Axial – ICON Vehicle Dynamics 61-90mm Aluminum Shocks – Step by Step Build

AX30103 – Icon 61-90mm Aluminum Shock Set – 7mm piston (2pcs)

Now that we have released Axial’s newest scale shocks, which are officially licensed by Icon Vehicle Dynamics, I wanted to take some time to do a step by step build here on the blog to help people get the most out of their new shocks. These shocks are an improvement over our old SCX10 shocks, because of the new fully machined shock piston. The new piston provides a tighter fit inside the shock body which helps eliminate binds as the shock cycles through its travel. The new Icon shock bodies and reservoirs are clear anodized for durability and classic looks, which is a nice touch. Time to dig in and get our hands dirty!

A shot of the packaging. Each package contains all parts and hardware required to build two complete shocks.

I cut all the plastic parts I will need to get started off their respective parts trees.

Open the hardware bags and dump the contents out in a secure location so you don’t loose any vital parts.

Start by locating your aluminum shock bodies and the red o-rings. Apply a little grease to each o-ring before installing them into the shock bodies.

Once you have the o-ring lubed up drop it into place in the bottom of the shock body.

Now locate the plastic spacer that goes in between the o-rings, and install that on top of the first o-ring.

Grease the 2nd o-ring and install it into place on top of the plastic spacer in the shock body.

Next install the lower plastic cartridge and threaded preload adjuster onto the shock body.

Locate your shock shafts and e-clips next.

Install the first e-clip in the bottom slot on the shock shaft.

Slide the shock piston onto the shock shaft next.

Then, install the second e-clip to hold the piston in place.

Both shafts prepped and ready for the next step.

Now we can slide the shock shafts into the shock body from the top. Install the rubber bump stops and thread the rod ends into place as needed.

Apply the Icon decals to the shock reservoirs.

Using the supplied hardware, secure the shock reservoirs to the shock caps.

Insert the black o-rings into the shock cap, and make sure they are properly seated.

Now we will fill the shock body about 3/4 of the way with shock oil and cycle the shock piston to dissipate any and all air bubbles. Make sure the piston stays submersed in the oil while you cycle the shock to get rid of the air bubbles. Once the bubbles are gone fill the shock body until the oil is about 1/16th of an inch from the top of the shock body, so just shy of being full. Once the shock shaft is fully compressed, you should see the oil crown just above the top of the shock body. Screw the cap down tight while holding the shock shaft fully compressed. Once the cap is tight, wipe any excess oil away. Cycle the shock shaft a few times and listen for air bubbles. If you can hear air bubbles gurgling around inside the shock, start over and use a little more oil. Make sure all air bubbles are gone before re-assembling. If the shock shaft won’t compress all the way after this step, you have a little too much oil in the shock body. Remove the shock cap, and re-bleed the shock with a little less oil.

After you are finished bleeding the shock we can install the dual rate springs and spacers as needed.

Slide the springs over the shock body with the plastic spring retainer between the two springs.

Install the lower spring retainer next, and you are done!

That wraps up building Axial’s new fully licensed Icon shocks. Following these tips will help people get the most out of their new SCX10 shocks.

Project Wrexo – Body Off Photos

Most of you have seen a couple sneak peek photos of the latest project I have been working on dubbed “Project Wrexo.” Here are a few more teaser shots for you to check out. More details will be released on this project soon, as well as some video. So stay tuned to Axial’s blog for the latest!

Vanquish – Currie Rock Jock Axle Install – Wraith

As some of you may have seen, I recently wrote an article about swapping stock SCX10 housings out for the aluminum Currie Rock Jock axle housings from Vanquish Products. Vanquish has now taken these axle housings a step further by offering them for the Wraith as well. The assembly on these axles is very similar to the SCX10 version, which is fairly simple. The two biggest differences between the axles is the SCX10 ring and pinion assembly is centered on the axle, and the axle tubes are equal lengths. The Wraith version has the offset ring and pinion assembly with one short axle tube and one long.

I came back from lunch a few days ago to find that the “Vanquish Fairy” had left some parts on my desk for me. One quick look and I knew exactly what was in the package. Time to install some bling on my custom Wroncho build. Let’s get busy!

A shot of the front and rear axles.

I started with the rear axle, here you can see all the parts are sealed in separate bags to prevent damage during shipping.

Once you have your old axles torn down, grab the pinion gear and the two bearings used to support it.

Install a bearing on the pinion shaft and press it into the axle housing by hand.

Now set your ring gear assembly into place.

Use the supplied M3 hardware to secure the bearing caps that hold the ring gear assembly.

Time for the axle tubes. Here you can see the parts and tools required. A set of snap ring pliers are needed for this step.

Insert a 5x11mm bearing into the end of the axle tube, and install the snap ring to hold it in place.

Slide the axle shafts into place next.

Then install the drive pins and hexes.

Completed axle tubes ready for install.

Now insert the long axle tube into the axle housing opposite the ring gear.

Add a dab of blue thread lock to the M3 set screw.

Install the M3 set screw into the axle housing to locate the tube. Then do the same for the short side axle tube.

Now install the axle truss per the instructions to properly time the whole assembly.

Now install your four M3 set screws that secure the axle tubes to the center section. Don’t forget to add a dab of thread lock to these as well.

Now remove the axle truss so you can install the differential cover.

Add a little grease to the ring and pinion gears before installing the diff cover.

This is also a good time to fill the unused holes in the axle tubes with the provided set screws in the axle kit. Add a little thread lock to each one so they stay in place. Make sure you leave the holes needed to secure the axle truss empty as well.

Now install the diff cover using the supplied hardware.

Re-install the axle truss using thread lock per the instructions.

Install the link mounts.

Last but not least, install the differential skid plate.

Now we will move on to the front axle.

Dissect your front axle and set the parts you will reuse aside.

Grab the front axle’s center section and the rest of the parts required to complete this step.

Slide the pinion gear and bearings into the center section.

Drop the ring gear assembly in the housing and install the bearing caps with the supplied hardware.

Locate your axle tubes and the required set screws.

Insert the axle tubes into the housing’s center section and install the M3 set screws to locate the tubes.

Temporarily install the axle truss.

Add a little thread lock to the set screws used to tie the tubes to the center section.

Install the set screws to lock the axle tubes into place.

Remove the axle truss, grease the gears and install the differential cover.

Install the supplied set screws into the unused holes on the axle tubes.

Now you can used thread lock and install the axle truss permanently.

Bolt the link mounts into place on the axle.

Install the plastic skid plate on the axle’s center section.

Slide a 5x11mm bearing into the ends of the axle tubes.

I am using the Vanquish chassis mounted steering kit on this build, so I installed the 3 link mount on the axle tube at this time.

Install the inner axles, c-hubs, knuckles, steering tie rod and you are done.

That wraps up the Vanquish Rock Jock axle swap for the AR60 axles. For those that missed the SCX10 axle housing swap, here is a link to that article.
http://www.axialracing.com/blog_posts/1073902689

Project Wrexo – The Ingredients!

Overall chassis shots.

Detailed shots. Here you can see the details of the EXO front end. The front toe block was flipped 180* to get a little more kick-up.

A shot from the top out front. Here you can see one of the chassis braces running from the top of the bulkhead to the upper link mount on the Wraith skid. I also had to clock the steering servo so the servo horn cleared the cage work. It now runs parallel with the front driveshaft, which provides just enough clearance.

A shot of the rear axle and its suspension set-up. I used an old AX10 chassis plate to make the rear shock towers and sway bar mount.

The rear cage has been cut since these photos were taken, in order to mount a full size spare.

A couple finished shots with the spare tire mounted.

The ingredients:
AX90020 – Wraith Kit
AX90015 – EXO Kit
AX30091 – 67 – 90mm Aluminum Shocks (Front)
AX30222 – 14 x 70mm 3.55 lbs/in Blue Springs (Front)
AX30092 – 72 – 100mm Aluminum Shocks (Rear)
AX30224 – 14 x 70mm 1.43 lbs/in Purple Springs (Rear)
AX30825 – EXO Front Shock Tower (Front)
AX30811 – EXO F1 Toe Block (Front)
AX30812 – EXO F2 Toe Block (Front)
AX30815 – EXO Machined Steering Rack (Front)
AX30415 – EXO CVD’s (Front)
AX30781 – Wraith Front Sway Bar (Rear)
AX30829 – Wraith HD Differential Cover (Rear)
AX30402 – HD 43/13 Ring and Pinion Set (Rear)
AX30789 – Wraith Aluminum Lockouts (Rear)
AX30860 – HD Motor Plate
AX80059 – XR10 Lower Link Mount Sleeves
AX24260 – Vanguard Brushless ESC
AX24010 – Vanguard Brushless Motor
AX30836 – 25t HD Aluminum Servo Horn
AX12015 – R35 Ripsaw Tires
AX90001 – OG Axial Scorpion Chassis Plate (Rear upper shock towers)
AX30519 - 101mm x 30* grey links x2 – rear upper links
AXA1420 – 15mm grey post x2 – sway bar links
AXA1421 – 20mm grey post x1 – steering drag link
AXA1424 – 35mm grey post x2 – chassis brace ties upper/lower cage together
AXA1425 – 40mm grey post x2 – front upper links for IFS
AXA1427 – 50mm grey post x2 – steering tie rods
AXA1428 – 55mm grey post x2 – shock braces front and rear
AXA1429 – 60mm grey post x2 – rear upper roll cage supports
AXA1431 – 70mm grey post x1 – front bulkhead brace
AXA1413 – 1mm grey spacer x10 – washers and front upper suspension arms
AXA1414 – 2mm grey spacer x10 – washers, front bulkhead brace and steering drag link
AXA1415 – 3mm grey spacer x10 – chassis brace ties upper/lower cage together
AXA1416 – 4mm grey spacer x10 – rear lower links, sway bar
AXA1417 – 5mm grey spacer x10 – front chassis brace
AX30475 – 74.5mm grey links x3 – rear lower links and rear upper shock mount brace

All links and spacers listed are for the color grey, not red. All red links and the 74.5mm links are now discontinued.

Parts sourced from Vanquish Products.
Vanquish SSZ-Star Wheels (Soon to be re-released)
Vanquish .350 Hubs (Front)
Vanquish .600 Hubs (Rear)

Custom Rock Sliders

Here’s a few tips on making your own custom length rock sliders out of stock plastic Axial rock sliders that are included with all SCX10 vehicles. The stock sliders look great and are fully functional. But, for a few of my custom builds the rock sliders are too short to use, when compared to the length of the body’s rocker panels. I have been wanting to extend the stock rock sliders for these projects, but never got around to it. Brandon recently extended a set for one of his custom builds and they turned out pretty nice. So, I decided it was time I modded a set for myself to see how it would work. Here are a few tips to help anyone that wants to attempt this same modification.

You will need 2 sets of rock sliders to make one extended set. First thing I did was cut the rock sliders as needed. To get the length I wanted I needed to leave 7 holes in front half and 4 holes for the second half.

After I cut the sliders to length I drilled holes in the ends that were cut. I than wallowed out the holes with a drill bit so they would be tapered.

Using some plastic from an old parts tree I made some pins to press into the 2 halves of the rock sliders.

Now you will need to check the fit of the mating part. Chances are you will have to do some more trimming on the pins to make everything line up properly. Take your time here and check the overall fit often. Once everything lines up, you can use some tire glue to join the two halves together.

I had to drill new holes in the frame for the rock slider’s mounting tabs, since the sliders are now longer the mounting points on the frame rails have to be re-located.

Overall shot of the finished product.

Project Wrexo – Bender’s Latest Custom Build

Now that Axial is the official R/C company of Ultra 4 Racing, I figured it was time to build a proper Ultra 4 R/C vehicle. If you are not familiar with Ultra 4 Racing it basically combines low speed “rock crawling” with high speed “baja” style racing. So, your vehicle has to be able to handle technical rock sections and high speed desert bumps in the same race, on the same day. Most hardcore off-road enthusiasts know a solid axle set-up front and rear rules in low speed rock crawling. And most of those same off-road fans know that independent suspension rules for high speed and jumps. There are a few competitors in Ultra 4 Racing that have been mixing the two set-ups together for a suspension system that works decent in both situations. Shannon Campbell was the first to try this, if I am not mistaken, and he has had great success winning the King of the Hammers crown in 2008 and 2011. Shannon’s rig runs independent suspension up front and a solid axle set-up in the rear. This latest custom build has been dubbed “Project Wrexo” and follows suit with that hybrid suspension set-up. Here’s a little sneak peek at this new build, more details and info to come soon so keep an eye on Axial’s blog and Facebook page.

Vanquish – Currie Rock Jock Axle Install – SCX10

I was finally able to get my grubby hands on a set of the new Vanquish / Currie Rock Jock axle housings. These are fully licensed replicas of the custom 1 ton axles Currie Enterprises makes for 1:1 rock crawlers and King of the Hammers style vehicles. The 1:1 axles feature a high pinion center differential housing, which helps move your driveshafts up out of harms way. This feature also rotates the differential cover up to help avoid hitting the cover on rocks, and possibly damaging a ring gear. These new Vanquish axle housings have the same features as their 1:1 counter parts, and are fully machined from billet aluminum. Every part in this kit is a work of art. For those that aren’t familiar with my background, I was a machinist for about 15 years before coming to work for Axial. So I really appreciate the effort Vanquish put into these, as it had to be very time consuming. Especially since these housings are compatible with all the stock Axial internals, a nice bonus for sure! The machine work is executed perfectly too, with no sharp edges or burrs to be found on any of the parts. Great quality control is key, and Vanquish has it down!! Let’s get started on the conversion!

A shot of the front and rear axles, as well as the link kit for the axle install.

We will be performing surgery on my old Dingo which I converted into the new Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon.

I started with the rear axle first. A shot of all the components included with the axle kit.

Start by removing the wheels and tires.

Then unbolt the upper links, lower links and shocks from the axle housing. Then remove the rear axle.

I am going to install a few upgrades while I am making the conversion too. First up is a set of HD under drive ring and pinion gears. These gears are made from hardened steel, and are helical cut for strength and durability.

Remove the rear axle lockouts, and slide the inner axles out of the housing. I also removed the outer 5x11mm bearings as well.

Unbolt the rear axle housing, and split the case open to gain access to the ring and pinion gears.

Pull the ring and pinion out of the housing and remove the ring gear from the locker assembly. Take care not to rip the gasket between the ring gear and case, as we will need to re-use it.

After installing the new ring gear, grab the rear center section of the housing.

Slide one of the 5x11mm bearings onto the pinion shaft and insert it into place in the new housing. Then install the second 5x11mm bearing to support the drivesahft side of the pinion gear.

Insert the ring gear assembly into the housing next, and install the supplied bearing caps over the bearings.

A close-up photo of the bearing caps. Notice they can only be installed one way, the bigger diameter supports the bearings on each side of the ring gear assembly.

Next grab your axle tubes, inner axles, bearing and snap rings needed to complete this step.

You will need a set of snap ring pliers to complete this step. They can be found at any hardware or auto parts stores. Keep in mind there are specific tools for inner and outer snap rings, so make sure what you get will work. This set of snap ring pliers can pull double duty and works for either style snap ring, which is nice.

Compress the snap ring and insert it into place in the end of the axle tube.

A shot of the snap ring installed. The ring comes very close to rubbing the axle shaft, but it does clear when fully supported by all bearings.

Once both axle shafts and snap rings are in place you can install the drive pins and hexes.

Grab some blue thread lock for the next step, which is installing the tubes into the center section.

Add a dab of thread lock to the supplied M3 set screws, and insert them per the instructions to temporarily hold the tubes in place.

Both axle tubes in place, ready for the next step.

Locate the supplied axle truss and hardware.

Install the axle truss to locate/time the two axle tubes to the center section. Then, per the instructions, install the four M3 set screws that secure the axle tubes to the center section. Make sure the tops of the set screws are flush, or just below flush with the center section’s outer lip. The screws will go in a little tight, but they will go in.

Once the tubes are secured, remove the axle truss, and install the differential cover. Don’t forget to grease the ring and pinion gears before bolting the differential cover into place.

Now re-install the axle truss using blue thread lock. You can also install the link mounts at this time too.

Screw the supplied plastic differential skid to the center section of the axle housing. This piece will let the axles slide over obstacles easier than if it was just the aluminum.

You will notice there are holes in the axle tubes that aren’t utilized at this time. I installed some small M3 set screws into these holes, with a dab of blue thread lock, to keep debris out of the housings.

Notice the machined “weld marks” to replicate a real 1:1 axle truss. Another cool feature these axles offer to complete the scale look.

Rear axle done!!

Now we will move on to the front axle.

Remove the wheels, tires and all hardware that holds the front axle in place.

Remove the steering links, unbolt the c-hubs and remove the knuckle assembly with the inner axles intact.

Split the axle case to gain access to the ring and pinon gears.

If applicable, install the new ring gear onto the locker assembly.

Again, slide a 5x11mm bearing over the pinion shaft and slide it into place in the housing.

Insert the axle tubes into place per the instructions. Then install the two M3 set screws to hold the tubes in place.

Temporarily install the axle truss to locate/time the axle tubes.

Apply a little blue thread lock to the four set screws and install them to secure the axle tubes. Then remove the axle truss.

Install the four tiny set screws into the front differential cover.

Then, bolt the differential cover into place. Again, don’t forget to grease the ring and pinon gears.

Now we can install the axle truss with blue thread lock per the instructions.

Flip the axle around and install the link mounts next.

Attach the center differential skid plate with the supplied screws.

Next I installed the servo mount for the steering servo.

Locate your front knuckle/axle assemblies.

One mod I did have to make was to my aluminum c-hubs. The Axial c-hubs are threaded for use with set screws in the stock plastic housing. But, the Vanquish housing is threaded aluminum too, which just won’t work together as the threads will never be timed properly. Keep in mind the stock plastic c-hubs will bolt right up with zero issues. To fix the issue I ran into I drilled the c-hub holes out to an 1/8″ diameter to clear the M3 screws. You will need to drill the bottom hole out in front and the top hole out in back. You can also drill all four out too without any issues. They will still bolt back up to plastic housings if need be.

A shot of the complete front axle. I am going to try and keep my high clearance knuckles in use with these housings. Just need to sling them under my Jeep to see how it will all play out.

A shot of both complete axles ready to be transplanted into my SCX10. So sick!!

For more info on these housings, and a ton of other killer products, be sure to visit the Vanquish website.
http://www.vanquishproducts.com/

Keep an eye out for the next blog post that will cover installing them into my SCX10.

Body Tech – 2012 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon Kit

Now that the “kit version” of Axial’s 2012 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon has been released I wanted to go over some tips on painting and assembling the body. This is Axial’s most detailed body to date, with several plastic bolt on accessories. There are numerous holes to be drilled in specific locations for all the “bolt on” accessories. This post is meant to help show people what order to assemble / paint this new body to get the best results. So, let’s get started!!

For this body I wanted the cut lines to be really clean, so instead of using standard Lexan body scissors, I used a new X-acto knife to cut out the body and hardtop. This method works great, but you have to be very careful not to veer off your intended cut line. Take your time and you shouldn’t have any issues. So, the first thing I did was use the knife to cut the hardtop lines.

Slowly follow the cut lines on the hardtop with the X-acto. You don’t have to push down very hard either. You are not trying to cut through the Lexan, you just want to score it with the blade.

After I have scored the body lines, I used Lexan scissors to rough the body out. Here you can see I stayed away from the finish cut lines with the scissors.

Once the excess Lexan is cut away you can start peeling the last bits of Lexan away from the body. You will basically be tearing the body on the score lines you created with the X-acto.

Here you can see the hardtop is cut out and ready for the next step.

Now add your window masks, and label the paint scheme if needed. I am using white and black for this particular body.

Next I cut the windshield out with scissors and applied the paint mask for the window.

Using the X-acto method again, I cut the main body out as needed. Then, I applied the paint masks for the headlights and turn signals because I want to add lights down the road.

Using a body reamer go ahead and ream the roll cage mounting holes around the interior to fit 3mm hardware.

Now assemble the roll cage complete.

Go ahead and bolt the roll cage to the body.

Out back the roll cage has a spare tire brace incorporated into the cage. Just loosen it up a little and flip it up and out of the way for now.

Now we will fit the hardtop to the body to mark the screw holes that hold the top into place. I used electrical tape on the sides of the body and hardtop to hold the top while I fine tuned it’s fit on the body.

At this point I took the time to mark any areas that may interfere with final assembly with a marker. Here you can see the hardtop lines will need to be trimmed a bit to clear the screws that hold the windshield in place.

Before you mark any holes to be drilled in the top, make sure your body lines match up on both sides.

Once all the body lines are properly lined up, go ahead and tape the top down to the main body, and mark the holes for the hardtop with a marker.

After the holes are all marked, remove the top and drill the holes as needed. Be careful not to go too big with these holes, as the screws for the top are smaller than the standard M3 hardware.

At this point I went ahead and notched the front of the hardtop to clear the windshield screws.

Now set your windshield in place and mark the holes to secure it to the roll cage.

Be careful drilling these holes as well, since there isn’t much excess material to work with. The hole should fall right between the molded studs in the windshield frame.

Now we can assemble the hard top, body and windshield to make sure everything fits properly.

Looking good!! At this point you can remove the hardtop and flip the spare tire brace back down. Slide the hardtop back into place until the brace touches the rear window and mark the hole for the brace to come through. Then, ream your hole to size so it slides over the spare tire brace.

Now we can turn our attention to the smaller details like tail lights, mirrors, shifter, steering wheel, etc. I used calipers to measure the distance between the molded stud on the tail lights and the mounting hole.

Next, I went ahead and marked the body with my calipers for where the tail lights should sit. We will drill our holes on that scribed line the proper distance apart.

The side of the tail light should sit almost flush with the outside of the body, so mark your holes as needed.

Test fit parts as you go to ensure proper fit.

We will take the same steps to mount the mirrors as we did to mount the tail lights. Measure the spread between the molded stud and the mounting hole on the mirror.

I measured from the top of the half door down .300, or just over a 1/4″, to the first hole for the mirror. Then moved down another .200 per my measurement, so the bottom hole is 1/2″ from the top of the door.

To keep the holes in line, I measure another .300 from the door seam to the mirror holes.

Ream your holes and double check the fit.

Now it’s time to mark the holes for the Poison Spyder Crusher Flares. I found the best way to do this was to use the plastic backing for the flares as a template to mark the holes. Set the proper back plate in place on the inside of the body, line everything up, and carefully mark your hole locations. You can also tape them in place, then mark the holes, to ensure they don’t move on you.

Holes marked……..

………and drilled.

Next up are the body mount holes. Set your body in place on top of the body posts, and carefully line it up front to back, and side to side.

Mark the body mounts on the outside of the body with your marker.

Partially ream the holes out and double check to make sure everything lines up properly.

If everything looks good, drill the holes out to size.

Last few items to take care of are the steering wheel, and shifter. To mark the steering wheel hole I just used my calipers to find the exact center of the panel the wheel mounts to, and marked it.

Drill your hole and double check the fit.

To mark the shifter holes, I held the shifter up to the inside of the body and marked the holes as needed.

And done!!

Now, we get to take the entire body apart, and remove all plastic accessories. Tedious yes, but needed to get a clean finished product. Now it is time to start painting. I chose white and black for the colors on this build to give it that “Stormtrooper” affect. I think Mr. Lucas would be proud!

I started by laying down a few good coats of rattle can white to the inside of the body, windshield and hardtop.

You will notice that some spots, like this seat, on the body aren’t covered with white very well. Most of those areas will be painted flat black on the outside of the body later. So, I didn’t worry about getting complete coverage in those areas.

After the coats of white were dry, I backed everything in black, like I usually do.

To paint the interior flat black, I cut the over spray film out of the interior area only with an X-acto. Then, carefully peeled it away so it didn’t pull any areas I don’t want painted away from the body. Take your time here as well. After you spray the interior, peel the rest of the over spray film off the body and it should look like this.

I followed the same procedure for the interior, as I did for the hard top. Cut the over spray film as needed, and peel it away before painting the flat black. I used a second set of window masks on the outside of the windows on the hardtop, so the windows will remain clear after paint. But, you can just leave the over spray film on the windows by cutting around it with your X-acto and use that as your paint mask.

Remove all window masks at this time. I used the tip of my knife to peel a corner up enough to grab with my fingers.

Notice I have a little white bleeding through the rear windows.

I used a marker to cover the paint, and once the window decal is in place it will still look pretty clean.

Apply the window decals.

Next we will apply all interior decals.

For the seats I tried something different. I only cut the center of the seat decals out with my knife and applied the center portion only.

Apply the exterior decals next.

Don’t forget your mirror and tail light decals.

Attach the tail lights to the body.

Install the steering wheel, don’t forget the Jeep decal that goes in the center.

Shifter installed.

Apply the windshield decal.

Before I bolted the Crusher Flares on I used my marker to color anything that will be inside the wheel well black, just for a cleaner look.

Now we can bolt the cage into place, add the windshield and install the hardtop. Notice there is a small white strip between the hardtop and the black rear quarter panel stickers. To fix this, I removed the top and broke out my trusty black marker and colored that strip of white in. You could also use vinyl, or electrical tape to cover it too.

If you find the sides of the hardtop wanting to bow out away from the body, you can use double stick tape on the tops of the doors to hold them tight.

The finished product.

Whew! That covers detailing your new Axial SCX10 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon kit body. A few things I would have done differently. One, make sure you get your base color of paint up inside the tops of the doors as best you can. This area’s coverage was a little thinner than I expected it to be, and you can see some shading from the black paint at certain angles. Two, I would have left the sides of the hardtop a little longer and trimmed after paint. The black paint left a shadow along the bottom of the sides. Not critical stuff, but just a few things to keep in mind. Good luck with your build and post it up on our Facebook page when you are done, we would love to see it.
http://www.facebook.com/axialinc?ref=hl

Axial “SCX10JK” s-POD Source and Rigid Industries Lighting

We have been slowly working on finishing up some final touches to the SCX10JK. As we all know, the work is never really done on a trail rig, but it is cool to get to that point where everything is in good working order, and you have some time to do some stuff that has been on hold. In our case, it was time to look at turning night into day.

While doing an extensive amount of research about off road lighting, we found this company called Rigid Industries. These guys are at the forefront of the LED light bar movement. It appears as though many of the lighting companies are going the way of LED, and most looking at the low profile option of light bars instead of the traditional round lamp and reflector housings. At the front of this pack sits Rigid Industries, innovating and setting the benchmark. The light bars they have developed have paved the way for almost every off road light manufacturer. The Jeep JK has been the most popular vehicle to showcase this lighting option, so there are lots of options for Rigid lights and mounting systems.

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Once again we headed over to Rebel Off Road to discuss these options for our JK. While discussing the options for the lighting the subject of power distribution arose. Rebel promptly recommended the s-POD Source.

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The s-POD Source is a dream come true for those looking for the perfect way to power accessories without having to build a complicated wiring system or worry about having a negative effect on the factory wiring. Most new vehicles these days have a very sophisticated wiring system that is built for diagnostics. This means that almost every wire is monitored in the amount of current that passes through it. This means any extra demands of that wire over and above its intended purpose will throw a code warning the driver that there is a potential problem with the vehicle wiring system. The s-POD Source is designed to take power directly from the vehicle’s battery and distribute it to 6 potential aftermarket options. This was exactly what we needed!

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We promptly ordered up the components to get the job done to include:
[1]s-POD Source
[1] Rigid Industries 50” E-Series Light Bar Combo
[1] Rigid Industries 10” E-Series Light Bar
[3] Rigid Industries Dually lights
[1] Poison Spyder Roof light bar mount
[1] Set Poison Spyder A-Pilar light mounts
[1] Fairlead mount for bumper light

Once the components arrived, we sent all the parts and the Jeep to Rebel Off Road to be outfitted. To start, Rebel mounted the s-POD and ran all the wiring, as well as mounted the mounting brackets for the lights
The Poison Spyder A-Pilar Mounts

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The Poison Spyder front Fairlead mount

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The s-POD comes with a direct fit mount for the Jeep JK vehicle.

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You simply hook up the positive and negative included wiring, and you are ready to power whatever you want.

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There is then 1 wiring harness that you run inside the vehicle to a vehicle specific switch panel. This panel for the Jeep JK is placed in between the sun visors, a perfect out of the way spot, yet easily reachable by the driver.

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The next step was to run the wiring to the lamp locations. Here is a shot of the a-pilar wiring location. Notice the awesome waterproof plugs that are provided with the Rigid Industries Lights

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With the wiring completed and the brackets in place, it was as simple as bolting the lights up and plugging them in!

The A-Pilar lights are small but offer a ton of light, as well as some quick side to side aiming options

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The 10” E-Series light mounted on the front bumper is a great light to illuminate what is directly in front of the vehicle

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The roof mounted Rigid Industries 50” E-Series lamp puts out massive amounts of light, and will be used to illuminate longer distances for higher speed night travel. This combo bar offers reflectors that also light up to the side of the vehicle for a wide range of viewing at night. It is mounted to a silver powder coated Poison Spyder LED bar mount.

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We are very much looking forward to hitting the trail at night, now that we will be able to see! These things even blind you during the day time!!

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For more information of these great products, please visit Rigid Industries here and s-POD here

To get the history on the Axial “SCX10JK”, please check out the following links! Be sure to check back often, as we will continue to build up the SCX10JK and fine tune it for maximum performance!

Axial “SCX10JK” Wilwood Brakes- Massive Stopping Power!

Axial “SCX10JK” tested – Moab, Utah for Easter Jeep Safari 2012

The Full Size Connection

Axial 2012 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon Unlimited

Axial Visits Rebel Off Road

Axial “SCX10JK” – Icon Suspension

Axial “SCX10JK” Armor – Poison Spyder Crusher Flares and Crusher Corners

Axial “SCX10JK” Armor – Poison Spyder Rocker Armor and Rocker Knockers

Axial “SCX10JK” Armor – Skid Plates from Rebel Off Road

Axial “SCX10JK” Walker Evans Wheels – Maxxis Tires – Rebel Roof Rack

Axial “SCX10JK” Armor – Poison Spyder Front and Rear Bumpers – TJM Winch

Scale Details – SCX10™ 2012 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon

Axial’s latest SCX10 release is an officially licensed 2012 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon. It is an RTR vehicle, which means it is ready to go as soon as you remove it from the box. The detail and realism of this latest release is awesome to see in person. The molded plastic rollcage, fenders and bumpers are all realistic features you would see on any hardcore 1:1 trail rig. Also included are molded plastic tail lights, side view mirrors, steering wheel, gear shifter, D-rings and even a fuel filler assembly for the Fuel Safe fuel cell which adds even more realism to the overall look.

For this article I will cover how you can add a little more detail to your new SCX10, with parts that are included in the RTR box. I will also go over a few other mods that you can make that require no out of pocket cost and really add to the overall look of your new Jeep.

One of those mods that can be done for free is cleaning up the inner fender wells front and rear. You will notice some extra Lexan around the inner fender wells, where the Poison Spyder Crusher Flares meet the Lexan Jeep body. We will trim this excess Lexan away to give the inner wheel wells a cleaner look.

First thing we want to do is use a marker inside the body to color the excess Lexan that hangs below the Crusher Flare’s inner plastic mount.

Once all 4 inner wheel wells are marked, you can remove the Crusher Flares with a 1.5mm driver.

Now you can see your cut line is clearly marked on the inside of the body.

Use a pair of curved body scissors and a sharp X-acto to clean up the excess Lexan. Be sure to leave plenty of meat around the mounting holes, you will only be trimming away a small amount of excess Lexan.

After the trim job is complete.

Next I used my marker again to color what little excess body still remained, and hide the silver from being seen once the flares are bolted back into place.

Now you can bolt your flares back up on all four corners. It looks a lot cleaner now.

Next we will add some detail to our SCX10, with parts supplied in the RTR box. In the plastic parts bag that comes packed in the RTR box you will find a molded plastic fuel filler cap.

Installing the fuel cap, and other scale details, will be easier with the roll cage removed.

Using a 2mm driver remove the eight screws that hold the cage to the body.

Now set the fuel cap in place on the tank to sort out exact placement. I am going to mount it centered left to right on the fuel cell, and slightly closer to the rear of the gas tank.

I measured the overall distance between the molded studs on the bottom of the fuel cap. These stud help hold the cap assembly in place, and you will need to drill clearance holes for them in the fuel cell.

Now, using my calipers again, I measured the overall width of the center section on the fuel cell to find center.

Cut your previous fuel cell dimension in half and mark the center point with a marker.

Our spread on the molded studs from the fuel cap assembly was about .600 of an inch. Cut that in half and you get .300 of an inch from the stud to the mounting hole in the center of the fuel cap. Measure .300 out from the mark on the center of your fuel cell to get your drill points. Mark those points with a marker and drill them out with a body reamer.

Take your time when drilling / reaming the holes. Make sure you test fit the fuel cap assembly as you go. Once everything fits properly, you can move on to the next step.

Before we bolt the cap assembly into place, I will add the officially licensed Fuel Safe fuel cell sticker included in the RTR box.

Using an X-acto gently trim away the small pieces of the fuel cell sticker covering the body mounting, and fuel cap mounting holes.

Insert the fuel cap assembly into place on the fuel cell and secure with a short M3 screw. I used a shorty plastic self tapping screw to tie the cap to the tank. If you don’t have a really short screw, you can use something longer if you have a spacers to take up the extra slack. The screw I found was slightly longer than needed, so I used an old SCX10 shock piston as a spacer.

All done!

Next we will add a few more interior details, with decals that are supplied with the RTR. Remove the molded plastic gear shifter located between the front seats.

Located the interior decals on the sticker sheet.

Apply the decals to the center console and arm rest.

Use an X-acto to cut the mounting holes for the shifter.

Bolt the shifter back in place.

The sticker sheet even includes a Jeep decal for the center of the steering wheel.

Last thing we will add is the exterior hinge stickers for the doors and the rear tailgate.

Now we can bolt the roll cage back onto the body.

Close-up shots of added details.

Stay tuned for more……