AX90046 SCX10 II Jeep Cherokee Kit Build Series – Part 6

AX90046SCX10II_JeepCherokeeKit_Build_Series_Part6

Assembling the Wild Boar Driveshafts is a fairly simple task and should only take you a few minutes to complete. There are however a few tips we’re going to throw in to make sure the parts work well for those long treks on the trail. Ready, set, build!

TOOLS NEEDED
2mm Hex Driver
Side cutters
Supplied grease and threadlock also required

STEP 1
Axial SCX WB Driveshafts 1
Start by cutting the driveshaft parts from the parts trees. The trees have various size driveshaft parts on them so reference the manual to see exactly which parts you need.

STEP 2
Axial SCX WB Driveshafts 2
Here we start to assemble the driveshafts and it is extremely important to add thread lock to the screws before inserting them into the driveshaft and screwing it into the universal mounting boss.

STEP 3
Axial SCX WB Driveshafts 3
After the end is screwed into the driveshaft, place a small dab of grease on the hex driver and use it to coat the inside of the driveshaft end.

STEP 4
Axial SCX WB Driveshafts 4
With the ends greased, you can slip the universal barrels into the ends.

STEP 5
Axial SCX WB Driveshafts 5
Slip the drive cup over the end and line-up the cross-pin holes. Once the holes are lined up, you can insert the pins.

STEP 6
Axial SCX WB Driveshafts 6
To secure the pins in place, you’ll simply need to slide the plastic sleeve over the cups. Set-screws will hold these in place later.

STEP 7
Axial SCX WB Driveshafts 7
Assemble the rest of the driveshaft by inserting the appropriate slider into the Wild Boar shafts.

STEP 8
Axial SCX WB Driveshafts 8
Now the shafts are attached to the transmission output shafts. Here you’ll use the set-screw pins to secure the drive cups to the output shaft. You may use a dab of threadlock on the set-screws for extra security. Note, if the holes for the drive cup do not line up with the shaft, you may have installed the shaft incorrectly, go back and rebuild the gearcase if necessary.

STEP 9
Axial SCX WB Driveshafts 9
The skidplate is up next for installation. This is simple, secure it to the transmission case with the two provided flathead allen screws.

STEP 10
Axial SCX WB Driveshafts 10
The transmission mounts are installed next. Pay close attention to the direction in which they are installed. Snug the two buttonhead screws that secure the mounts.

FINISHED
Axial SCX WB Driveshafts 11
With several sections of the manual complete, the next steps will really start turning parts into an actual rig. Make sure you check back for the next part of our kit build!

AX90046 SCX10 II Jeep Cherokee Kit Build Series – Part 5

AX90046SCX10II_JeepCherokeeKit_Build_Series_Part5

We’re getting into some fun territory here on our SCX10 Jeep Cherokee Kit Build, moving on to the transmission assembly. The build is fairly straight forward with a few notes that you need to know in order to build this important part of the vehicle properly. You’ll only need a few tools here such as a 2mm hex driver, needle nose pliers and the kit box wrench. Let’s build!

STEP 1
Axial SCX Transmission2
First up is building the gearshafts which is faily simple unless you jumped right into putting parts together and not reading the manual. Note, there are two bearing sizes in the parts bag. The larger bearings are used in this step. Also there are two types of cross pins used to support the gears. You’ll need to use the larger pins here. And finally make sure you use the correct spacer tubes on the shafts shown here. Slide the parts together as shown.

STEP 2
Axial SCX Transmission3
Now we can slip the assembled shafts into the transmission half. Before doing so, coat the gears in grease.

STEP 3
Axial SCX Transmission4
Slip the other half of the transmission case on the shafts and give them a little wiggle to help seat the bearings in the case. Screw the halves together and install the transmission support post.

STEP 4
Axial SCX Transmission5
The transfer case is assembled next. Push the bearings into the case first.

STEP 5
Axial SCX Transmission6
This is somewhat of a tricky step. You’ll want to start by pushing the transfer case half on to the transmission over the output shaft. Then you’ll need to use your pliers to install the small cross-pin that keys to the gear. Once that is done, you can install the rest of the gears, shafts and pins. Then place the outside transmission half on and bolt it together with the supplied hardware.

STEP 6
Axial SCX Transmission7
The motorplate and back half of the gearcover are up next. These are simply pressed together and bolted onto the transmission case with three screws.

STEP 7
Axial SCX Transmission8
The slipper assembly gets a few notes too. Start by washing your hands. You don’t want greasy fingers on the pads. Next remove the white paper from the pad revealing the adhesive. Carefully place the pad into the keyed spur gear. Do this for both sides. Now slip a metal plate on the top shaft, followed by the spur gear bushing, the spur and then the second metal plate. Follow this with the spring and retaining nut. Tighten the retaining nut until you see 2-3 threads of the top shaft. This is a good starting point until you adjust the slipper later.

STEP 8
Axial SCX Transmission9
Finalize the slipper assembly by installing the spring and retaining nut. Tighten the retaining nut until you see 2-3 threads of the top shaft. This is a good starting point until you adjust the slipper later.

STEP 9
Axial SCX Transmission10
Now is the right time to install your motor and pinion gear. There is a slot in the side of the gear cover that will allow you to tighten the pinion gear with your 2mm hex driver. Take your time to set the gear lash properly so it doesn’t bind, nor is too loose.

STEP 10
Axial SCX Transmission11
Button up this transmission build by installing the gear cover on the front. Just be sure to carefully slide it on so the tab covers the slot where your hex driver was used to install the pinion.

AX90046 SCX10 II Jeep Cherokee Kit Build Series – Part 4

AX90046SCX10II_JeepCherokeeKit_Build_Series_Part4
We’re moving into a tricky area of our SCX10 II Build, the shocks. The AX90046  comes with the licensed Icon Vehicle Dynamics aluminum body oil filled coil-over shocks (AX30103) which are the preferred shocks for serious off-roaders. The shocks go together nice and smooth and offer excellent performance on the trail. Of course we do have a few tips to pass along to help you with building them so let’s get right into it.

GET READY
Axial SCX Icon Shocks 1
Like we’ve suggested in previous posts, it’s a great idea to get all the parts together that you’ll need to build this part of the kit. For tools you’ll need a pair of side-cutters, long nose pliers and we suggest TLR shock shaft pliers to hold the shafts. You can find TLR pliers HERE.

STEP 1
Axial SCX Icon Shocks 2
First up, we need to install the spring pre-load nut on the shocks. Using side-cutters, cut the nut off the tree and screw it onto the shock with the flange side facing the logos. Screw the nut on several threads so the shock caps can be installed later.

STEP 2
Axial SCX Icon Shocks 3
Oh, this is a fun job! Installing the e-clips on the shock shafts, watch out, they could go flying if you are not careful! With your needle nose pliers, snap the e-clip into the lower slot on the top of the shock shaft. Then slide your piston over the shaft and secure the top with another e-clip. Take your time here so you don’t lose any clips or damage the piston with the pliers.

STEP 4
Axial SCX Icon Shocks 4
Here is a tip you may not know. Before installing the o-rings in the shock, place them in a plastic bag from the kit followed by a few drops of shock oil and make sure they’re coated. This helps the shock feel smoother when completed.

STEP 5
Axial SCX Icon Shocks 5
Why are we showing you the shock o-ring spacers in a stand-alone photo? It is critical to cut the spacers from the tree without any extra plastic flashing. Extra plastic here could cause unwanted friction in the shock.

STEP 6
Axial SCX Icon Shocks 6
It’s time to install the shock seals into the bodies. Slip one o-ring into the base of the shocks, followed by the plastic spacer, then another o-ring followed by the lower shock cap. Tighten the lower cap firmly. After the seals are assembled, place a dot of oil on the shock shaft threads and slips the shafts into the shock bodies.

STEP 7
Axial SCX Icon Shocks 7
The lower shock ends need to be screwed onto the shock shafts. Do not use knurled pliers to hold the shaft, this could damage the shaft which will tear the o-ring seals. We suggest using shock shaft pliers to hold the shafts while installing the ends. Then pop the pivot balls into the shock ends.

STEP 8
Axial SCX Icon Shocks 8
You’ll need to prep the top shock cap before you fill your shocks with oil. These Icon replica shocks come with faux reservoirs for scale style. You’ll need to place the Icon logo on the reservoirs and then screw them to the shock caps. You’ll also need to slip an o-ring seal into the top of the cap. Watch, the o-ring may fall out. If this happens, placing a drop of oil in the cap can help keep it in place.

STEP 9
Axial SCX Icon Shocks 10
Fill the shock bodies with oil. After you fill the shock with oil almost to the top, take the shock shaft and slowly cycle it up and down. This will release any unwanted air.

STEP 10
Axial SCX Icon Shocks 11
Before screwing on the shock cap, push the shock shaft almost all the way up to the top.

STEP 11
Axial SCX Icon Shocks 12
With the shock shaft at the top, screw the shock cap onto the body and wipe off any excess oil with a paper tower. When the shock is assembled, the shock shaft should be able to be pushed all the way up to the top. If you have a large gap of shock shaft showing, you will have to bleed out excess oil. To do so, loosen the cap a few turns and push the shaft up. Oil should bleed out. Once a little oil bleeds out, retighten the cap and try it again. Keep bleeding the shock until the shaft reaches the top.

STEP 12
Axial SCX Icon Shocks 13
We’re getting close to wrapping up these shocks! Slide the springs over the shock bodies and slip on the shock perch. Snap an additional pivot ball into the shock caps.

FINISHED
Axial SCX Icon Shocks 14
Here’s how your shocks should look once completed. Note that there are front and rear springs so place them on the vehicle later accordingly.

How Car Transmissions & Synchromesh Work

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Chances are that at some point you found yourself scratching that head of yours attempting to figure out how a manual transmission and synchromesh gears work. Dating all the way back to 1936, Chevrolet developed a movie called “Spinning Gears” that explains just how everything works. Pop some popcorn, kickback and learn.

On another note, this video was produced back in 1936. Meaning all of those graphics and editing were done by hand, as in no computers were used. That’s super cool.

 

Video LINKhttps://youtu.be/aFvj6RQOLtM

Oliver Knives How-To Build for AWCC 2011 Prizes

From Dwane Oliver of Oliver Knives

I get this particular knife cut out at a water jet place back east. It saves me about 1.5 hrs. This is the only one I do this with. The rest of my knives I cut from barstock. When I get them I aneal them , put them in the oven at about 1400 deg F , let em get up to temp and then just shut the oven off and let them cool real slow. This makes them dead soft.

Then I flatten the edge so I can mark it with a sharpie and mark the grinds. This is the tool I use for that.


Then I get my sander set up to do a flad grind. I built this sander from scratch , it’s built just like the ones you can buy , but mine has a 2hp DC variable speed motor, and I built a vertical 5/8″ shaft on the other end. I can put several different tools on it.

I built a small work rest to do flat grinds on , it helps to hold the blade still.


The belt direction is down , I always grind into the edge , never away.

Here is one that has been ground next to one that hasn’t.

I start on a 60 grit belt then go to a 120 grit and then 220 grit before heat treat.

Here they are , ready for the oven to be heat treated.

My digitally controlled oven , it will go up to 2200 deg I think.
1095 High Carbon steel heat treats at 1550 , I take them to 1600.

They are in there , wow that’s hot.

When I take them out of the oven I dunk them in the quenching oil , that cools them off very fast. As long as your grinds are even you don’t hear a pop when you drop them in. If you do ……its cracked and now scrap iron. lol , its has happened to me before, not in about 5 years though 8)

After they cool off to about 200 deg , I put them in the toaster oven at about 325 deg for 2 hours.


Here they are after the heat treatment , that’s the oil burned on the blade.

I then go back to the grinder on a 120 belt , 220 , 320 , 400 then a burishing 3M belt. Makes a great brushed finish. Here they are after that…..I had some others at the same stage and just shot them all.

While the blades were in the oven I made the handle material. I buy the G10 ( fiberglass composite ) in different thickness and colors and then laminate them together. Not all of the choices , just custom ones like this.
I sand each side with a 30 grit block and then use Devcon 5 min epoxy to hold em together. I put it in my 20 ton press and squeeze the chit outa it.


Cut up and ready to put on the blades.

Here they are again , with handles on them , epoxy drying , it dont take long before I can start shaping them. I also put 4 brass pins all the way through the handle. this helps with latteral strains.



Sanding and shaping is done on the belt grinder , I have a .500″ wheel that works great for the finger groove. I use a Hook-it II system( 6″ disks with hook and loop straps on them , real fast to change grits ) mounted on the vertical shaft to finish sand handles on. Missed a pic of that.

Now its time to make the Kydex sheaths. Kydex is a heat moldable ABS based plastic , its super tough stuff , and really cool to work with. If you mess up a mold , you just put it back in the oven and try again.

Here is my home made Press , it just has 2″ of a real dense foam on the bottom and then 1″ on the top.

Here is the first one ready for pressing. I tape the chit outa the blade to give it some room inside the sheath , the square on the handle is for the loop to attach to. The Kydex I decided to use has a silver carbon fiber look to it , i think it looks cool. It goes in the oven at 325 deg F hard as hell and comes out soft as dough.

Its pretty simple , put a piece of sheet down , the knife on that and another sheet on top and press…..2 min later and take it out and here it is.


I have a system of holes for these sheaths that will accept 2 different kinds of attachment , there is a rhyme and reason for the layout. It can be worn right or left handed , cross draw or upside down. Pretty cool I think. The rivets closest to the handle are critical in placement. They are the ones that dictate how tight the knife fits the sheath.

Drill a 1/4″ hole and put a rivet in it and press it in the arbor press.

I make my own stencils for marking my name on my blades too. I use this light sensitive material , its like a silkscreen. You put the negative on the glass and then put the stencil material on top. Close the lid , turn on the light , wait 2.5 min and turn the light off. Take it out , peel a clear film off each side and put it in the developer for about a min…..done.



Then I just tape the stencil on the blade and etch it on there , comes out cool most of the time. These came out pretty good.

AND here they are. As Parker would say…Those drivers that Do Work , will reap the rewards. The winner of each class will get a hand made knife.
Here are the two for the 2.2 pro and Sportsman classes.


And a special one for the winner of the G6 scale competition.
It has Moon Glow in the center of the handle , man its some bright stuff and glows for hours. The lanyard has glow string in it as well. It is also equipped with a whistle and a Black Crater cord light flashlight. Of course all of the knives have a ferrocerium fire steel in the handle as well.






Well I hope you enjoyed my little how to here.
I wish I was going to AWCC , but it just ain’t meant to be I guess. There will be a little bit of my sweat there though , these were fun to make.

Oliver Knives – Official Sponsor of the AWCC 2011

Fitting 2.2 Ripsaw tires on your SCX10

Ever since we posted the sneak peek video of our new 2.2 Ripsaw tires, we’ve been getting a lot of questions on fitting 2.2 tires onto our SCX10 line of trucks. Bolting the 2.2 tires and wheels up to the truck isn’t all that difficult, but you will have issues with tires rubbing the bumpers and body. A little trim job to the bumpers and body will fix that though, and give your scale truck a little more aggressive look. For this article I am going to use our RTR SCX10 Honcho. I chose the Honcho because it has a little longer wheelbase then the Dingo TR, which will fit the 2.2 tires and wheels better. The Honcho will be the easiest to modify too, because you will only have to modify the front bumper and body.

Here’s how the Honcho looked before I got started:
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Here’s a few side by side pictures of the two tires:
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Here you can see this same Honcho with the 2.2 Ripsaw tires and wheels mounted, before I started cutting:
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Here are a few more photos highlighting the problem areas. Notice the 2.2 tire hitting the body and front bumper way before the suspension bottoms out:
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First thing we are going to do is remove the front bumper and cut it back so the tires clear it as the suspension cycles. Start by removing the center skid plate from the front bumper:
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Now remove the lights from the front bumper, and pull it off your truck:
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After removing the bumper, take the remaining 2 skid plates out of the bumper as well. Here you can see that I will cut along the edge of the bumper in the area highlighted by my hex driver:
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After I cut the wings off I used an X-acto knife to smooth everything out:
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Reinstall the bumper, lights and center skid:
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Here you can see the tires clear the bumper with ease now, even when the suspension cycles:
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Now, with the body on the chassis, we can check to see how much cutting it’ll take to clear the tires:
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Next, I laid the cut line out on the body with a black marker, so it’s easier to visualize the final cut:
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Cut the body a little less then you think you’ll need, and recheck to see if anything is still rubbing:
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Here you can see the tire is still hitting the body just a little:
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This is how it will looks after the final trim is done:
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Now repeat the last few steps for the other side of the body:
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And you’re done and ready for fun!
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Overall stance after being chopped:
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While this Honcho may not look as scale as it used to, the capabilities gained will far outweigh the slight loss in scale appearance.