Building the full size SCX10XJ: Part 1

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Words: Scott G

When setting out to build a trail worthy rig, so many things go through your mind. What do you expect from the rig? What do you plan to do with it? What budget do you have to work with? These are all extremely important things to consider when selecting the donor vehicle. However, just know that no matter what you plan for, there will be extras needed, to include the expectations, plans, and budget. Building a 4×4 vehicle to go deep into the elements is not an easy task, and like most things in life, you get what you pay for. This means you have to outfit your choice with the best components available within your budget that will allow you to attain your goals.

This is not at all unlike developing the new SCX10, as all of the same parameters are considered, to include performance expectations and budget restraints. Not budget restraints for development, but budget restraints of our fans and customers. We often read the forums and see what people would like to see in the Axial vehicles. We are forced to make some difficult decisions when finalizing the package, as we want to include the world with these rigs, but also don’t want to ask for $699 for an RTR to get in the game. It is like that with all Axial products, so we do our best to aim for the sweet spot, enough features to perform at the top level, with a reasonable price tag. This is not an easy task. We are faced with the same decisions when building a full size rig. Do we want a supercharged V8, 1000 minimum on the RTI ramp, seating for 4, bulletproof axles? Of course we do, but the budget doesn’t allow for all of them, so we settle for what we can and have a blast doing it.

One of the most common things we read is…. “Oh no, not another Jeep vehicle”, well, I am here to tell you that most of us are Jeep people, so get over it. The Jeep brand is synonymous with the art of back country exploration with extreme reliability, exactly what we strive for with our little brand. It is a perfect marriage and we are happy.

When looking into new options for the new SCX10, we did what all outdoor enthusiasts do, we went into the woods to think about it, to do a little research. We were checking out all the rigs out on the trail and noticed that the XJ was a very popular rig for the most hardcore wheeler and for family back road exploration. We saw XJ’s that were exo-caged on 40′s all the way to bone stock 4×4′s loaded with the whole family and dog. This platform was exactly what we were looking for. It is one of the most popular 4×4 vehicles ever built, with millions of them on the road. Some say that Jeep actually invented the SUV with this release. It was not adapted right away for off-road use, as the old guard (Read: Wrangler, CJ5 and CJ7 owners) looked down upon these Jeeps, calling them cars with big tires, and promptly showing their owners the direction toward the nearest shopping mall or soccer field.

Some XJ inspiration we found on YouTube…

I personally had this experience with my 1993 Jeep grand Cherokee, I was given directions to the soccer field, immediately preceding my climbing an extremely nasty Granite rock face on Los Coyotes Indian reservation back in 1996. The CJ owners immediately began to bicker and argue that the other should climb it. Neither one did, nor did they express themselves again to me on the trail. They learned that day that a Unitized chassis wasn’t the end of the world, and that coil springs are like magic. The Cherokee (XJ) shared the same front suspension with the ZJ, though the XJ had leaf springs in the back, something the Jeep guys were used to back then. Any of the XJ’s and ZJ’s on the trail were hand built, as there were very few aftermarket components available with the exception of suspension which was primarily available to fit larger tires. We told some of our JK friends about our XJ desires and they immediately started flowing some memes our way, most of which we cant publish, but here are a few gems that made us laugh…

xjs

Thanks for the support guys…sheesh.

Fast forward 20 years, and these old grocery getters, mall crawlers or soccer field shuttlers are now extremely common to find on the trail. The off-road community has more than accepted them and many aftermarket companies now make a decent living supporting them. The hard part, finding a clean one-owner version with no rust and low miles, kind of like finding a Unicorn. One of Axial’s more predominant partners, Currie Enterprises, was at the forefront of developing suspension for these rigs so that they could be raced in a desert series called Jeep Speed back in the day. We consulted the Currie family and were introduced to Matt Chapman, the owner of the Cherokee that we based our SCX10XJ off of. As we have done in the past, we like to build the full size version of our scale rigs (see here…) to go out and experience what they can do, and stay on the forefront with regards to what the community is doing. At this time, Matt’s Cherokee was bone stock, as it had just been purchased and not modified yet. We elected to team with Matt and the Currie’s in effort to help develop the Full size XJ into an awesome trail machine all the while developing and testing our SCX10 II in tandem.

Here is a shot of Matt’s XJ when he got it, no rust with 150K miles…

After a good amount of research, we started to compile a list of necessities. We knew the rig had to be able to go with 4 door JK’s on 37′s, as most of Matt’s friends were rolling newer JK’s. We needed at least 35″ tires. Fitting 35′s under the Cherokee would require some proper fender flares and keeps the cops in Moab at bay. Notch Customs said “35″ tires with a 4″ lift, some welding required”. Currie makes a great suspension system for the XJ as well as their bulletproof Rock Jock 44 axles, and you know we love the performance of Icon Shocks. So, what we really needed was some armor. We looked long and hard at so many companies making XJ parts, and there is some awesome stuff out there. Russ at Notch Customs introduced us to JCR Off-Road, who ended up having one of the most complete armor systems available. Then we needed some lighting, the natural choice was Rigid powered by sPOD. Almost forgot wheels and tires. In effort to make the full size version look more like the RC, we elected to run a 35X12.50X17 BFG KO2 All Terrain wrapped around Method Mesh wheels. The 17″ wheel looks closer to a 1.9 than a 15″ wheel. Of course we needed some nice tone out of the 4.0 straight 6, so the XJ would need a Magnaflow exhaust. We had some details to sort but the main wish list was assembled!

First things first, the rig had to be made as reliable as possible by going through everything mechanical. We changed all the fluids, belts, hoses, pretty much everything we could to ensure reliability.

So, building a full size rig is just like building a scaler, get the base kit, then select all the options you wish to install. Here is our list!

2000 Jeep Cherokee XJ Parts list:
Currie Rock Jock 44 front high pinion axle with 4:56 gears
Currie Rock Jock 44 rear axle with 4:56 gears
Currie Rock Jock 4.5″ suspension system
Currie Antirock Sway bar system
EATON E-Locker rear, Detroit Locker front
JCR Vanguard Front winch bumper – No stinger
JCR Rear Bumper – tire carrier ready
JCR XJ Classic sliders
JCR Transfer case skid plate
JCR Gas tank skid plate
JCR Adventure roof rack
Notch Customs fender flares
Rigid 50″ E-Series LED bar
Rigid Dually x2 (front and rear bumper)
PSC Ram assist kit – steering
ICON Vehicle Dynamics 2.0 Aluminum shocks
Magnaflow exhaust
sPOD – Source with Bluetooth control
17X9 Method Wheels – Mesh (5)
35X12.50X17 BFGoodrick KO2 All Terrain tires (5)

Before we started the build process, Jamie Seymour, Axial’s R&D Industrial Designer and resident rendering expert whipped up this drawing for us to envision the build…

Stay tuned as we add more of this story in the coming weeks……

U4RC Rock Racing – Glen Helen Series Finale

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Race Report: U4RC Staff
Photos: James C. Goad

It’s a wrap for the inaugural U4RC short course rock racing series! And “wow” what a series it was, with tons of never seen before extreme r/c action. U4RC has combined the world of r/c rock crawling and r/c off road racing with a “scale” twist. This exciting new genre of “scale” racing is exploding across the United States, with series either running or slated to start in the near future in several states. And U4RC is very proud to be partnered up with Axial Racing for 2014.

Previous to the start of the last event, the guys at U4RC were hard at work making some changes to the course

Axial Racing’s partnership with U4RC is a perfect match. Especially since one or more Axial Racing rigs are legal in all four U4RC classes. Not to mention they are the overall dominating manufacture at U4RC events. We have had several drivers show up with “box stock” Axial rigs. One of which was a Poison Spyder Customs Wraith that took home a 4th place finish right out of the box!

On to the Finals racing info! With a total of over 50 individual rigs registered to race throughout the 4 classes. This was the largest U4RC event to date.

Heat racing started with the 1.9 Trail class, which is an excellent entry/beginner level class into U4RC racing. The action started immediately at the start /finish line, with driver’s battling for the” hole shot” into turn #1. Most rigs in the 1.9T class are your typical “scale” rigs. Of which consist of 95% Axial rigs, namely; Rubicon’s, Honcho’s, Dingo’s, and SCX10’s, both stock and highly modified. There was tons of action throughout the day in 1.9T, although these rigs are slightly slower than their 2.2 counterparts they are definitely not short of excitement. The 1.9T classes top finishers for the day were James Williams #95 with 1st place, Jerry Ellifritz #88 with 2nd place, both Axial Rubicons and Steve Richardson #90 taking the 3rd spot, with an Axial SCX10.

The 1.9 Competitor class was not short of excitement either. Jason Fletcher’s SCX10 based FB rig had a great showing. And word from Axial Racing Team driver Jake Wright is of a soon to be completed, SCX10 based U4 rig that is guaranteed to take the 1.9C class by storm!

2.2 Competitor class is the most popular class right now at U4RC races. And it’s no doubt why with several Axial rigs (Wraith, EXO, RidgeCrest, 2.2” clad SCX10’s) that are legal in the class. The high flying action started with Heat #1 and didn’t subside till the podium was settled in the Main. The rigs in this class provide a lot of “aired out eye candy” for the spectators and drivers alike. This class was also dominated by Axial rigs, with Rich Boltz #4 taking the top spot with his AR60 rear axled EXO buggy, Derek Gan #711 took 2nd place with his Wraith, and Reed Claxton #4415 grabbed 3rd place with his Poison Spyder Wraith. The rock sections were tough and these drivers and their rigs conquered them without issues.

Last, but far from least is the 2.2 Trophy class. This is what we consider our “U4RC grass roots class”. 2.2T is a builder’s class, with some of the absolute most realistic rigs in any form of r/c racing to date. With a minimum weight and stricter “scale” requirements, it makes for true to life racing action! Several of the custom builds run Axial drivetrain alongside of Wraiths that have been tweaked to meet class weight specs. Don’t be fooled though, these drivers flog their rigs just as hard as the lighter classes. Top honors in 2.2T were handed out to Chris Pickering #01 1st place, Justin Bodewitz #13 in 2nd and Shawn Jones took home a 3rd place finish. All three top rigs were Axial based, with Justin’s rig being a Wraith.

U4RC is excited and looking forward to our winter series, which starts November 23rd at Glen Helen R/C Raceway, with a full race schedule every month going into 2014.

Special thanks to all the competitors and volunteers that help to make this exciting form of racing what it is, we appreciate your support!

U4RC

For more information about U4RC and upcoming events, be sure to visit and like their FB page here.

Full Option RTR SCX10 Jeep

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Axial offers several optional upgrade parts for the Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon RTR and Kit. Here’s a quick run down of what is installed and why you may want to use these items.

A couple photos of the completed full option build. Axial offers complete body kits for the Jeep, part number AX04035, that includes the clear Lexan body and all the scale accessories. We also offer just the replacement clear Jeep bodies as well, part number AX04033.

First option we will cover is Axial’s simple LED kit, part number AX24257. The simple LED kit comes with 4 white and 2 red LED lights to keep you running long after the sun goes down. I used two small light buckets from Axial’s Light Bucket Set, part number AX80045, and attached them to the front bumper mount with long M3 screws. I used Axial’s LED lens set, part number AX80049, to cover the LEDs front and rear for a more realistic look. The lens kit includes both clear and yellow lens covers to give users a couple options. Need even more light? Add our NVS system, part number AX24251, for the ultimate scale light system.

A couple shots of the rear LEDs with the clear lens covers in place.

Next option added was our new fully licensed Icon shocks, part number AX30103. These come standard in the Jeep kit, but are an option part for the RTR. These shocks feature a new and improved CNC machined shock piston for smoother action through the range of travel. The new Icon shocks also feature clear coated polished aluminum bodies, complete with aluminum faux reservoirs. The main body of the shock is threaded for quick ride height adjustments and pre-load tuning ability. Like their full size counterparts these shocks are completely rebuildable, tunable and offer consistent handling all while adding some of that Icon bling to your SCX10™ chassis.

Axial’s aluminum link kit, part number AX30550, for the SCX10™ was the next upgrade we added. Upgrade your stock plastic links to high quality aluminum. Aluminum links have less flex than the stock plastic links which helps your vehicle track straighter in all conditions. This link kit includes aluminum suspension and steering links, as well as all hardware and rod ends required to complete the conversion.

A shot of the steering links. If you just want to upgrade your steering links only Axial offers a steering upgrade kit, part number AX30426, as well. Upgrading your steering links to aluminum with improve steering response in all conditions, especially in hard binds associated with rock crawling. Another option part that can be seen here is Axial’s HD 25t aluminum servo horn, part number AX30836. Axial’s HD aluminum servo horn provides more responsive steering with less chance of stripping the internal splines over the stock plastic servo horn. Clamping style head for secure mounting in high stress applications. Available in 23, 24 and 25 tooth spline counts.

In this photo you can see a handful of upgrades to improve steering performance and increase the strength of the front axle. Aluminum knuckles, part number AX30496, aluminum knuckles help your vehicle track more consistently in all situations. Combine our knuckles with our aluminum C-hubs, part number AX30495, for the ultimate steering precision. Another option part installed here is Axial’s CVD’s, part number AX30464, for the SCX10™ axles. The CVD’s provide more steering throw that the stock dog bone set-up which is great for tight, technical trail runs. CVD’s also have less slop than the stock set-up for increased efficiency.

Moving on to the rear axle we installed our aluminum axle lockouts, part number AX30494. Axial’s aluminum axle lockouts are more rigid than the stock plastic lockouts, which will allow the vehicle to track better in all situations.

Axial’s HD motor plate was our next upgrade, part number AX30860. Our heavy duty motor plate is for any vehicle running our AX10 transmission. CNC machined from 4.5mm thick billet aluminum, with integrated heatsink fins to help motors run cooler on those all day expeditions. A must have for any R/C overland adventurist! Axial also offers 13T, 14T and 15T steel pinion gears and an 80T spur gear to give end users an array of gear ratios to choose from. Add more torque for low speed crawling to your SCX10™ by installing Axial’s 55T motor. Or if more speed is your thing, add Axial’s 20T motor for higher top speeds. Another option part that we installed here is Axial’s dig system for the Wraith transmission, part number AX30793. This conversion also requires use of our Wraith Dig Transmission Case, part number AX80051. Axial’s dig system allows you to lock the rear wheels, while powering the front wheels only for a tighter turning radius. Shift servo sold separately.

Next option part installed is Axial’s black 1.9 beadlock wheels. Beadlock wheels allow users to tune foam set-ups and change tires at will for varying terrain and conditions. We also added our 1.9 internal weight rings, part number AX30547, for some added weight up front which will help us on steep vertical climbs. You can adjust how much weight is in the front wheels by using our 1.9 wheel weight inserts, part number AX30548.

For tires we went with our 1.9 Maxxis Trepador, part number AX12019. These tires are fully licensed by Maxxis and are molded in Axial’s sticky R35 compound for the ultimate traction in any conditions.

Complete SCX10™ option parts list:
AX8087 – 1.9 Black Eight Hole Beadlock Wheels (x3 to have spare tire)
AX8088 – 1.9 Chrome Eight Hole Beadlock Wheel (x3 to have spare tire)
AX08138 – 1.9 Black Walker Evans Wheels (x3 to have spare tire)
AX12019 – 1.9 Maxxis Trepador Tires R35 Compound (x3 to have spare tire)
AX12016 – 1.9 Ripsaw Tire R35 Compound (x3 to have spare tire)
AX30547 – 1.9 Internal Weight Rings (x2)
AX30548 – 1.9 Wheel Weight Inserts (x3)
AX30549 – SCX10™ Aluminum Link Set (11.4″ wheelbase – Dingo)
AX30550 – SCX10™ Aluminum Link Set (12.3″ wheelbase – Honcho and Jeep)
AX30426 – SCX10™ Aluminum Steering Kit
AX30464 – SCX10™ Universal Axle Set
AX30395 – HD Ring and Pinion Gear Sets (stock gear ratio) (x2)
AX30401 – Overdrive HD Ring and Pinion Gear Sets (x2)
AX30402 – Underdrive HD Ring and Pinion Gear Sets (x2)
AX30786 – Aluminum WB8 Driveshaft Retainer Rings (x2)
AX30571 – 13t Steel Pinion Gear
AX30569 – 14t Steel Pinion Gear
AX30573 – 15t Steel Pinion Gear
AX30665 – 80t Spur Gear
AX30860 – HD Motor Plate
AX30834 – 23t HD Servo Horn
AX30835 – 24t HD Servo Horn
AX30836 – 25t HD Servo Horn
AX30494 – Aluminum Axle Lockouts
AX30495 – Aluminum Axle C-hub’s
AX30496 – Aluminum Knuckles
AX30103 – Icon Aluminum Shocks (x2)
AX30132 – Machined Shock Piston 7mm – 1.5×3 (4pcs)
AX24260 – AE-3 Vanguard ESC
AX24010 – Vanguard 2900KV Brushless Motor
AX24007 – 55 Turn Motor
AX24003 – 20 Turn Motor
AX24256 – 5 LED Light String
AX24257 – Simple LED Kit
AX24251 – NVS Light System
AX80045 – Light Bucket Set (x2)
AX80049 – LED Lens Set – Yellow / Clear (4pcs)
AX30793 – Dig Component Set
AX80051 – Dig Transmission Case
AX04033 – Clear Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon Body (Body only)
AX04035 – Complete Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon Body Kit
AX30200 – Red Springs 3.6 lbs/in (short) (x2)
AX30201 – White Springs 4.32 lbs/in (short) (x2)
AX30202 – Green Springs 5.44 lbs/in (short) (x2)
AX30203 – Yellow Springs 6.53 lbs/in (short) (x2)
AX30204 – Blue Springs 7.95 lbs/in (short) (x2)
AX30205 – Red Springs 2.7 lbs/in (long) (x2)
AX30206 – White Springs 3.6 lbs/in (long) (x2)
AX30207 – Green Springs 4.08 lbs/in (long) (x2)
AX30208 – Yellow Springs 5.44 lbs/in (long) (x2)
AX30209 – Blue Springs 6.81 lbs/in (long) (x2)

Axial Talks with Jeep Design and Executive Staff

If you are into wheeling, Moab’s Easter Jeep Safari aka EJS, is one of those events that you have to go to once in your life. This patch of earth has one of the most spectacular landscapes you will ever lay your eyes on. At some point in time, someone decided to take a Jeep out and explore. Thankfully what they saw, they shared, and to this day, driving Jeeps over this ocean of slick rock is the best way to see the beautiful natural surroundings of Moab, Utah. Sure, there are some national park icons to go and see, but the real beauty happens 15 miles from pavement in a group surrounded by your friends in their Jeeps.

Axial had the pleasure of linking up with the Jeep team at EJS 2013 and sat down with Mark Allen and Ray Durham. We asked them for their opinions on the Axial SCX10 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon vehicles. Check it out!

Mark Allen

Ray Durham

Stay tuned as Axial continues to strive to bring you some great info and provide your source of fun, anytime, anywhere!

Full Option RTR Wraith

Axial offers several optional upgrade parts for the Wraith RTR and Kit. Here’s a quick run down of what is installed and why you may want to use these items.

A shot of the completed Wraith in the studio, Axial offers clear body panels for the Wraith, part number AX04027, to give your rock racer a custom look.

In this shot you can see a handful of upgrades. The first upgrade is aluminum shocks, part number AX30092. Aluminum shocks provide better dampening than the stock plastic shocks, especially when mated with our polyoxymethylene  – (POM/thermoplastic) shock pistons. The aluminum shock body and cap have less flex than plastic versions. Aluminum shock bodies also dissipate heat better than the stock plastic bodies. The shock shafts are oversized (3.5mm) for rigidity. They’re great for high power applications and long run times! We also offer a complete line of various springs to fine tune your suspension as needed – see the complete parts list below for more info.

Another parts upgrade is the front sway bar, part number AX30781. Designed for high speed this system will let you soften up your suspension for jumps, while keeping torque twist and body lean to a minimum during acceleration. A sway bar’s main function is to control body roll, yet still allow your shocks to move vertically with the changing terrain. What does all this mean? It means more stability at high speed. A must have upgrade for any would-be rock racer. Installing sway bars does limit articulation, so this is an option best suited for high speed applications. Great for use with our Vanguard brushless system, part number AX24010 and AX24260.

Moving on to the next part we installed a 25T aluminum servo horn, part number AX30836. Axial’s HD aluminum servo horn provides more responsive steering with less chance of stripping the internal splines over the stock plastic servo horn. Clamping style head for secure mounting in high stress applications. Available in 23, 24 and 25 tooth spline counts.

Axial’s next option part install is the Universal Light Bar, part number AX30709. Axial’s light bar is a great way to add realism and working lights to your Wraith with this universal light bar. Another option part that we plan to install is Axial’s NVS Light System, part number AX24251. The ultimate level in detail you can now add the NVS light system which features controls for headlights, tail lights, brake lights, and right / left turn signals, as well as some extra auxiliary lighting. Great for those night time expeditions. We also offer a 5 string LED light set, part number AX24256, to fit this light bar and it is compatible with Axial’s simple LED kit, part number AX24257, and our NVS System.

Another great upgrade is the Wraith Stage One link kit, part number AX30797. Add even more durability to your Wraith by upgrading your stock plastic RTR suspension links with our HD Stage 1 Aluminum Link Kit. Replaces all the stock plastic suspension links with high quality 7mm diameter aluminum links. These links eliminate axle wrap and unwanted axle steer, especially in high power applications. Axial also offers machined heavy duty aluminum straight links, part number AX30790, to replace the stock plastic lower links as an alternative the the Stage One link kit.

Axial’s HD motor plate, part number AX30860. Our heavy duty motor plate is for any vehicle running our AX10 transmission. CNC machined from 4.5mm thick billet aluminum, with integrated heatsink fins to help motors run cooler on those all day expeditions. A must have for any R/C overland adventurist! Axial also offers 13T, 14T and 15T steel pinion gears and an 87T spur gear to give end users an array of gear ratios to choose from. Add more torque for low speed crawling to your Wraith by installing one of Axial’s optional brushed motors available in 27T and 55T configurations. Another option part that we installed here is Axial’s dig system for the Wraith transmission, part number AX30793. Axial’s dig system allows you to lock the rear wheels, while powering the front wheels only for a tighter turning radius. Shift servo sold separately.

Axial’s HD differential covers, part number AX30829. HD diff covers protect ring and pinion gears from being damaged by rocks, just like their 1:1 counterparts, all while adding a little bling to your ride.

Another option part that is usually hiding behind the HD cover is Axial’s HD ring and pinion gears, part number AX30395. HD ring and pinion gears are more efficient than the stock aluminum ring and pinions. CNC machined for precision, hardened steel for durability – great for high power applications. Axial also offers hardened steel overdrive ring and pinion gear sets, part number AX30401, for a little extra wheel speed. We also offer an underdrive ring and pinion gear set, part number AX30402, for a little more torque in binds.

Axial’s HD lower link mounts are another noteworthy upgrade, part number AX30830. Our HD lower link mounts allow users to fine tune ride height and wheelbase by providing more adjustment holes than the stock plastic units.

This shot also shows a few options parts. First option is aluminum knuckles, part number AX30760. Aluminum knuckles provide more responsive steering and helps vehicle track better at speeds and in the rocks. Another option shown is the Axial Aluminum C-hubs, part number AX30762. Aluminum C-hubs also help your vehicle track more consistently in all situations, especailly when used in conjunction with our aluminum knuckles. Also notice the AR60 universal axles, part number AX30780. Axial universal joint axles increase steering angle to 50 degrees, that’s 60% over the stock dogbone/drive cup setup. These universals provide smoother action for a higher performing, efficient drivetrain. The universal is oversized; typical for 1/8 scale vehicles and made of hardened steel so it’s capable of handling extreme power.

Next option is the rear sway bar, part number AX30782. Designed for high speed this system will let you soften up your suspension for jumps, while keeping torque twist and body lean to a minimum during acceleration. A sway bar’s main function is to control body roll, yet still allow your shocks to move vertically with the changing terrain. What does all this mean? It means more stability at high speed. A must have upgrade for any would be rock racer. Installing sway bars does limit articulation, so this is an option best suited for high speed applications. Great for use with our Vanguard brushless system, part number AX24010 and AX24260.

Aluminum axle lockouts are another great upgrade, part number AX30789. Axial’s aluminum axle lockouts are more rigid than the stock plastic lockouts, which will allow the vehicle to track better in all situations.

For wheels, we went with our VWS beadlocks, part number AX08061. VWS wheels allow users to tune foam set-ups and change tires at will for varying terrain and conditions. Another wheel option offered by Axial is our black 8 hole beadlock wheels, part number AX8097. These wheels offer a little wider overall stance which equals stability at high speeds. For low speed rock crawling you can increase your Wraith’s climbing abilities by adding Axial’s 2.2 Internal Weight Rings, part number AX30545. Add even more weight by utilizing Axial’s 2.2 Internal Wheel Weights for the Internal Wheel Weight Rings, part number AX30546.

You can see our R35 Ripsaw tires pictured here, part number AX12015. R35 Ripsaw tires offer both a realistic look for the image-conscious scale crawler and for those looking to up their performance game. This 2.2 Ripsaw offers an aggressive tread design, greater ground clearance, and is made from a R35 sticky compound. The VWS wheels include black aluminum rings, but I swapped those out for our Grey beadlock rings, part number AX08133, just to match the grey colored suspension links.

Complete Wraith option parts list:
AX8097 – 2.2 Black 8 Hole Beadlock Wheels (x2)
AX08061 – 2.2 VWS Beadlock Wheels (x2)
AX08133 – Grey VWS Beadlock Rings (x2)
AX12015 – 2.2 R35 Ripsaw Tires (x2)
AX30545 – 2.2 Internal Wheel Weight Rings (x2)
AX30546 – 2.2 Wheel Weight Inserts (x2)
AX30797 – Stage One Link Kit
AX30790 – Machined Heavy Duty Aluminum Straight Link 101mm (x2)
AX30469 – Machined Heavy Duty Aluminum High Clearance Upper Links (x2)
AX80057 – XR10 Linkage Set (x4 for all 8 links)
AX30395 – HD Ring and Pinion Gear Sets (x2)
AX30401 – Overdrive HD Ring and Pinion Gear Sets (x2)
AX30402 – Underdrive HD Ring and Pinion Gear Sets (x2)
AX30571 – 13t Steel Pinion Gear
AX30569 – 14t Steel Pinion Gear
AX30573 – 15t Steel Pinion Gear
AX30672 – 87t Spur Gear
AX30829 – HD Differential Covers (x2)
AX30860 – HD Motor Plate
AX30830 – HD Link Mounts (x2)
AX30834 – 23t HD Servo Horn
AX30835 – 24t HD Servo Horn
AX30836 – 25t HD Servo Horn
AX30762 – Aluminum Axle C-hub’s
AX30760 – Aluminum Knuckles
AX30789 – Aluminum Axle Lockouts
AX30092 – Aluminum Shocks (x2)
AX30780 – AR60 Universal Axle Set
AX30781 – Front Sway Bar
AX30782 – Rear Sway Bar
AX30709 – Universal Light Bar
AX24256 – 5 LED Light String
AX24257 – Simple LED Kit
AX24251 – NVS Light System
AX24010 – Vanguard Brushless Motor
AX24260 – AE-3 Vanguard ESC
AX24007 – 55 Turn Motor
AX24004 – 27 Turn Motor
AX30793 – Dig Component Set
AX04027 – Wraith Clear Body Panel Kit
AX30223 – Black Springs 1.04 lbs/in (x2)
AX30224 – Purple Springs 1.43 lbs/in (x2)
AX30225 – Orange Springs 1.75 lbs/in (x2)
AX30218 – Red Springs 2.07 lbs/in (x2)
AX30219 – White Springs 2.47 lbs/in (x2)
AX30220 – Green Springs 2.85 lbs/in (x2)
AX30221 – Yellow Springs 3.27 lbs/in (x2)
AX30222 – Blue Springs 3.55 lbs/in (x2)

Axial and Jeep team up for a Demo in Moab at EJS

Axial has been working with Jeep for a few years now. Even though the Jeep product from Axial was released in late 2012, the relationship started much earlier. Through this relationship, Axial has the opportunity to work directly with the Jeep staff on some fun events. One of these events is the anual R/C Jeep Demo in Moab, Utah, during Easter Jeep Safari. Each year, Jeep and Mopar throw a customer appreciation barbeque for their loyal fans. While everyone is checking out the latest Jeep and Mopar concept vehicles, they also have an opportunity to do a little Jeeping, Moab style!

Axial turns the small rock garden in front of Walker True Value Hardware parking lot into a small rock crawling trail paradise. For several hours, anyone at the event is invited to come over and run the trail in the SCX10 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon vehicles. This trail run is made to be just like the real thing, with a trail leader and a group of Jeeps out on the grippy Moab rocks.

The Axial staff started with a basic Rock garden with oversized rocks….

We were talking to a Moab local at the location, and he said we were welcome to come take some rocks from his property to make up the rest of the course, so we headed a few miles out of town, and loaded up the rock to bring back to the venue. SHHH, dont tell the boss we filled the Axial motorhome with slick rock :) Oh, of course we had to do a little indoor crawling while we were at it!

Once back to the venue, we arranged a full course out of the available space, here is the course tested and ready to rock!

The people of Moab were very excited to do a little wheeling in this small space.

The kids loved doing what dad does in his Jeep

Before things got too crazy busy, we were able to get a little footage of the action, check it out……..

As the evening progressed, the crouds got larger and larger

Some locals went home to grab their heavily modified Axial rigs to come run the course, check out this guy’s Hard body JK and his EXO bodied Wraith, very cool!

The night ended with the announcement that Axial and Jeep would be giving away an Axial Jeep Wrangler RTR, so everyone signed up for the raffle hoping to get their hands on one of these fun little Jeeps.

The raffle winner was announced in front of a huge crowd, and the Jeep booth was closed for the night.

Even though the Jeep display closed down, we had a huge group of people who still wanted to run the Jeeps so we stuck around for a few more hours enjoying spending time with Axial enthusiasts, it was an awesome event and we look forward to coming back next year!

Thank you to all of you that made it out to enjoy the event. If you didn’t catch us here, be sure to mark your calendar for next year. The Jeep Mopar bbq happens the Thursday during the Easter Jeep Safari week every year, it is worth the trip to be fed very well and do some scale Jeeping!

Battery Relocation – SCX10 Jeep RTR

We have been getting a few requests recently for a “step by step” tutorial on relocating the battery from its stock location in the rear on the SCX10-JK, to the front. This is a simple modification that can really transform how your rig performs in the rocks. Moving weight from the back to the front of a vehicle greatly enhances its ability to climb steep rock faces. This is a no brainer for me, as I am all about performance with my rigs regardless if they are scale or comp rigs. So let’s dig in!

I am using a “kit” SCX10-JK for this article, but the steps are exactly the same for the kit and RTR Jeeps. A couple shots of the battery tray in stock RTR form.

First thing we need to do is remove the two screws holding the metal battery tray to the chassis.

With the metal tray removed you can access the screws that hold the plastic base of the battery tray.

Remove the two screws that hold the base of the battery tray to the chassis cross-member, located between the rear shock towers.

Next remove the two screws that tie the radio box to the front chassis cross-member.

Locate the bag of plastic extras that is included with the RTR Jeep. Inside there are a few parts required to complete this modification.

Find two of the three battery tray posts in your bag of extras. These will be the main supports for the tray in its new location.

Now grab the parts tree numbered AX80009 from your bag of extras. Cut item #5 off the parts tree. We will use this spacer for the front of the battery tray.

The hardware required for the relocation.

The two main support screws should measure just over an inch.

The front screw needs to be shorter and should measure in the 5/8″ range.

Insert the two long screws in the holes closest to center of the plastic battery tray base, then slide the plastic battery tray posts over the screws.

While holding the spacers on the screws, set the battery base into place so the two long screws line up with the radio box holes. Tighten the screws down until they are snug.

Now grab your short front spacer and set it into place over the front frame cross-member’s molded boss.

Set the metal battery tray into place on the plastic base and install the shorter 5/8″ long screw through the front of the whole assembly.

Install the short flathead screw that holds the metal tray to the plastic base at the rear.

And you are done! A shot of the newly relocated battery tray.

Following these simple steps to move the battery will greatly improve on your SCX10′s already amazing capabilities. Time to go hit the trails!!

Axial – ICON Vehicle Dynamics 61-90mm Aluminum Shocks – Step by Step Build

AX30103 – Icon 61-90mm Aluminum Shock Set – 7mm piston (2pcs)

Now that we have released Axial’s newest scale shocks, which are officially licensed by Icon Vehicle Dynamics, I wanted to take some time to do a step by step build here on the blog to help people get the most out of their new shocks. These shocks are an improvement over our old SCX10 shocks, because of the new fully machined shock piston. The new piston provides a tighter fit inside the shock body which helps eliminate binds as the shock cycles through its travel. The new Icon shock bodies and reservoirs are clear anodized for durability and classic looks, which is a nice touch. Time to dig in and get our hands dirty!

A shot of the packaging. Each package contains all parts and hardware required to build two complete shocks.

I cut all the plastic parts I will need to get started off their respective parts trees.

Open the hardware bags and dump the contents out in a secure location so you don’t loose any vital parts.

Start by locating your aluminum shock bodies and the red o-rings. Apply a little grease to each o-ring before installing them into the shock bodies.

Once you have the o-ring lubed up drop it into place in the bottom of the shock body.

Now locate the plastic spacer that goes in between the o-rings, and install that on top of the first o-ring.

Grease the 2nd o-ring and install it into place on top of the plastic spacer in the shock body.

Next install the lower plastic cartridge and threaded preload adjuster onto the shock body.

Locate your shock shafts and e-clips next.

Install the first e-clip in the bottom slot on the shock shaft.

Slide the shock piston onto the shock shaft next.

Then, install the second e-clip to hold the piston in place.

Both shafts prepped and ready for the next step.

Now we can slide the shock shafts into the shock body from the top. Install the rubber bump stops and thread the rod ends into place as needed.

Apply the Icon decals to the shock reservoirs.

Using the supplied hardware, secure the shock reservoirs to the shock caps.

Insert the black o-rings into the shock cap, and make sure they are properly seated.

Now we will fill the shock body about 3/4 of the way with shock oil and cycle the shock piston to dissipate any and all air bubbles. Make sure the piston stays submersed in the oil while you cycle the shock to get rid of the air bubbles. Once the bubbles are gone fill the shock body until the oil is about 1/16th of an inch from the top of the shock body, so just shy of being full. Once the shock shaft is fully compressed, you should see the oil crown just above the top of the shock body. Screw the cap down tight while holding the shock shaft fully compressed. Once the cap is tight, wipe any excess oil away. Cycle the shock shaft a few times and listen for air bubbles. If you can hear air bubbles gurgling around inside the shock, start over and use a little more oil. Make sure all air bubbles are gone before re-assembling. If the shock shaft won’t compress all the way after this step, you have a little too much oil in the shock body. Remove the shock cap, and re-bleed the shock with a little less oil.

After you are finished bleeding the shock we can install the dual rate springs and spacers as needed.

Slide the springs over the shock body with the plastic spring retainer between the two springs.

Install the lower spring retainer next, and you are done!

That wraps up building Axial’s new fully licensed Icon shocks. Following these tips will help people get the most out of their new SCX10 shocks.

Vanquish – Currie Rock Jock Axle Install – Wraith

As some of you may have seen, I recently wrote an article about swapping stock SCX10 housings out for the aluminum Currie Rock Jock axle housings from Vanquish Products. Vanquish has now taken these axle housings a step further by offering them for the Wraith as well. The assembly on these axles is very similar to the SCX10 version, which is fairly simple. The two biggest differences between the axles is the SCX10 ring and pinion assembly is centered on the axle, and the axle tubes are equal lengths. The Wraith version has the offset ring and pinion assembly with one short axle tube and one long.

I came back from lunch a few days ago to find that the “Vanquish Fairy” had left some parts on my desk for me. One quick look and I knew exactly what was in the package. Time to install some bling on my custom Wroncho build. Let’s get busy!

A shot of the front and rear axles.

I started with the rear axle, here you can see all the parts are sealed in separate bags to prevent damage during shipping.

Once you have your old axles torn down, grab the pinion gear and the two bearings used to support it.

Install a bearing on the pinion shaft and press it into the axle housing by hand.

Now set your ring gear assembly into place.

Use the supplied M3 hardware to secure the bearing caps that hold the ring gear assembly.

Time for the axle tubes. Here you can see the parts and tools required. A set of snap ring pliers are needed for this step.

Insert a 5x11mm bearing into the end of the axle tube, and install the snap ring to hold it in place.

Slide the axle shafts into place next.

Then install the drive pins and hexes.

Completed axle tubes ready for install.

Now insert the long axle tube into the axle housing opposite the ring gear.

Add a dab of blue thread lock to the M3 set screw.

Install the M3 set screw into the axle housing to locate the tube. Then do the same for the short side axle tube.

Now install the axle truss per the instructions to properly time the whole assembly.

Now install your four M3 set screws that secure the axle tubes to the center section. Don’t forget to add a dab of thread lock to these as well.

Now remove the axle truss so you can install the differential cover.

Add a little grease to the ring and pinion gears before installing the diff cover.

This is also a good time to fill the unused holes in the axle tubes with the provided set screws in the axle kit. Add a little thread lock to each one so they stay in place. Make sure you leave the holes needed to secure the axle truss empty as well.

Now install the diff cover using the supplied hardware.

Re-install the axle truss using thread lock per the instructions.

Install the link mounts.

Last but not least, install the differential skid plate.

Now we will move on to the front axle.

Dissect your front axle and set the parts you will reuse aside.

Grab the front axle’s center section and the rest of the parts required to complete this step.

Slide the pinion gear and bearings into the center section.

Drop the ring gear assembly in the housing and install the bearing caps with the supplied hardware.

Locate your axle tubes and the required set screws.

Insert the axle tubes into the housing’s center section and install the M3 set screws to locate the tubes.

Temporarily install the axle truss.

Add a little thread lock to the set screws used to tie the tubes to the center section.

Install the set screws to lock the axle tubes into place.

Remove the axle truss, grease the gears and install the differential cover.

Install the supplied set screws into the unused holes on the axle tubes.

Now you can used thread lock and install the axle truss permanently.

Bolt the link mounts into place on the axle.

Install the plastic skid plate on the axle’s center section.

Slide a 5x11mm bearing into the ends of the axle tubes.

I am using the Vanquish chassis mounted steering kit on this build, so I installed the 3 link mount on the axle tube at this time.

Install the inner axles, c-hubs, knuckles, steering tie rod and you are done.

That wraps up the Vanquish Rock Jock axle swap for the AR60 axles. For those that missed the SCX10 axle housing swap, here is a link to that article.
http://www.axialracing.com/blog_posts/1073902689

Project Wrexo – Bender’s Latest Custom Build

Now that Axial is the official R/C company of Ultra 4 Racing, I figured it was time to build a proper Ultra 4 R/C vehicle. If you are not familiar with Ultra 4 Racing it basically combines low speed “rock crawling” with high speed “baja” style racing. So, your vehicle has to be able to handle technical rock sections and high speed desert bumps in the same race, on the same day. Most hardcore off-road enthusiasts know a solid axle set-up front and rear rules in low speed rock crawling. And most of those same off-road fans know that independent suspension rules for high speed and jumps. There are a few competitors in Ultra 4 Racing that have been mixing the two set-ups together for a suspension system that works decent in both situations. Shannon Campbell was the first to try this, if I am not mistaken, and he has had great success winning the King of the Hammers crown in 2008 and 2011. Shannon’s rig runs independent suspension up front and a solid axle set-up in the rear. This latest custom build has been dubbed “Project Wrexo” and follows suit with that hybrid suspension set-up. Here’s a little sneak peek at this new build, more details and info to come soon so keep an eye on Axial’s blog and Facebook page.