Bender’s AX10 Ridgecrest Stage 1

As some of you may have seen I recently built up a new Axial Ridgecrest dubbed “Project Backyard Basher”. It was built for all around bashing, trail running and a little light duty crawling without adhering to any rules or specifications. I have been having a lot of fun with it in it’s current state. But, I also wanted to build another one up for entry level competitions. These competitions require your rig to fit certain criteria, like having a maximum wheelbase of 12 1/2″ for the 2.2 comp class. I wanted to do this build in a few different stages starting with some very basic mods and eventually evolve that into a hardcore crawler, with durability in mind. While the Ridgecrest is pretty stout right out of the box, I want to take it even further with vital option parts in key areas. Those modifications will come later though. For now, I want to see how capable I make this rig just spending a little time at the workbench. So, let’s get started!

The new Ridgecrest that was recently liberated from it’s box.

First thing I wanted to do was get as much weight over the front axle as possible. To do that I swapped the battery tray and electronics tray around so the battery will be in front. Start be removing the four screws that hold the battery tray in place.

Once all four screws have been removed, pull the battery tray out of the chassis.

A shot of the chassis after removing the battery tray.

Next we will have to remove the electronics tray. Start by unscrewing the top cap on the radio box.

Now remove the last two screws that hold the top half of the radio box in place.

Flip the top half of the radio box up and unplug the ESC and servo. It is important to pay attention when you unplug everything so you know how it goes back together.

Remove the wire routing tab from the motor wires.

Unplug the motor wires.

Then remove the wire routing tab for the on/off switch.

Remove the power switch.

Then remove the 4 screws holding the electronics tray in place, and remove the electronics tray.

An overall shot of the chassis with both trays removed.

Time to re-assemble. Start with the battery tray and bolt it into place out front where the electronics tray was located.

Re-install the electronics tray next. You will notice the servo wire lead is probably too short to plug back into the receiver now. No big deal, you will just need to spend a few bucks for a servo extension wire. This is basically an extension cord for your servo wire. Plug the servo lead into the female end of the extension, plug the other end into your receiver and you are ready to go. Notice I have already plugged everything back into it’s required place. Route the antenna wire out the top half of the radio box, and run the servo and ESC wires in from the top.

Here’s a shot of the servo extension I used.

I also moved the power switch to the opposite side of the chassis from the stock location, just to keep wires neatly routed along the chassis plates. Use the wire routing tab for the on/off switch and the steering servo wire.

The servo extension plugged into the steering servo.

Now install the first two screws that hold the top half of the radio box. Make sure your wires are neatly tucked in and clear of being pinched between the two halves of the box.

Grab the top cap for the radio box and route the antenna wire through the cap from the bottom.

Secure the top cap with the last two screws.

Plug the motor wires back together and secure them to the chassis plate with the wire routing tab.

Another overall shot of the chassis now that the battery tray is out front.

Next thing I wanted to improve upon is the ride height. I wanted to lower the overall stance of this Ridgecrest to help with off camber obstacles. This was also a simple no cost modification because you can flip the lower link mount/lower shock mounts on the axles to lower your ride height a little. First, remove your wheel and tire from the corner of the truck you are working on. Now you can clearly see the lower link/shock mount.

Remove the screws holding the lower link and shock to the axle bracket.

Using a 2.5mm driver, remove the screws that hold the bracket into place on the axle.

Flip the bracket 180 degrees and re-install on the axle.

Re-attach your lower link and shock to the bracket.

In an effort to lower the ride height even more, I moved the upper shock mounts to the inner most hole on the side plates.

Another inexpensive modification I made was going to softer shock springs. I installed our “Black” comp springs which are the softest we make. This will help the suspension conform to the terrain better.

Last thing I am going to do for this installment is cut the stock tires for better forward bite. The stock RTR Ripsaw tires are quite a bit harder than our soft R35 compound Ripsaw tires. So, cutting the stock tires is an inexpensive way to get a little better performance. I went around all 4 tires and cut the smallest row of lugs out using a pair of wire cutters. A shot of the stock Ripsaw tread pattern.

Use the wire cutters to cut the small center row of lugs away from the tire.

Now do the same for the small outer lugs.

A shot of the tire tread after removing the tread blocks.

You can also cut the existing sipes/grooves in the center lugs deeper with a Dremel and cutoff wheel for better off camber performance.

A shot of the finished tire. Another mod you can make to soften the stock tires is to open up the breather holes in the wheels. I used a 1/4″ drill bit and open up the existing holes to help the tires breath better and conform to the rocks.

Here’s how the stance on this rig sits now.

That does it for Stage 1 of this build. These few mods will help the overall crawling capability of a Ridgecrest right out of the box. Stay tuned for Stage 2 which will be coming soon!!

Link – Stage Two Ridgecrest Build
Link – Stage Three Ridgecrest Build

Axialfest 2012 Recap

The first annual Axialfest was held this past weekend, June 22 – 24th, in Cisco Grove, CA. This event was known in the past as the “Axial West Coast Championships”, aka AWCC. This year’s event was geared towards “scale adventure” more so than a full on “competition”. While there are many classes to run, and trophies to win, this year’s event had a little different format to it, by offering numerous scale classes to compete in. Brian Parker’s new competition format known as “G6″ is slowly taking  the country by storm. Parker and his group of Recon Crawlers set out to make this event all about driving your scale R/C truck on lengthy adventures. When I say lengthy adventures, I mean it. For example the first stage of the G6 challenge on Friday consisted of navigating 500 gates that were sporadically laid out in the woods surrounding Cisco Grove Campground, the base camp of our adventures for the weekend. These 500 gates are numbered and must be run in consecutive order. Sounds simple enough right? Well, it can be, if you can locate all the gates. Brain and his crew can be pretty creative when it comes to setting courses, and camouflaging gates. And keep in mind there are 3 stages to this G6 challenge, so 500 gates is only part of the 3 day adventure. In the end I believe some adventurists in attendance ran in excess of 1200 gates throughout the weekend. Here’s a run down from the event.

Axial base camp.

The mud pit, which would be used throughout the weekend.

 

Registration on Friday morning.

 

The Terra Cross track.

 

Competitors line up according to class for the start.

 

Brian Parker holds the driver’s meeting before releasing competitors out onto the course.

 

On to the action. A cool Crawlmaro replica made with a Wraith.

 

Brett Carlson from Bulu Productions made the trip down from Oregon to shoot a little video, as well as compete with his Wraith.

 

Driving out of a rollover will save time and penalty points if you don’t have a winch.

 

One of the challenges that had to be performed on this stage was a sled pull.

 

Here you can see the mud depth is keep scale for realism.

 

Teamwork is another key factor to making through all 500 gates. Competitors are allowed to help each other over obstacles if need be.

 

The start of day two’s Ultra Race. This was a class that required you to run the set course as fast as you can. If you are looking for a good fun cardio workout, this is the class for you.

 

The first turn was a bottle neck for the more densely populated classes.

 

Axial’s own Brandon Coonce took the holshot in his custom blue paneled Wraith.

 

Next class hits the ground running. This was the adventurist class if I remember right. This class wasn’t about speed, it was more about adventure. But, a quick start to get ahead of the competition is still a good idea until the group gets spread out on course.

 

Turn one mayhem.

 

Next class to depart for the starting area.

 

Turn one was a great vantage point again.

 

Ty Campbell from Tekin’s custom Wraith build hits the mud pit flying.

 

More turn one action.

 

Not very often you see a Gremlin sporting 54″ tires.

 

After all the classes got underway, I set out on foot with my camera to see what challenges lay ahead for our competitors. First driver I came across was my co-worker Brandon. He had a weird monstrosity strapped to the hood of his Wraith. I asked him as he went by what it was, and all I heard was something about a boat? Confused, I followed him up the trail for a bit until he hit a challenge section of the trail run. This challenge required those carrying kayaks or boats on their vehicles to launch their boats at the designated boat ramp, let the vessel float its way downstream to the designated pick-up zone, then recover your boat and load it back onto your rig before you continue on. Actually turned out to be very entertaining to watch, some boats sank in the “rapids” requiring the owner to tip toe their way out into the stream for a recovery. Here is where Brandon’s previously mentioned monstrosity/camp fabbed raft came into play. Constructed of a 2.2 Ripsaw tire, stock tire foam, Proline roof rack, Proline cooler and a little duct tape, this raft floated down the scale river like a champ!! Everyone was laughing as it floated by us.

 

A few other watercraft making their way downstream.

 

After completing a few hundred gates the trail leads the competitors back to base camp for a run through the mud pit.

 

Cupid’s set-up is looking pretty high-tech these days, he is now apparently sporting a compound bow!!

 

Meanwhile back at our campsite our XR10′s are still covered in shaving cream from the previous night’s “Rock Riot” event. It’s a long story………. click the link below the photo.

A little video of Brandon and I hitting the shaving cream pit first. Brandon had the honors of breaking trail, I am second. Listen to Parker laughing as we go through.

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=474854405861643

 

Our guard dog watched over the Axial RV while we were away.

 

One of my favorite scale vehicles from the weekend.

 

A few random campsites that were set-up properly for the disco themed weekend.

 

Time for some Terra Cross action. The TC races had a little something for everyone. There were classes for the SCX10, Wraith and EXO. Each class had its own variation of the track to run. This was one of the highlights of the weekend for me. It was the definition of backyard racing!!

First up for the heat races were the SCX10s.

 

Next up, the Wraith class.

 

And the EXO heat races were last.

 

Winner of the SCX10 Terra Cross Race was Matt Soileau

 

Start of the Wraith finals.

 

Taking the first Wraith Terra Cross victory was Axial team driver Ryan Gerrish.

 

Start of the EXO finals

 

Steve Brown of Vanquish Products tries to get his RTR EXO out of Ty Campbell’s way. Ty was by far the fastest guy on the track.

 

After all the dust settled, Ty Campbell took the win in the EXO Terra Cross.

 

Congrats to all the winners, you guys earned it! Here are a few highlights from the awards ceremony.

 

The future of our sport.

 

The Hawaii club sent this autographed banner to the event with signatures from the Hawaii G6 thanking Axial for their support. Thanks guys!!

That wraps up the 2012 Axialfestivies. If you can find a way to attend one of these G6 events you won’t be disappointed, especially if you own a scale R/C truck. Don’t forget to pack spare batteries either, because you are going to need them.

AX10 Ridgecrest – Stage 1 Upgrades

With the release of the AX10 Ridgecrest, there’s been some chatter about it’s capabilities as a crawler.  Is it staying true to the AX10 name?  Well as part of the Axial design team, I can tell you we worked hard to insure this.  Though out of the box the Ridgecrest may have a bit more speed than a traditional crawler, wider axles and some exterior scale details, following in the tracks of it’s rock racer big brother the Wraith, with a few simple mods, the Ridgecrest can easily be a strong rock crawler.

Here’s the AX10 Ridgecrest as it sits out of the box.

First things first, let’s get the body off and move that battery to the front.  The battery tray is held in place with 4 M3 cap head screws and it’s the same with the electronics tray.

Simply remove all 8 screws and the trays are free.  You’ll have to open the radio box and unplug the steering servo as the servo wire is not quite long enough to reach the radio box when it’s installed in the rear position of the chassis.

At this point you can install the battery tray up front and the electronics in the rear of the chassis.  As for your servo wire you can purchase a servo wire extender for just a few dollars, or I had a junk servo, stole the wire and soldered the wires together to extend mine.

Next, lets get some weight in those wheels.  Using Axial parts I got some interior wheel weight rings, weight inserts, 2.2 beadlock wheels and Ripsaw 2.2 tires in R35 compound.

AX30545 – 2.2 Internal Wheel Weight Ring (2)

AX30546 – 2.2 Internal Wheel Weight Inserts 21g/0.75lbs (2)

AX12015 – 2.2 Ripsaw Tires R35 Compound (2)

AX8061 – Axial 2.2 VWS Beadlock Wheels Set (Black) (2)

I added just three weights to each ring for the front wheels.  Using all 6 weights would have made the wheels too heavy.  We need just enough weight for good traction and stability.

Each front wheel ended up weighing 13.05oz, as compared to a stock wheel weighing only 5.57oz.

Next it was time to work on the shocks and lower the center of gravity.  A simple trick on AR60 OCP axles is to flip the link/shock mount to lower the chassis. Some additional tech.

Utilizing the stock shocks, I disassembled and added aluminum bodies, aluminum caps, Delrin machined pistons and super soft springs.  When reassembling I used 30wt shock oil.

AX30111 – Aluminum Shock Caps (2)

AX30120 – Aluminum Shock Body 12×47.5mm (2)

AX30438 – 10mm Machined Piston – 1.2 (1)

AX30223 – Spring 14x70mm 1.04lbs/in – Black (2)

When installing the shocks, I used the upper mounting hole that lays the shocks back more, inward towards the center of the chassis.

Back together with just a few hours of work and here’s the modified chassis layout.

And here’s the fruits of our labor.  The Ridgecrest looks mean.  Time to take it out for some quick testing to see the dramatic improvement in crawling capability.

The front is planted.  Traction and grab of the front tires is greatly improved and I can get the front way up, with less chance of roll over.  Articulation is great and the suspension articulates smoothly with the new shock parts.  This is only Stage 1.  Next time we’ll add aluminum links, create some more tire clearance and really get this thing crawling.

 

2011 Axial/MSD Scale Nationals: Top Truck Challenge

The Top Truck Challenge was the last event of the 2011 Scale Nats weekend. To get into this competition you had to be voted in by members of RCCrawler.com. Anyone can submit an entry, but only the top 10 make the cut. This event is held on Sunday every year, and is the most entertaining to witness by far. It’s just fun watching custom built R/C’s go through this grueling torture test. The was no shortage of breakage, or fried electronics this year either. Almost every competitor had to make repairs at some point during the event. Driver’s meeting started at 10am on Sunday, so we all got to sleep in a little. Once the meeting was done everyone headed down to the first obstacle, “The Frame Twister”. Here’s a quick rundown of the day.

Driver’s ask questions about the format before the event gets underway.
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Frame Twister
Team Axial driver Zach Chatelain’s custom Jeep tuber.
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Utah’s Lance Parker and his custom Jeep Brute build.
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More random shots from the first obstacle.
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Colorado’s Patrick Hardesty working his way through.
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Mud Pit
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Ryan Gerrish won the award for “Biggest Splash” in this event.
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Ty Giebel got a little too close to the pit during Ryan’s pass.
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More random shots
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Obstacle Course
Tim Samuel navigates his custom tuber through the course.
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The finish line had a decent jump before it, most guys hit the skinny pedal as they came through.
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A little carnage.
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More random goodness.
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More at the finish line.
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Dean Hsiao on course.
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Sled Pull
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Mini Rubicon
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It didn’t take the kids long to inherit the pull sled for their Honchos.
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Hill Climb
Ryan Gerrish works his way up the hill climb obstacle.
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John Riplinger’s custom Jeep tuber attacking the hill.
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Few more shots from the hill.
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Tank Trap
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And the winners are………
1st John Riplinger
2nd Lance Parker
3rd Ryan Overbye
4th Zach Chatelain
5th Dean Hsiao
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That’s pretty much it for the 2011 Scale Nationals. It was a great weekend, with some awesome competition. We are already looking forward to next year.

2011 Axial/MSD Scale Nationals: Class 1 and 3

Axial teamed up again this year with Montana Scale Designs (MSD) to be the title sponsor of the 2011 MSD Scale Nationals in Helena, Montana. For those that may be new to the “Scale Nationals”, it is basically a hardcore competition for scale R/C rock crawling vehicles. Unlike the standard 2.2 competitions, these rigs are built to be as realistic as possible. Guys spent countless hours building these custom one off trucks, then show up in Montana to compete with some of the best builders/drivers in the country. These trucks are then put through a 3 day torture test to see which driver and vehicle can prevail/survive the weekend.

The setting for this years event was similar to last year, but with more water obstacles mixed in. If you have never attended the scale nationals, building waterproof vehicles is a must. Every year there is usually a fair share of water and mud to negotiate out on course, which is half the fun. This year was no different, there were many natural “scale” waterfalls integrated into the comp courses. Weather forecast for the weekend was rain too, so that just added to the mud and water levels.

The weekend started off for me and my companions at 6am sharp Friday morning when we met in the parking lot of our hotel, showered and ready to roll. From there we grabbed some coffee and supplies for the day, then hit the road for the short 15 minute drive to the comp site. We pulled into the comp site as rain and drizzle fell from the sky. Dark gray clouds assured us it would be a wet one, but the temps were warmer then expected which was nice. On Friday we ran 2 classes, the class one vehicles (aka the Street Class) and the class 3 vehicles (aka the Modified Class). For more info on the different classes and rules check out the scale rules thread on RCC. Here’s a rundown of the competition from Friday.

Competitors wait in line to have their trucks inspected to make sure they meet the rules.
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One of the endless custom builds at scale nats this year.
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Driver’s meeting
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Event organizer Ben Palmer goes over the itinerary for the day.
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A few course shots, there were a handful of bridges set-up for drivers to negotiate as well.
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Bulu production’s Brett Carlson was on hand shooting video all weekend. Brett produced a full blown DVD of the event last year for sale to the public, which was awesome. Brett will also be doing a DVD of this year’s event as well.
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Here’s a short teaser video that Brett edited together from this year’s event.

Axial team driver Dean Hsiao from northern California winching his custom class 3 rig up a slippery rock face.
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Minnesota’s Ryan Overbye getting ready to start his first course of the day. Ryan was one of many that ran all 5 classes this year.
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Andy Brooks made the trip out from Ohio with several cool custom rigs. Here’s his custom “Hack-a-lac” build in action.
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This off-camber rock face was extremely slippery. Many competitors ended up sliding into one of the gates, if they didn’t fall off the rock, because of the total lack of traction. Ripsaw tires excelled here, Andy walked through this set of gates with zero drama.
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Class one rigs awaiting their turn on the courses.
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Class one Hummer doing work.
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Once the day was done and all the scores turned in, everyone headed over to Ben Palmer’s shop for awards and some general mischief.
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Ben starts the award announcements.
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The Class one winners
Congrats to Team Axial Driver Patrick Norton from Texas for winning Class one. Also would like to thank team driver Zach Chatelain as well, for his 5th place finish. Great job guys!
1. Patrick Norton
2. Luis Muzquiz
3. Jerry Norton
4. Lance Parker
5. Zach Chatelain
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The Class three winners
1. Luis Muzquiz
2. Lance Parker
3. John Ripplinger (Chad Hand pictured)
4. Devlin Shipley
5. Larry Lawther
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That pretty much covers day one. Keep an eye for the next installment, Class 2 and the Axial Spec Class. Followed up by the Top Truck Challenge coverage. Who is ready rumble, and get really muddy?!?

2011 MSD Scale Nationals Spec Class Details

Axial is back again for the 2011 MSD Scale Nats as the title sponsor. This year’s dates are May 20th-22nd 2011.

We are very excited to be a part of this event again, and look forward to being there with our core customers. Last year we tried something a little different by doing a “spec class”. Basically, we donated five RTR Honchos. Four of those trucks were assigned to courses, and those trucks stayed at those courses all day. If you entered the spec class, you had to run the rig that was at each course in bone stock form. This class ended up being one of the most talked about classes all weekend, as it turned into a driver’s class, since no one rig had an advantage over the other. To top it all off, Axial gave the spec class vehicles to the top five drivers in that class when the event was over. So not only did drivers get to treat these rigs like a rental vehicle, they had a shot at keeping one if they placed in the top five.

Well, we are coming back to Montana this year to do the spec class again. Only this year there will be a Wraith on one course, a 2.2 Honcho on another course, a standard 1.9 RTR Honcho on another course and a stock Dingo for the last course. So, instead of driving 4 vehicles that are exactly the same, drivers will have to drive a totally different rig on each of the 4 courses. Should make for an interesting event to say the least, and we can’t wait to see how it all unfolds. Plus, this will be the first time the general public gets a chance to drive a Wraith before they are even available in hobby shops.

So, without any more delay, here is your 2011 spec class line-up. We may have one more twist to add to this as well, but we will keep that a secret until it’s showtime!

Here’s the little “twist” we were talking about last week. All spec class competitors will be required to tow a trailer through the courses with the spec class Dingo. A huge thanks to www.ajsmachine.com for donating this sick trailer to us for use in the spec class this year. I think it will be a great new twist for this class.

Axial SCX10 Dingo with AJS Machine Adventure Trailer for MSD Scale Nationals

Interested in attending? Here’s a link to the MSD Scale Nationals Forum on RCC with all the event info.
http://www.rccrawler.com/forum/forumdisplay.php?f=145

If you pull into town and are needing any last minute parts, be sure to swing by The Hobby Garage. Ben and Aaron always have a full stock of parts on hand.

The Hobby Garage
2611 North Montana Ave
Helena, MT
(406) 422-1222

Wraith Ready-to-Run 1/10th Electric 4WD Rock Racer

Axial Wraith on the cover of RC Car Action Magazine Cover Date: June 2011
We just got these in the mail! The June issue of RC Car Action magazine has the Axial Wraith on the cover and reviewed by RCCA’s Editor-in-chief, Matt Higgins. Also to check out in this issue is the Axial SCX10 Honcho Competition-Ready Scale Crawler article written by Matt Higgins and the Axial SCX10 based project in the RockPile department written by Kevin Jowett.
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Axial Wraith™ Ready-to-Run 1/10th Electric 4WD Rock Racer The Wraith™ Ready-to-Run 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD Rock Racer is another “FIRST” for Axial with the first and most realistic full tube-frame chassis design that is manufactured with high strength composite materials. The Wraith™ is built to go fast and is NOT JUST A LOW SPEED ROCK CRAWLER. The Axial Wraith™ changes the game with its impressive 1:1 scale looks, high-speed monster truck “bashability,” and technical “crawl” capabilities. The Wraith™ is the most versatile vehicle satisfying the needs of a wide range of enthusiasts! The realistic looks, drivability and ready-to-run ease make this vehicle the perfect blank canvas for the enthusiast looking for a vehicle to build upon. The Wraith™ can go in so many directions; desert sand, mountain trail runner, rock racer, mud bogger and any form of backyard bashing that can be dreamed up!

Within the 1:1 [full size] crawl & off-road race segments, overall tire diameters have been on the rise, literally and directly influencing the R/C crawl segment, thus this Axial Ripsaw reflects this attraction of flirting with rocks at speed with a compelling design that will give your rig the aggressive competition look and performance. R/C crawlers will clearly benefit with larger ground clearance where it counts as the Ripsaw measures 5.5″ [140mm] in diameter. This gives the lowest point on the 4X4 axle housing more clearance thus giving you many more tactical driving options in those sticky predicaments! Speaking of “sticky,” Axial offers the 2.2 Ripsaw in a R35 sticky rubber compound noted with a “white dot” on the outside carcass of the tire.

Axial Wraith Press Page

Axial Wraith Public Page

Axial Wraith YouTube Video

AXIAL Wraith Dark Tone

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Axial Wraith Sneak Peek Video

What started as a fresh start with a clean slate for the Axial Research and Development team, has only lived in spirit in the eyes of the public until recent, resulting in vague images of uncertainty. The Wraith, while it has been nothing more than ghosts of whispers, is about to enter the scene and bring a new dimension of excitement.

While you were sleeping the Axial team has been working feverishly to capture the spirit of the Wraith.

New Axial Ripsaw Tires Now Shipping

That’s right! Axial’s new 2.2 scale tire is now available through Axial distributors. The Ripsaw tires (#AX12015) feature a super sticky R35 compound, molded ribbing between the lugs to help keep mud and snow from packing into the tire tread, recessed lugs for additional traction and measure 5.5″ tall. Finish off your next 2.2 scale build with a tire that’s as aggressive as the terrain you drive on.

http://www.axialracing.com/products/ax12015

Video:

Fitting 2.2 Ripsaw tires on your SCX10

Ever since we posted the sneak peek video of our new 2.2 Ripsaw tires, we’ve been getting a lot of questions on fitting 2.2 tires onto our SCX10 line of trucks. Bolting the 2.2 tires and wheels up to the truck isn’t all that difficult, but you will have issues with tires rubbing the bumpers and body. A little trim job to the bumpers and body will fix that though, and give your scale truck a little more aggressive look. For this article I am going to use our RTR SCX10 Honcho. I chose the Honcho because it has a little longer wheelbase then the Dingo TR, which will fit the 2.2 tires and wheels better. The Honcho will be the easiest to modify too, because you will only have to modify the front bumper and body.

Here’s how the Honcho looked before I got started:
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Here’s a few side by side pictures of the two tires:
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Here you can see this same Honcho with the 2.2 Ripsaw tires and wheels mounted, before I started cutting:
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Here are a few more photos highlighting the problem areas. Notice the 2.2 tire hitting the body and front bumper way before the suspension bottoms out:
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First thing we are going to do is remove the front bumper and cut it back so the tires clear it as the suspension cycles. Start by removing the center skid plate from the front bumper:
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Now remove the lights from the front bumper, and pull it off your truck:
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After removing the bumper, take the remaining 2 skid plates out of the bumper as well. Here you can see that I will cut along the edge of the bumper in the area highlighted by my hex driver:
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After I cut the wings off I used an X-acto knife to smooth everything out:
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Reinstall the bumper, lights and center skid:
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Here you can see the tires clear the bumper with ease now, even when the suspension cycles:
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Now, with the body on the chassis, we can check to see how much cutting it’ll take to clear the tires:
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Next, I laid the cut line out on the body with a black marker, so it’s easier to visualize the final cut:
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Cut the body a little less then you think you’ll need, and recheck to see if anything is still rubbing:
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Here you can see the tire is still hitting the body just a little:
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This is how it will looks after the final trim is done:
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Now repeat the last few steps for the other side of the body:
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And you’re done and ready for fun!
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Overall stance after being chopped:
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While this Honcho may not look as scale as it used to, the capabilities gained will far outweigh the slight loss in scale appearance.