Axial LCX Tranmission Parts List

 

lcx-transmission-break-down

Found in: SCX10 II CRC Edition 2017 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited

Stock Gearing
LCX: 32P 13T Pinion / 56T Spur Gear

Axial LCX Tranmission Parts List

Gearing Chart

32 Pitch (Stock Gearing AX30392 or AX30395)

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Spur Gear

Pinion
56
60
64
68
11
38.69
41.45
44.22
46.98
12
35.47
38.00
40.53
43.07
13
32.74
35.08
37.42
39.75
14
30.40
32.57
34.74
36.91
15
28.37
30.40
32.43
34.45
16
26.60
28.50
30.40
32.30
17
25.04
26.82
28.61
30.40

32 Pitch (Overdrive Gearing AX30401)

_
Spur Gear

Pinion
56
60
64
68
11
34.04
36.47
38.90
41.33
12
31.20
33.43
35.66
37.89
13
28.80
30.86
32.91
34.97
14
26.74
28.65
30.56
32.47
15
24.96
26.74
28.53
30.31
16
23.40
25.07
26.74
28.41
17
22.02
23.60
25.17
26.74

32 Pitch (Underdrive Gearing AX30402)

_
Spur Gear

Pinion
56
60
64
68
11
43.78
46.91
50.04
53.16
12
40.13
43.00
45.87
48.73
13
37.05
39.69
42.34
44.98
14
34.40
36.86
39.31
41.77
15
32.11
34.40
36.69
38.99
16
30.10
32.25
34.40
36.55
17
28.33
30.35
32.38
34.40

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AXIAL LCX TRANSMISSION PARTS LIST

AXA0023 M2.6x8mm Cap Head Screw
AXA013 M2x6mm Cap Head Screw
AXA1045 M4 Nylon Locking Flanged Nuts
AXA1218 Bearing 5x10x4mm
AXA1225 Bearing 8x16x5mm
AX30162 Straight Pin
AX30394 20T Drive Gear
AX30413 Slipper Spring
AX30435 Steel Outdrive Shaft Set
AX30190 Shaft
AXA146 M3x12mm Socket Head Screw
AX31026 Slipper Plate
AX31027 Spur Gear 32P 56T
AX31068 Slipper Pad
AX31531 LCX Transmission Case
AX31539 LCX Top Shaft (Coming Soon)
AX31585 Gear Set (48P 28T/ 48P 52T)

AX90060 SCX10 II 2017 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited CRC Box To Trail Guide

2017JeepWrangler_CRC_Box2TrailGuide

Get geared up! You’re moments away from taking the SCX10 II™ 2017 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited CRC 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD RTR on an adventure, whether it’s in your backyard or trails at the nearest park. The latest addition to the SCX10 II™ line makes going off-road easy, worry free and perhaps most importantly stylish thanks to the CRC body features and accessories. The 2017 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited CRC is loaded with performance features too which are all detailed HERE. In this Axial Blog we’re going to show you how easy it is to wrap up the few details needed to get the rig powered up an on the trails. Let’s get started.

Axial Wrangler CRC 3

STEP 1

Axial Wrangler CRC 4

Axial Wrangler CRC 5

Axial Wrangler CRC 6

Axial Wrangler CRC 7

If you haven’t jumped into the box by now, what are you waiting for a bus? Carefully cut the factory seals on the box and slide out the contents. The truck will be secured to the inner packaging and you’ll notice some additional bags taped to the bottom of the truck support. Remove the bag of extra parts, radio and manuals. Please take some time to read through the manuals to familiarize yourself with the model, features and adjustments that can be made. Once you’ve done that, you can take a pair of side cutters and clip the zip-ties securing the rig to the cardboard.

STEP 2

Axial Wrangler CRC 8

Axial Wrangler CRC 9

Axial Wrangler CRC 10

It’s released! Time to get 2017 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited CRC powered up. First remove all four body clips from the top of the body. Now before you tear off the body, the truck is equipped with LED lights. The lights are attached to the body and connect to the power source on the speed control with two connectors. Gently remove the body, tilt it to one side and you can now you can access the battery tray. If necessary, the body can be completely removed by disconnecting the LED’s at the plugs.

STEP 3

Axial Wrangler CRC 25

By now, you’ve probably already selected a 7.2V NiMh or 7.4V LiPo battery and appropriate charger. While the battery is out of your SCX10 II, charge the battery. While waiting, you can adjust the battery chemistry type jumper plug on the electronic speed control if necessary. The jumper plug comes from the factory set in LiPo mode. If you have selected a NiMh battery to run, you may want to move the plug to NiMh mode for optimum performance. Only switch the plug if you planning on running NiMh batteries exclusively. If you plan on switching or are just uncertain of your battery types, leave the jumper plug in the factory set location.

STEP 4

Axial Wrangler CRC 26

Battery still charging? Move along to installing batteries in the Tacitc TTX300 transmitter. Don’t grab random AA batteries pillaged from devices around the house. Always start with a new set off AA batteries and install them in the bottom of the transmitter noting the polarity. The transmitter requires four cells.

STEP 5

Axial Wrangler CRC 11

Axial Wrangler CRC 12

When your vehicle’s battery has finished charging, you can install it in the truck and it’s very easy to do so. Simply release the velcro strap, slide the battery into the cradle and cinch the velcro closed. Don’t plug it in yet. You’ll need to power up your radio first and then connect the vehicle battery plug to the ESC plug. The plugs act as your on/off switch. After the battery is plugged in, you can re-install the body (plug in the LED’s if you removed the plugs) and slip all four body clips back on to their posts.

TIME TO HIT THE TRAIL

Axial Wrangler CRC 1

Adventure awaits! Head outside and get a feel for your new SCX10 II 2017 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited CRC. Practice driving in your yard or a field, get use to the steering, throttle and reversing before heading out to a long trail drive. The SCX10 II is built tough but it’s always better to take things slowly and ease into your hobby fun. Remember to take pictures along the way and post them with the hashtag #AxialAdventures so other adventurers can see your truck and travels.

 

The Perfect Fit: SORRCA Class 1 Ready SCX10 / SCX10 II | PART 6: TREADS

AX17_SCX10_II_SORRCA_CLASS1_part5Treads

In our mission to show you how the Axial SCX10 and SCX10 II are a perfect fit for SORRCA Class 1 events, we’ve organized the rules and broke them down into six total focus groups. We’ve reached the final focus and that is the wheels, tires and widths to fit your vehicle in. This topic requires some thought and product purchase choices will require work on your part to make sure your rig complies. Let’s dive in.

FOCUS 6: TREADS
SORRCA Rule • 106mm / 4.19″ Max tire size including spares.

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Looks like the Axial Perfect Fit has hit a snag. Unfortunately, the treads within the Axial tire line-up are on the larger side of the SORRCA rule and therefore you’ll need to search for tires that fit this rule and your traction needs. If you are trying to keep that factory look, consider using a licensed wheel from the Axial selection HERE.


 

SORRCA Rule • Wheels must be aligned within the body wheel wells (center of wheels to center of wheel wells +/- 1/2 inch total combined)

SORRCA Rule • The tread of the tires cannot extend outside of the wheel wells more than 1/2 of the tread width, flairs can be added to reach minimum spec.

Team KNK Hardware TTC4 2017-88
When choosing your wheel and tire combination, you’ll want to make certain that the wheel off-set is correct, consider hex hub widths, and tire overhang on the rim so it does not exceed the measurements provided by SORRCA. The vehicle above has wheels that are obviously outside of the body width; this rig would not fit within SORRCA’s rules.


SORRCA Rule • Tires can never extend beyond the body’s bumpers or the rear of any truck bed. (Any stingers,fairleads, shackles, bolts, etc. are not considered part of a bumper when determining this.)

ax90046_SCX10_2-34_800px

As Axial SCX10 and SCX10 II’s arrive from the factory, the wheels and tires are located behind the bumpers. When lengthening links or altering bumper positions, you’ll want to make sure the wheels will still fit behind the bumper. If you are making modifications as such, make sure you fit within some of the previous rules mentioned in our series like sectioning and bobbing.


 

SORRCA Rule • Gates will be a minimum of 11″ wide (so mind your width).

Team KNK Hardware TTC4 2017-165

Gate width plays a key role in determining the width of your trail rig once you start customizing. The stock SCX10 width is 8.8” and the SCX10 is 8.9” which will leave some space to clear gates as long as your wheel and tire choice combination result in a factory width in order to fit under the body. If you choose a combination that is wider, you’re putting the squeeze on your rig through the gates. A bigger concern is the angles in which you need to proceed through some gates if a minimum 11” gate is used. Things can get tight.

GET SORRCA READY
That wraps up the series on the Axial SCX10/ SCX10 II Perfect Fit for SORRCA blog focus. SORRCA has done an excellent job in providing guidelines for everyone to follow so the rigs stay scale and the competition stays close. Our descriptions of how scale Axial trucks fit into these rule sets has been interpereted and presented to the best of our knowledge. Both Axial trail truck platforms continue to be the perfect choice for drivers who want to drive scale, customize with ease and tackle the trails with commanding performance.

 

The Perfect Fit: SORRCA Class 1 Ready SCX10 / SCX10 II | PART 4: BODY

AX17_SCX10_II_SORRCA_CLASS_part4

We left you hanging there in Part 3 didn’t we? We tell you not to modify the body and then tell you about a follow up blog on Body Mods. Well, here we are to show you a little can be done and some things to completely steer clear from doing. SORRCA in efforts to keep rigs on the trail in a recognizable scale form has determined performance gaining modifications like boat siding and sectioning bodies will not be permitted within the Class 1 rules. Here are some details to consider when preparing your Axial SCX10 or SCX10 II for a SORRCA event.

FOCUS 4: BODY MODS

SORRCA Rule • Boat sides are not allowed.

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The flat sides of the SCX10™ II 2017 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited CRC edition conform to the SORRCA rule set.

Ok Gilligan, you can’t modify your ship in order to run it ashore. Boat siding is a process in which the lower rocker panel and sometime door area is bent to an inward facing angle. This is done to help gain body ground clearance and also allow the body to glide over rocks and obstacles rather than possibly getting hung up. The angle of the modified panel simulates the angled hull of the boat which is how the name came about. All of Axial’s bodies from the 2000 Jeep® Cherokee, to the 2012 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon and even the new 2017 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited CRC all have body sides perpendicular to the ground and fit within the rules. Resist the urge to tweak your Axial body with a pair of seaming pliers and you’re good to go.


 

SORRCA Rule  • Any removal of material from behind the front wheel well (except trim/molding) is considered a boat side.

Cutting the body along the red line would be considered 'Boat Siding."

Cutting the body along the red line would be considered ‘Boat Siding.”

Put the scissors down and step away from the body. It is ok to trim your fender flares or molding from the body, but in doing so, make certain not to remove material from the fender on an angle greater than the removed flare. Simply altering the angle of the wheel-well opening is considered boat siding and can gain an advantage on the trail as well as take away from the scale look SORRCA is trying to maintain. 


 

SORRCA Rule • Sectioning or narrowing of the body is not allowed.

Trug

Sectioning and narrowing a body, although more commonly practiced on ABS hardbodies because they are easier to glue back together is a way to reduce the chances of the body hanging up on rocks and obstacles. In this practice you are physically taking material away from the body in order to gain precious clearance that can help you gain an advantage. In doing so, you take away from the realistic scale appearance of a factory look.

 

GET SORRCA READY
If you are looking for every advantage possible during a SORRCA event, running factory Axial bodies with minor tweaks is an advantage. Consider the lightweight Lexan SCX10 II Jeep Cherokee XJ or Jeep Rubicon or Jeep Wrangler Unlimited with the flares removed. This will give you additional wheel clearance that could make a difference on the trails. On to Part 5; bed time…

SCX10 II Rubicon Trail Adventure With Photo Pro Brad Perry

 

SCX10 II Rubicon Trail Adventure

Mention the name Rubicon Trail and just about anyone you speak to will say they’ve heard of it whether they are into 4×4 off-roading or not. If by some reason, like you’ve been abducted by aliens for most of your life and you’ve never heard of the Rubicon Trail, here is the short of it. The trail’s origination actually began as an Indian trading route and in the 1800’s became a service road, but over time lessened in use and the terrain degraded. The scenic trail with unique terrain then became a favorite for explorers and adventurers. In the early 1950’s, the trail sprung back to life as the Jeepers Jamboree event picked the trail as its home. The trail that spans from from Georgetown, CA to Tahoma, CA at Lake Tahoe and has basically become internationally known as an ultimate destination for hiking, 4X4′s, motorcycle or quad, or mountain bike adventures.

That leads us to the story of Brad Perry, a hiker, adventurist, professional photographer and more importantly, an Axial RC fanatic. Brad joined the media at Axialfest 2017 and captured some amazing moments from the event, so our eyes were on his work. Then he posted a photo (above) from his recent trek on the Rubicon Trail, that he organized himself, to his social media. Brad had our attention once again and we got a hold of him to tell his story of the trip.

BVP29rv

About:
Name: Brad Perry
Age: 32
Hometown: Born and raised in Livermore, CA but I have lived in South Lake Tahoe, CA for the past 11 years
Profession: Owner of Von Perry Photography and Freelance photographer
Hobbies: Bouldering, Hiking, Riding all types of bikes

Prep:
Prior hikes – I hike almost every day for work. If I’m not out shooting some kind of action sports, I’m in my local area hiking around with my wife, dog and RC. When it comes to the Rubicon I had hiked the trail multiple times for other photo assignments so I had a lot of prior knowledge of the trail.
Physical prep – I knew I could hike the mileage with no issue but I had to do a lot of overall prep. I did 3 prior hikes that were around 12-14 miles each. I had to figure out what mileage the truck was getting so I didn’t run out of battery power and I had to figure out my overall pace so I could plan on being picked up at the finish.

Gear:
Clothing  – Shorts and my Axial t-shirt
Shoes – Altra Timps
Backpack –North Face Mega Mouth
Headlamp- Petzl Tikka
Supplies – Sony A7s Camera, Canon 16-35mm and a 50mm lens, folding tripod, iPhone6s, tools if anything breaks on trail.
Extra parts – Front and rear drivelines, C-hubs and knuckles, steering servo, a servo horn and a few misc screws.

Nutrition:
Food and hydration – Two PB&J sandwiches, one Cliff Bar and some beef jerky. Two Lemonade Rockstar Recovery energy drinks. 50oz of Skratch Labs exercise hydration mix and 50oz of water.

BVP03rv

The Rig:
Axial SCX10 II RTR
Upgrades – Axial 1.9 BFGoodrich Krawler T/A’s, Vanquish shock hoops, Vanquish Method 105’s, CI single stage foams, HR hardened trans gears, Proline 4runner body
Special mods – None
Electronics – Castle Mamba-X with a 1410 3800kv brushless system. Spektrum DX4C radio system. Stock steering servo.
Lighting  No lighting on the rig.
Batteries – I took 6 Venom 2s 5000mha 50c batteries. I used about 28,500mha in total.
The radios batteries held up just fine.

BVP61rv

Challenges:
The trail itself is very challenging just to hike. It’s not your normal well groomed hiking trail. Lots of loose rock and silt covered slabs. Traction and footing is a constant issue. I knew I wanted to go fast but I needed to be safe at the same time. Twisting an ankle out that far with no support is something you have in the back of your mind the whole time. I was also on the trail during very low traffic times so the hopes of a ride out were low.

Tough obstacles- I had it in my mind that areas like Big Sluice and Little Sluice were going to be my biggest issues. The water crossing at Buck Island was also a worry. Funny thing was the hardest obstacle ended up being the Buck Island Dam. It’s a little taller than a curb and is only passible in one direction with the truck. When you go the other way you have to go way up by the bathrooms and down into one of the trailside camps. The other thing that had me worried was the amount of silt on the trail. In some places it was 3 inches deep. Other than that the SCX10 II handled it all like a champ.

Damage:
I only had one issue on both passes and it was a total mistake. In the first few hours of my first trip I bent over to tie my shoe and hit the trigger. I sent my truck into a huge rock at full speed and stripped the plastic servo horn. I quickly pulled out the tools and had it fixed in minutes. The overall performance of the SCX10 II RTR was amazing.

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HOG- On my first trip I rolled 6 times in total but only ended up on my roof turtled twice to where I had to pick it up. On the second trip I had a few more because I was going a lot faster. There were no points where the truck couldn’t make it up something and I had to pick it up over the obstacle. That’s one of the best parts of this trail.
Memorable Moment- It’s hard to narrow down just one part of the trail as being the most memorable. One of my favorite areas on the trail is the top of the slabs overlooking Buck Island Lake and the whole surrounding valley. My most memorable moment was an older gentlemen asking me if I was hiking or driving the trail? I chuckled and said both. I have to place the tires in the right places don’t I? He laughed and agreed.

BVP34rv

Overall Experience- I started both of my hikes around 4AM completely solo. Hiking on the Loon Lake side on the open granite slabs under the stars was great. On my second trip leaving Tahoma you have about 6 miles of heavily wooded trail. I found my mind racing a little at times thinking I was hearing animals in the bushes. Wondering if a bear was going to come out and start chasing the truck like a playful dog. I did both of my trips mid-week so I ran into very little traffic on the trail. I only saw 2 people my first time and 6 or so on the second. The trail is really amazing because it’s consistently challenging end to end. Even if you try to make it easy on yourself you still end up doing a great deal of difficult crawling. I stopped at the same places along the trail on both trips. I took breaks at Buck Island and Observation Point and then ate food at the middle point at Rubicon Springs. When I first did the trail I parked my car at Loon Lake and left it there with the plan of picking it up the next day. I had so much fun the first time I took two days to recover and hiked it back the other direction to pick my car up. The Rubicon is a blast and I would do it again any time.

I definitely have a few people to thank for the helping get this done. Everyone at CKRC, Castle Creations, Venom Power, SF Threads, Scale Ultra, SBG, Altra Running and Axial Racing! I also couldn’t have done this without the support of my wife. She sat in a parking lot waiting to pick me up with no cell service for hours, then 2 days later woke up at 3am to drop me off so I could do it all again.

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Trip Stats
Trip 1
Start-The Rubicon sign at the Loon Lake Staging
Finish-The sign at “Tahoma Staging” – McKinney-Rubicon Springs Staging
Miles: 15.77
Time: 8 hours 31 minutes 46 seconds
Vert: 2744ft
Rest: 3-10 minute breaks
Weight: Backpack was 21lbs

Trip 2
Start: The sign at “Tahoma Staging” – McKinney-Rubicon Springs Staging
Finish: The Rubicon sign at the Loon Lake Staging
Miles 15.77
Time: 6 hours 42 minutes 47 seconds
Vert: 2502ft
Rest 3-10 minute breaks
Weight: backpack 21lbs

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Adventure Inspiration
Brad’s trip was certainly an exciting trip from the details given and through some amazing photos. His trip was not the first time an RC rig hit the Rubicon Trail. Among many others, the Axial team hit the trails too with the release of the SCX10™ 2012 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon; you can see that adventure HERE. We’re sure there will be many more adventures too that will hit the terrain with an Axial RC trail machine in hand. But Brad’s story is inspirational. Brad hit the trail alone, with the right amount of supplies and a nearly stock SCX10 II rig that made the length of the trail without major issue. Also in record time for an RC machine with Brad pushing hard both driving and hiking. We hope this inspires you to take your Axial Adventure to the next level too. Find and design your own RC experience and be sure to tag it with #AxialAdventure as it is becoming a way of life that many want to see and share.

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Install a Fuel Cell/Parts Bin into Your Axial SCX10 II

Install a Fuel Cell/Parts Bin into Your Axial SCX10 II

We recently posted a video to Youtube of our favorite tools and parts we bring with us when we hit the trails (see it here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mZxm84NMJr0). With some further brainstorming, we came up with a cool idea that let’s your SCX10 II carry it’s own spare parts! All you need is a Yeti fuel cell fitted between the trucks shock hoops. Here’s how to do it.

TOOLS NEEDED:
1. 2.0mm Hex Wrench

LIST OF PARTS USED:
AXA0113 Axial M3x6mm Hex Socket Button Head Screw
AXA144 Axial M3x8mm Hex Socket Flat Head Screw
AXA1105 Axial Cone Washer
AX31125 Axial Yeti™ Fuel Cell

Let’s get started!

Step 1

Install a Fuel Cell/Parts Bin into Your Axial SCX10 II
Before installing the fuel cell, I attached the top and added a pair of AXA0113 M3x6mm BH screws to the holes I won’t be using. This is not really necessary but does help give the cell a more ‘finished’ look.

TIP: Prior to installation, paint the fuel cell. This will give your rig a more finished look.

Step 2

Install a Fuel Cell/Parts Bin into Your Axial SCX10 II
The first install step is to remove the top shock mount screws. This gives us access to the bracing between the shock mount hoops.

Step 3

Install a Fuel Cell/Parts Bin into Your Axial SCX10 II
Slide the assembled fuel cell in between the shock hoops as shown and line up the holes with the bosses on the cell. Secure with the AZA144 M3x8mm FH screws and AXA1105 Cone Washers. The red arrow points to the mounting location.

Step 4

Install a Fuel Cell/Parts Bin into Your Axial SCX10 II
Boom! That’s it! You can take the lid off, pour your spare parts in there and close it back up. The fuel cell could also be used to house lighting or winch controllers, but be warned that it is not waterproof.

Words and photos by Tony Phalen

 

Product Spotlight: AX31150 Axial Clear Inner Fenders

AX31150 Axial Inner Fenders

While prepping my truck for this years #AXIALFEST2017 (ok, my wife’s truck), I happened to notice one of my fellow co-workers bolting on a set of inner fenders onto his SCX10 II XJ. I asked him where he got those and he informed me it was an actual Axial product, just maybe one that wasn’t so well known.

Of course, I had to investigate further – AX31150 is in fact a molded piece of .40″ clear Lexan that not only includes 4 inner fenders, it also has floor panels for trucks that don’t have them (the SCX10 for example). In addition to giving you extra space to mount electronics, it also acts as a barrier to help keep mud, water and other debris from entering the chassis.

Product Spotlight: AX31150 Axial Clear Inner Fenders

As you can see, it comes clear and can be painted any color you want (I’m going with from-the-factory black). A strip of double-sided tape is included to securely attach them to the side rails. Another cool thing is that they are a universal fit; you can trim them to match almost any body you decide to use.

So, for those of you that like to do some serious trailing but are worried about splashing grit and grime all up in your chassis, here’s a simple solution. I’ve added a few pix of these mounted on the SCX10 II, however as you can see I’ve left off the floor panels since this particular truck already comes with them.

Product Spotlight: AX31150 Axial Clear Inner Fenders

Product Spotlight: AX31150 Axial Clear Inner Fenders

Product Spotlight: AX31150 Axial Clear Inner Fenders

Product Spotlight: AX31150 Axial Clear Inner Fenders

AX31150 Axial SCX10 Wheel Wells – .040″ (Clear)

ACORA Family Fun BBQ 2016

adventures_acora

October 21st – 23rd 2016

In true family fun attitude, ACORA puts on a BBQ that is supported by family and friends. The event is held at Azusa Canyon (San Gabriel Valley OHV) with approval from the US Forest Service. Vendors from the off-road industry have joined in to support the event and were set to move in Friday afternoon and Saturday morning. The volunteers of the event were also welcomed to roll-in Friday and camp for the weekend.

First up on Saturday was the Renegade Rock Runners RC Club hosting an adventure run that was styled after the best in the west AXIALFEST. Several people showed up to have some fun on the course for the day and enjoy the gates that the club laid down. Later that day the club also hosted a sled pull and sumo fight for the RC cars.

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As Saturday progressed it was time to drop the cones on the course for the full scale amateur rock crawl competition taking place on Sunday. We spent a couple hours getting the preliminary courses set up for each of the classes (Stock, Modified, Open).

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20161022_173551The competition format this year was a simplified version of the W.E. Rock Rules; there is no point violation for reverse. Another change we made this year was to have the competitors run course 1 and then upon finishing head to the back of the line to run course 2. The courses were designed to give them the opportunity to think outside the box to avoid hitting the cones and achieve the lowest score. Once everyone was finished the scores would be calculated to show the top five from each class and they will be given the opportunity to run in the shootout course. In the shootout the 1st guys run the risk of losing the top podium if the other competitor have a better run. This means that you need to have a clean run in order to retain your top standing.

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Stock: (No Shootout)
1st – Jason Konczak
2nd – Jamie Duncanson
3rd – Tyler Soderman
4th – Brandon Burdett

Mod:
1st – Steven Soliz
2nd – Brandon Barberena
3rd – Jeff Chapman
4th – Marclino Sanchez
5th – Adam Mark

Open:
1st – John Rocha
2nd – James Williams
3rd – Chris Miller
4th – James Gibson
5th – Brandon Cortez

We set up a Shootout course for each class and the competitors were ready to go. They got a few minutes to all walk the course and then it was game on. The courses were longer and designed to challenge the driver and the spotter even more. When it was all said and done, the leaders were able to maintain their top spot.

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14691980_10155372860352995_4204352989583091178_oFinal Standings at the ACORA Amateur Rock Crawl

Stock: (No Shootout)
1st – Jason Konczak
2nd – Jamie Duncanson
3rd – Tyler Soderman

Mod:
1st – Steven Soliz
2nd – Brandon Barberena
3rd – Marclino Sanchez

Open:
1st – John Rocha
2nd – James Williams
3rd – Chris Miller

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