How Car Transmissions & Synchromesh Work

WP_How_Transmission_Works_600x264

 

Chances are that at some point you found yourself scratching that head of yours¬†attempting to figure out how a manual transmission and synchromesh gears work. Dating all the way back to 1936, Chevrolet developed a movie called “Spinning Gears” that explains just how everything works. Pop some popcorn, kickback and learn.

On another note, this video was produced back in 1936. Meaning all of those graphics and editing were done by hand, as in no computers were used. That’s super cool.

 

Video LINK: https://youtu.be/aFvj6RQOLtM

Oliver Knives How-To Build for AWCC 2011 Prizes

From Dwane Oliver of Oliver Knives

I get this particular knife cut out at a water jet place back east. It saves me about 1.5 hrs. This is the only one I do this with. The rest of my knives I cut from barstock. When I get them I aneal them , put them in the oven at about 1400 deg F , let em get up to temp and then just shut the oven off and let them cool real slow. This makes them dead soft.

Then I flatten the edge so I can mark it with a sharpie and mark the grinds. This is the tool I use for that.


Then I get my sander set up to do a flad grind. I built this sander from scratch , it’s built just like the ones you can buy , but mine has a 2hp DC variable speed motor, and I built a vertical 5/8″ shaft on the other end. I can put several different tools on it.

I built a small work rest to do flat grinds on , it helps to hold the blade still.


The belt direction is down , I always grind into the edge , never away.

Here is one that has been ground next to one that hasn’t.

I start on a 60 grit belt then go to a 120 grit and then 220 grit before heat treat.

Here they are , ready for the oven to be heat treated.

My digitally controlled oven , it will go up to 2200 deg I think.
1095 High Carbon steel heat treats at 1550 , I take them to 1600.

They are in there , wow that’s hot.

When I take them out of the oven I dunk them in the quenching oil , that cools them off very fast. As long as your grinds are even you don’t hear a pop when you drop them in. If you do ……its cracked and now scrap iron. lol , its has happened to me before, not in about 5 years though 8)

After they cool off to about 200 deg , I put them in the toaster oven at about 325 deg for 2 hours.


Here they are after the heat treatment , that’s the oil burned on the blade.

I then go back to the grinder on a 120 belt , 220 , 320 , 400 then a burishing 3M belt. Makes a great brushed finish. Here they are after that…..I had some others at the same stage and just shot them all.

While the blades were in the oven I made the handle material. I buy the G10 ( fiberglass composite ) in different thickness and colors and then laminate them together. Not all of the choices , just custom ones like this.
I sand each side with a 30 grit block and then use Devcon 5 min epoxy to hold em together. I put it in my 20 ton press and squeeze the chit outa it.


Cut up and ready to put on the blades.

Here they are again , with handles on them , epoxy drying , it dont take long before I can start shaping them. I also put 4 brass pins all the way through the handle. this helps with latteral strains.



Sanding and shaping is done on the belt grinder , I have a .500″ wheel that works great for the finger groove. I use a Hook-it II system( 6″ disks with hook and loop straps on them , real fast to change grits ) mounted on the vertical shaft to finish sand handles on. Missed a pic of that.

Now its time to make the Kydex sheaths. Kydex is a heat moldable ABS based plastic , its super tough stuff , and really cool to work with. If you mess up a mold , you just put it back in the oven and try again.

Here is my home made Press , it just has 2″ of a real dense foam on the bottom and then 1″ on the top.

Here is the first one ready for pressing. I tape the chit outa the blade to give it some room inside the sheath , the square on the handle is for the loop to attach to. The Kydex I decided to use has a silver carbon fiber look to it , i think it looks cool. It goes in the oven at 325 deg F hard as hell and comes out soft as dough.

Its pretty simple , put a piece of sheet down , the knife on that and another sheet on top and press…..2 min later and take it out and here it is.


I have a system of holes for these sheaths that will accept 2 different kinds of attachment , there is a rhyme and reason for the layout. It can be worn right or left handed , cross draw or upside down. Pretty cool I think. The rivets closest to the handle are critical in placement. They are the ones that dictate how tight the knife fits the sheath.

Drill a 1/4″ hole and put a rivet in it and press it in the arbor press.

I make my own stencils for marking my name on my blades too. I use this light sensitive material , its like a silkscreen. You put the negative on the glass and then put the stencil material on top. Close the lid , turn on the light , wait 2.5 min and turn the light off. Take it out , peel a clear film off each side and put it in the developer for about a min…..done.



Then I just tape the stencil on the blade and etch it on there , comes out cool most of the time. These came out pretty good.

AND here they are. As Parker would say…Those drivers that Do Work , will reap the rewards. The winner of each class will get a hand made knife.
Here are the two for the 2.2 pro and Sportsman classes.


And a special one for the winner of the G6 scale competition.
It has Moon Glow in the center of the handle , man its some bright stuff and glows for hours. The lanyard has glow string in it as well. It is also equipped with a whistle and a Black Crater cord light flashlight. Of course all of the knives have a ferrocerium fire steel in the handle as well.






Well I hope you enjoyed my little how to here.
I wish I was going to AWCC , but it just ain’t meant to be I guess. There will be a little bit of my sweat there though , these were fun to make.

Oliver Knives – Official Sponsor of the AWCC 2011

Fitting 2.2 Ripsaw tires on your SCX10

Ever since we posted the sneak peek video of our new 2.2 Ripsaw tires, we’ve been getting a lot of questions on fitting 2.2 tires onto our SCX10 line of trucks. Bolting the 2.2 tires and wheels up to the truck isn’t all that difficult, but you will have issues with tires rubbing the bumpers and body. A little trim job to the bumpers and body will fix that though, and give your scale truck a little more aggressive look. For this article I am going to use our RTR SCX10 Honcho. I chose the Honcho because it has a little longer wheelbase then the Dingo TR, which will fit the 2.2 tires and wheels better. The Honcho will be the easiest to modify too, because you will only have to modify the front bumper and body.

Here’s how the Honcho looked before I got started:
dsc_0024

Here’s a few side by side pictures of the two tires:
dsc_0088

dsc_0061

dsc_0079

Here you can see this same Honcho with the 2.2 Ripsaw tires and wheels mounted, before I started cutting:
dsc_0005

dsc_0009

dsc_0019

Here are a few more photos highlighting the problem areas. Notice the 2.2 tire hitting the body and front bumper way before the suspension bottoms out:
22-honcho-045

22-honcho-046

22-honcho-053

First thing we are going to do is remove the front bumper and cut it back so the tires clear it as the suspension cycles. Start by removing the center skid plate from the front bumper:
22-honcho-058

Now remove the lights from the front bumper, and pull it off your truck:
22-honcho-060

After removing the bumper, take the remaining 2 skid plates out of the bumper as well. Here you can see that I will cut along the edge of the bumper in the area highlighted by my hex driver:
22-honcho-063

After I cut the wings off I used an X-acto knife to smooth everything out:
22-honcho-065

Reinstall the bumper, lights and center skid:
22-honcho-069

Here you can see the tires clear the bumper with ease now, even when the suspension cycles:
22-honcho-073

Now, with the body on the chassis, we can check to see how much cutting it’ll take to clear the tires:
22-honcho-077

Next, I laid the cut line out on the body with a black marker, so it’s easier to visualize the final cut:
22-honcho-078

Cut the body a little less then you think you’ll need, and recheck to see if anything is still rubbing:
22-honcho-082

Here you can see the tire is still hitting the body just a little:
22-honcho-087

This is how it will looks after the final trim is done:
22-honcho-088

Now repeat the last few steps for the other side of the body:
22-honcho-089

22-honcho-090

And you’re done and ready for fun!
22-honcho-092

Overall stance after being chopped:
22-honcho-205

While this Honcho may not look as scale as it used to, the capabilities gained will far outweigh the slight loss in scale appearance.