make one extended set. First thing I did was cut the rock sliders as needed. To get the length I wanted I needed to leave 7 holes in front half and 4 holes for the second half.

After I cut the sliders to length I drilled holes in the ends that were cut. I than wallowed out the holes with a drill bit so they would be tapered.

Using some plastic from an old parts tree I made some pins to press into the 2 halves of the rock sliders.

Now you will need to check the fit of the mating part. Chances are you will have to do some more trimming on the pins to make everything line up properly. Take your time here and check the overall fit often. Once everything lines up, you can use some tire glue to join the two halves together.

I had to drill new holes in the frame for the rock slider’s mounting tabs, since the sliders are now longer the mounting points on the frame rails have to be re-located.

Overall shot of the finished product.

Vanquish – Currie Rock Jock Axle Install – SCX10

I was finally able to get my grubby hands on a set of the new Vanquish / Currie Rock Jock axle housings. These are fully licensed replicas of the custom 1 ton axles Currie Enterprises makes for 1:1 rock crawlers and King of the Hammers style vehicles. The 1:1 axles feature a high pinion center differential housing, which helps move your driveshafts up out of harms way. This feature also rotates the differential cover up to help avoid hitting the cover on rocks, and possibly damaging a ring gear. These new Vanquish axle housings have the same features as their 1:1 counter parts, and are fully machined from billet aluminum. Every part in this kit is a work of art. For those that aren’t familiar with my background, I was a machinist for about 15 years before coming to work for Axial. So I really appreciate the effort Vanquish put into these, as it had to be very time consuming. Especially since these housings are compatible with all the stock Axial internals, a nice bonus for sure! The machine work is executed perfectly too, with no sharp edges or burrs to be found on any of the parts. Great quality control is key, and Vanquish has it down!! Let’s get started on the conversion!

A shot of the front and rear axles, as well as the link kit for the axle install.

We will be performing surgery on my old Dingo which I converted into the new Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon.

I started with the rear axle first. A shot of all the components included with the axle kit.

Start by removing the wheels and tires.

Then unbolt the upper links, lower links and shocks from the axle housing. Then remove the rear axle.

I am going to install a few upgrades while I am making the conversion too. First up is a set of HD under drive ring and pinion gears. These gears are made from hardened steel, and are helical cut for strength and durability.

Remove the rear axle lockouts, and slide the inner axles out of the housing. I also removed the outer 5x11mm bearings as well.

Unbolt the rear axle housing, and split the case open to gain access to the ring and pinion gears.

Pull the ring and pinion out of the housing and remove the ring gear from the locker assembly. Take care not to rip the gasket between the ring gear and case, as we will need to re-use it.

After installing the new ring gear, grab the rear center section of the housing.

Slide one of the 5x11mm bearings onto the pinion shaft and insert it into place in the new housing. Then install the second 5x11mm bearing to support the drivesahft side of the pinion gear.

Insert the ring gear assembly into the housing next, and install the supplied bearing caps over the bearings.

A close-up photo of the bearing caps. Notice they can only be installed one way, the bigger diameter supports the bearings on each side of the ring gear assembly.

Next grab your axle tubes, inner axles, bearing and snap rings needed to complete this step.

You will need a set of snap ring pliers to complete this step. They can be found at any hardware or auto parts stores. Keep in mind there are specific tools for inner and outer snap rings, so make sure what you get will work. This set of snap ring pliers can pull double duty and works for either style snap ring, which is nice.

Compress the snap ring and insert it into place in the end of the axle tube.

A shot of the snap ring installed. The ring comes very close to rubbing the axle shaft, but it does clear when fully supported by all bearings.

Once both axle shafts and snap rings are in place you can install the drive pins and hexes.

Grab some blue thread lock for the next step, which is installing the tubes into the center section.

Add a dab of thread lock to the supplied M3 set screws, and insert them per the instructions to temporarily hold the tubes in place.

Both axle tubes in place, ready for the next step.

Locate the supplied axle truss and hardware.

Install the axle truss to locate/time the two axle tubes to the center section. Then, per the instructions, install the four M3 set screws that secure the axle tubes to the center section. Make sure the tops of the set screws are flush, or just below flush with the center section’s outer lip. The screws will go in a little tight, but they will go in.

Once the tubes are secured, remove the axle truss, and install the differential cover. Don’t forget to grease the ring and pinion gears before bolting the differential cover into place.

Now re-install the axle truss using blue thread lock. You can also install the link mounts at this time too.

Screw the supplied plastic differential skid to the center section of the axle housing. This piece will let the axles slide over obstacles easier than if it was just the aluminum.

You will notice there are holes in the axle tubes that aren’t utilized at this time. I installed some small M3 set screws into these holes, with a dab of blue thread lock, to keep debris out of the housings.

Notice the machined “weld marks” to replicate a real 1:1 axle truss. Another cool feature these axles offer to complete the scale look.

Rear axle done!!

Now we will move on to the front axle.

Remove the wheels, tires and all hardware that holds the front axle in place.

Remove the steering links, unbolt the c-hubs and remove the knuckle assembly with the inner axles intact.

Split the axle case to gain access to the ring and pinon gears.

If applicable, install the new ring gear onto the locker assembly.

Again, slide a 5x11mm bearing over the pinion shaft and slide it into place in the housing.

Insert the axle tubes into place per the instructions. Then install the two M3 set screws to hold the tubes in place.

Temporarily install the axle truss to locate/time the axle tubes.

Apply a little blue thread lock to the four set screws and install them to secure the axle tubes. Then remove the axle truss.

Install the four tiny set screws into the front differential cover.

Then, bolt the differential cover into place. Again, don’t forget to grease the ring and pinon gears.

Now we can install the axle truss with blue thread lock per the instructions.

Flip the axle around and install the link mounts next.

Attach the center differential skid plate with the supplied screws.

Next I installed the servo mount for the steering servo.

Locate your front knuckle/axle assemblies.

One mod I did have to make was to my aluminum c-hubs. The Axial c-hubs are threaded for use with set screws in the stock plastic housing. But, the Vanquish housing is threaded aluminum too, which just won’t work together as the threads will never be timed properly. Keep in mind the stock plastic c-hubs will bolt right up with zero issues. To fix the issue I ran into I drilled the c-hub holes out to an 1/8″ diameter to clear the M3 screws. You will need to drill the bottom hole out in front and the top hole out in back. You can also drill all four out too without any issues. They will still bolt back up to plastic housings if need be.

A shot of the complete front axle. I am going to try and keep my high clearance knuckles in use with these housings. Just need to sling them under my Jeep to see how it will all play out.

A shot of both complete axles ready to be transplanted into my SCX10. So sick!!

For more info on these housings, and a ton of other killer products, be sure to visit the Vanquish website.
http://www.vanquishproducts.com/

Keep an eye out for the next blog post that will cover installing them into my SCX10.