Brandon’s Wraith – Now with Vanquish Currie Rock Jock Axles

The Vanquish fairy showed up last week and dropped these off on my desk.  My Wraith is finally getting some Currie goodness! My driver is very excited of course… Out with the old, they served me well. Thankfully BENDER already did a complete how-to blog post for the assembly of the new Vanquish Currie Rock Jock axles here: http://www.axialracing.com/blog_posts/1073903525 So I will go ahead and skip to the images of the assembled axles. The front of my Wraith, stripped and ready. Front axle installed.  My driver’s smile seems bigger? Rear axle installed. Finished! My driver’s smile just keeps growing. Thanks for looking!  My driver appreciates it.

Brandon’s Axial EXO RTR Terra Buggy goes Baja Bug!

The Axial EXO Terra Buggy stands out due is its unique looks and construction.  The integrated cage and multi-piece body seperates it from the norm, eliminating the standard body posts and bouncy lexan body found on most RC’s.  So what do you do when you feel the need to change the look of your EXO Terra Buggy?

First thing I did was find some inspiration.  While surfing the classified’s section on race-dezert I came across this heavily built VW Bug with an LS1 out back.  Perfect!  The EXO Terra Buggy is also V8 powered thanks to Turnkey.

Browsing Pro-Line’s website I found quite a few Baja Bug bodies.  After talking with them it looked like the Volkswagen Baja Bug Body 3283-62 was the best fit.

A few days later the fun began!  A quick trim and mock-up showed that this project had some potential. I started the build on my EXO Kit, so excuse its rough looks.

Some more trimming, fitting, and head scratching resulted in the following:

I immediately knew this body needed something to top it off…  How about Axial’s Universal Light Bar?  Part number: AX30709

Decision on the paint scheme was easy.  I know this is a VW and not a Toyota, but I couldn’t resist.

To finish off the lighting I installed a pair of the small round buckets included on the Axial Light Bucket Set.  Part Number: AX80045

Now for the fun part.  My AX90024 Axial EXO Terra Buggy RTR is still fresh and right out of the box.  Let the modifications begin.  With the body already trimmed to fit and the basic modifications required already laid out this was an easy build!

First things first, I removed those awesome green body panels. The rear wing was also removed for now.  Still undecided on the look with/without the wing.

Because the hood of the VW body is longer I had to look at finding a way to move the front bumper out of the way.  So for now I simply removed the bumper brace.  Add that to the pile of removed parts…

I also wanted to give this build more of a long travel stance.  Out of the box the EXO sets at about mid travel for ideal handling.  I decided to use some longer rear springs in the front to achieve the look I am after.  Some 14x70mm Firms did the trick.  Part Number: AX30221.

New longer springs vs. the stock front springs.  Both are Firm (Yellow) Springs.

End result, the new front stance.

To mount the VW baja body I decided to avoid using the existing hardware that was used to mount the EXO Terra Buggy body.  Instead I fabricated some body mounts.  Lots of ways to do this but here are the parts and placement I decided to go with.

I picked up some some threaded posts.  They were included with Traxxas TRA3727A.  The simply threaded into the existing hole that held down the old hood.

I also trimmed the hood mounts on the front to allow the body to sit as low as possible.  The two mounts circled in red were cut flush.

For the rear body mounts I dug through the parts box.  These started life as AX10 body mounts.  Part number: AX80005

I simply cut them to the required length and drilled a new hole in them.

Once my cut was cleaned up and I confirmed the length I used the existing holes on the EXO cage (where the original body mounts).  I used some M3x15mm Tapping Buttonheads that used to hold on the bumper compression brace.  Perfect length for this, and a great way to re-use parts from the “removed” pile.

The end result looks factory.  I even have some adjustment left to fine tune the fitment of the VW Baja Bug Body.

Next I decided to remove the rear light bezel.  The roof of the VW Baja Bug body will cover this, and removing this allowed me to get the body to set at the desired height.  Plus this gives me easy access to install the radiator.  Note: It is possible to remove the light bezel without removing the cage, I used an Axial 2.0mm ball driver.  Axial Part Number: AX20021

Guess what is included in the spare parts bag of the Axial EXO Terra Buggy RTR?  How about an officially licensed Griffin Radiator.  Score!

This parts tree is available separately as well.  Its a great accessory for your SCX10 or Wraith.  Part Number: AX80103

I decided to cut the radiator off and lay down some silver paint for scale realism.

Radiator assembly and installation.

Did you catch that additional parts tree with rod ends I showed in the picture of the radiator?  They provided a perfect solution for adjusting the position of the front bumper to fit the VW body.  I picked up some M3x25mm threaded turnbuckles, Part Number: AXA1633 to complete the assembly of the links. The following screws and nuts were used to mount the assembled links to the bumper and bulkhead:

M3x45mm Cap head.  Part Number: AXA0094
M3x18mm Button head.  Part Number: AXA118
M3 Thin Nylon Lock Nuts.  Part Number: AXA1052

Installed:

One thing I really liked about the 1:1 inspiration was the overall width and stance.  I decided to mimic this look by simply installing some front wheels and tires on the back of the EXO.  The EXO Terra Buggy comes with narrow front wheels/tires and standard rear wheels/tires.  To match the narrow wheels/tires on all 4 corners I needed the following parts:

2.2 3.0 Raceline Renegade Wheels – 34mm (Chrome/Black) Part Number: AX08106
2.2 3.0 Hankook Dynapro Mud Terrain Tires 34mm Part Number: AX120107

Getting close!!

Here is my final pile of removed parts.  Looks like my EXO Kit gets some fresh body panels and a new wing now!

Here is a shot of the cutouts on the hood to clear the shocks.  Also note the cutouts for the front bumper, this wasn’t necessary but I didn’t want to take away too much clearance from the front by pushing the bumper any further forward.

Hmm, something is missing back here.

Ahhh, my Turnkey V8!  Axial Part Number: AX04031

This also includes the seats and dash, I’m saving that for a potential part 2 of this build.

Trimmed, painted, and stickers applied.  Too easy!  My EXO RTR should be much faster now…

Install time, simply remove the 2 button head tapping screws holding on the center brace from each side and it comes right out. (4 Screws total)

I grabbed 4 of the M2.6 button heads that held all the original green body panels to the cage.  These will be used again to mount the motor.

Once mounted it simply slides into place.  The detail of the motor and radiator should definitely make this VW Baja Build stand out.

Ready for it?!?

The completed build is definitely very unique.  It was surprisingly simple to do as well!  The EXO Terra Buggy platform has a ton of potential for scale builds and replica’s.  Already brainstorming the next EXO based project, hope you enjoyed this one.

Axial Visits ICON Vehicle Dynamics

You have probably noticed a lot more full size off-road company names featured on Axial vehicles as of late. These names are not just another marketing ploy, but instead relationships that Axial has developed to bring you the best products we can. We all know that R/C vehicles are scale representations of full size vehicles, so isn’t it natural that Axial would want to work with full size companies to make their products as accurate as possible? There are obviously components that can not be made to scale, due to the abuse that an R/C vehicle will see, which is way more intense than a full size rig would endure. Take an R/C car and let it tubmle off a 10′ rock, which would be scaled to a 100′ rock in full scale, where a full size vehicle would be literally totaled and made into scrap metal; your Axial rig keeps on ticking. So as you can imagine, not all components scale out just right. The theory however, when it comes to suspension geometry and suspension tuning crosses over extremely well. The Axial staff recently ventured out to Riverside, California to have a technical chat with Dylan Evans and company at ICON Vehicle Dynamics so I tagged along to bring you the scoop!

ICON Vehicle Dynamics is a very unique company staffed with some of the most talented suspension development experts in the nation. Headed up by SCORE off road racing champion Dylan Evans, who also knows rock crawling through his membership of the Poly Goats Four Wheel Drive Club of Cal Poly SLO; Evans and company know a thing or two about how to deal with rough terrain at all speeds. As the name implies, this company focuses on the unique characteristics of each vehicles dynamics (forces causing motion), and how to improve that vehicles ability to tackle rough terrain while significantly improving ride quality.

ICON Vehicle Dynamics is further unique due to their manufacturing process, which all takes place “in house” at their Riverside, Ca facility. The ICON Vehicle Dynamics philosophy demands the use of the highest quality raw materials available, construct the products in the USA and deliver to the consumer the best mix of top-shelf product and customer service. This philosophy has made ICON Vehicle Dynamics stand out in a sea of aftermarket companies and has them labelled as the place to go if you demand the best available.

Cool ICON Decal!

Here is a short video they have as an introductory to their company, check it out!

We started out our visit with ICON Vehicle Dynamics in their large meeting room, where we met with the marketing staff, the general manager, and the engineering staff. This gave both companies an opportunity to discuss the similarities between the two companies. It is amazing how we share the same customers and the same passion for the off road lifestyle

After the meeting, we were off to the warehouse and shop area to check out where the magic happens. I made a few pit stops on the way out of the offices to snap a few pictures of some cool stuff I saw laying around.

Very high tech Bypass shock for off-road racing

Our Axial EXO proudly on display!

The SCX10 Honcho articulated in the office

The line-up of Axial vehicles featuring ICON branding

I decided to peak out the windows from the upstairs office and sneak a few shots of the facility from a bird’s eye view.
Check out all those CnC machines!!

Our shop tour started in the warehouse where they house some of the stock, getting ready to be shipped out, It was amazing to see how many different products they stock, and to hear about how the shelves get refilled almost every day as product is shipped out.

The manufacturing side is what really had us drooling! These guys make some really impressive components.

Everything about ICON Vehicle Dynamics, from their design process, to the manufacturing all the way to packaging, is top notch! We were really looking forward to checking out the shock department, as these guys are known for mastering the ride quality as well as performance.

shock shafts for days!!

Bypass shock bodies freshly welded

Mounting sets ready for assembly

Resivoirs ready to be added

Here is Dylan discussing shock tuning with Axial’s Jeff Johns, Matt Kearney, Brandon Coonce and Jamie Seymour.

Not sure if you caught our blog on the SCX10JK where we installed the ICON suspension system (If not click here to read it), but we were running and testing some of their compression clicker shocks. We figured since we were here, we should go ahead and remove them to see how they were doing, as well as make a slight valving adjustment. We pulled the SCX10JK up in the shop, and Adrian (shock building master) got to work.

The first step was to remove all of the shocks

Once the shocks were off of the vehicle, Adrian set up the shock dyno, yes I said shock dyno! This is where these guys take technology to the next level to put their experience into scientific numbers.

The numbers from the shock are then placed on a graph in real time on a computer screen

The objective of the change was to make the shocks 25% lighter on the compression valving to make the clickers more effective through their range of adjustment. We found that the SCX10JK never went above 6-clicks even in the harshest of terrain. We had the pleasure of watching Dylan and Adrian work their magic on the Dyno and out in the shop as they dissassembled and re-assembled the shocks for the adjustments. We will let the pictures tell most of the story…

The shock pistons look quite a lot different than the average R/C shock piston. These pistons have valve shims that are designed to flex out of the way of piston holes to let fluid pass. The one unique feature of full size ICON shocks is their very drastic difference in tunability between compression and rebound settings. Were we would normally make changes in the R/C world with oil viscosity, these guys make changes with shims. They have been doing it long enough to know what shim stack will make the desired change, and only have to tear them down once and get it dialed in perfect!

The seal heads are similar to the R/C versions, here is a cut away version of the ICON seal head

Once the shocks are completely reassembled, it’s back to the dyno for a comparison check from the original numbers

Dylan fires up the dyno and then checks the graph on the lap top and confirms they are good to go!

While Adrian re-installs the shocks on the SCX10JK, Dylan, Brandon and Matt discuss some of the suspension tuning Dylan has been doing on his Axial EXO and Wraith. Dylan is also an R/C enthusiast and really gets into the deep technical theory conversation with Matt and Brandon.

It was extremely cool to be a fly on the wall while the head of R&D from both of these companies exchange theories and ideas. It will be very interesting to see where this corroboration leads in the future. One thing for sure, with Partners like ICON Vehicle Dynamics, there will not be an issue gathering insight into the full size world when developing the next Axial vehicles.

Thank you Dylan and Crew at Icon Vehicle Dynamics, we appreciate your hospitality, and look forward to future visits!

Please check out ICON Vehicle Dynamics on the web here.

 

Story by: Recce01
Photos: GCRad1

 

Axialfest 2012 Recap

The first annual Axialfest was held this past weekend, June 22 – 24th, in Cisco Grove, CA. This event was known in the past as the “Axial West Coast Championships”, aka AWCC. This year’s event was geared towards “scale adventure” more so than a full on “competition”. While there are many classes to run, and trophies to win, this year’s event had a little different format to it, by offering numerous scale classes to compete in. Brian Parker’s new competition format known as “G6″ is slowly taking  the country by storm. Parker and his group of Recon Crawlers set out to make this event all about driving your scale R/C truck on lengthy adventures. When I say lengthy adventures, I mean it. For example the first stage of the G6 challenge on Friday consisted of navigating 500 gates that were sporadically laid out in the woods surrounding Cisco Grove Campground, the base camp of our adventures for the weekend. These 500 gates are numbered and must be run in consecutive order. Sounds simple enough right? Well, it can be, if you can locate all the gates. Brain and his crew can be pretty creative when it comes to setting courses, and camouflaging gates. And keep in mind there are 3 stages to this G6 challenge, so 500 gates is only part of the 3 day adventure. In the end I believe some adventurists in attendance ran in excess of 1200 gates throughout the weekend. Here’s a run down from the event.

Axial base camp.

The mud pit, which would be used throughout the weekend.

 

Registration on Friday morning.

 

The Terra Cross track.

 

Competitors line up according to class for the start.

 

Brian Parker holds the driver’s meeting before releasing competitors out onto the course.

 

On to the action. A cool Crawlmaro replica made with a Wraith.

 

Brett Carlson from Bulu Productions made the trip down from Oregon to shoot a little video, as well as compete with his Wraith.

 

Driving out of a rollover will save time and penalty points if you don’t have a winch.

 

One of the challenges that had to be performed on this stage was a sled pull.

 

Here you can see the mud depth is keep scale for realism.

 

Teamwork is another key factor to making through all 500 gates. Competitors are allowed to help each other over obstacles if need be.

 

The start of day two’s Ultra Race. This was a class that required you to run the set course as fast as you can. If you are looking for a good fun cardio workout, this is the class for you.

 

The first turn was a bottle neck for the more densely populated classes.

 

Axial’s own Brandon Coonce took the holshot in his custom blue paneled Wraith.

 

Next class hits the ground running. This was the adventurist class if I remember right. This class wasn’t about speed, it was more about adventure. But, a quick start to get ahead of the competition is still a good idea until the group gets spread out on course.

 

Turn one mayhem.

 

Next class to depart for the starting area.

 

Turn one was a great vantage point again.

 

Ty Campbell from Tekin’s custom Wraith build hits the mud pit flying.

 

More turn one action.

 

Not very often you see a Gremlin sporting 54″ tires.

 

After all the classes got underway, I set out on foot with my camera to see what challenges lay ahead for our competitors. First driver I came across was my co-worker Brandon. He had a weird monstrosity strapped to the hood of his Wraith. I asked him as he went by what it was, and all I heard was something about a boat? Confused, I followed him up the trail for a bit until he hit a challenge section of the trail run. This challenge required those carrying kayaks or boats on their vehicles to launch their boats at the designated boat ramp, let the vessel float its way downstream to the designated pick-up zone, then recover your boat and load it back onto your rig before you continue on. Actually turned out to be very entertaining to watch, some boats sank in the “rapids” requiring the owner to tip toe their way out into the stream for a recovery. Here is where Brandon’s previously mentioned monstrosity/camp fabbed raft came into play. Constructed of a 2.2 Ripsaw tire, stock tire foam, Proline roof rack, Proline cooler and a little duct tape, this raft floated down the scale river like a champ!! Everyone was laughing as it floated by us.

 

A few other watercraft making their way downstream.

 

After completing a few hundred gates the trail leads the competitors back to base camp for a run through the mud pit.

 

Cupid’s set-up is looking pretty high-tech these days, he is now apparently sporting a compound bow!!

 

Meanwhile back at our campsite our XR10′s are still covered in shaving cream from the previous night’s “Rock Riot” event. It’s a long story………. click the link below the photo.

A little video of Brandon and I hitting the shaving cream pit first. Brandon had the honors of breaking trail, I am second. Listen to Parker laughing as we go through.

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=474854405861643

 

Our guard dog watched over the Axial RV while we were away.

 

One of my favorite scale vehicles from the weekend.

 

A few random campsites that were set-up properly for the disco themed weekend.

 

Time for some Terra Cross action. The TC races had a little something for everyone. There were classes for the SCX10, Wraith and EXO. Each class had its own variation of the track to run. This was one of the highlights of the weekend for me. It was the definition of backyard racing!!

First up for the heat races were the SCX10s.

 

Next up, the Wraith class.

 

And the EXO heat races were last.

 

Winner of the SCX10 Terra Cross Race was Matt Soileau

 

Start of the Wraith finals.

 

Taking the first Wraith Terra Cross victory was Axial team driver Ryan Gerrish.

 

Start of the EXO finals

 

Steve Brown of Vanquish Products tries to get his RTR EXO out of Ty Campbell’s way. Ty was by far the fastest guy on the track.

 

After all the dust settled, Ty Campbell took the win in the EXO Terra Cross.

 

Congrats to all the winners, you guys earned it! Here are a few highlights from the awards ceremony.

 

The future of our sport.

 

The Hawaii club sent this autographed banner to the event with signatures from the Hawaii G6 thanking Axial for their support. Thanks guys!!

That wraps up the 2012 Axialfestivies. If you can find a way to attend one of these G6 events you won’t be disappointed, especially if you own a scale R/C truck. Don’t forget to pack spare batteries either, because you are going to need them.

EXO Terra Buggy Build Tips: Motor Mount

The Axial EXO Terra buggy includes a very unique motor mount.  The adjustable mesh screw and the dovetail groove are both unique designs for ease of adjustment and maximum holding strength with minimal effort.

Lets go over the basic installation and assembly of the motor mount.

Step 1: With the motor mounted onto the slide use this screw to adjust your mesh.  You can slowly adjust the mesh as you tighten or loosen this screw, once set you will be able to remove the slide with the motor attached and install it again into the same exact position. Use a 2.5mm allen driver for this adjustment screw.

Step 2: Once the mesh is set install the M4 set screw in the top of the motor mount.  Do not tighten this screw all the way down yet.  Use a 2.0mm allen driver here.

Step 3: Continue tightening this set screw, you will feel the screw stop once it hits the motor mount slide shown by the green arrow on the step 3 image above.

Step 4: Once the screw has touched the motor mount slide you only need to turn it another 1/4 turn.  Or 90*.  This will snug up quickly and lock the motor slide into place.  Over tightening this set screw will cause damage to the motor mount or the motor mount slide.  1/4 turn is all you need here.

DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN THE M4 SETSCREW!  YOU WILL DAMAGE THE MOTOR MOUNT.

Here is an image from Step 22 in the EXO Kit manual.  You will see the slide attached to the motor, and the motor mount attached to the chassis.

**Worried that the extra 1/4 turn past snug isn’t enough?  Here is why it works.

The Motor Mount has a male dovetail, while the motor slide that the motor mount attaches to has a female dovetail.  When the M4 setscrew is tightened you are not only applying pressure to the point of the set screw, but also to the entire surface of that dovetail.  This increased surface area means you have that much more material holding the motor slide into place. Trust the surface area! Over tightening the set screw will actually decrease this surface area and potentially break the mount. AGAIN, DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN!

Here is an image of the added surfaces from the dovetail.  This is holding the motor mount slide into place.  Keep in mind these surfaces are on the front and back.

Brandon’s Formula Offroad Build: Part 3: Insight into the AR60 Axle Design

See Part 2 of the build HERE.
See Part 1 of the build HERE.

Wanted to share the latest updates to my Formula Offroad build. When I first built this rig using AX10 axles the Wraith™ had just hit the market. At the time I thought it would be great to have those new AR60 axles found in the Wraith™ underneath my Formula Offroad rig. Well its been long enough, time to get it done!

But first, I will explain a few of the advantages of the AR60 axles for this application.

Axial R&D developed the new AR60 axles for a few reason’s. First, we wanted the Wraith™ to perform well at higher speeds. Speed isn’t all about straight line performance, stability is important as well. The AX10 axles with some wideners would not have cut it. To increase handling ability at speeds we needed to utilize a design with proper scrub radius. So what is Scrub radius and why is it so important for handling? Scrub Radius is determined by the kingpin location on the steering knuckles and hubs. Draw an imaginary line to the ground through the kingpin screws and ideally that imaginary line lands close to the center of the tire to achieve the ideal scrub radius.

Ideal, or zero scrub radius occurs when the kingpin line meets the ground at the center of the tire.

Here is a pic I found to help explain Scrub Radius (aka pivot angle radius):

Now lets take a look at the AR60 axle by drawing a similar diagram.

The Blue line is the imaginary line I mentioned above. The screws this imaginary line travels through are the kingpin screws. The red “X” at the bottom of the tire is the location that the kingpin line meets the ground. You can see this very close to the center of the tire therefore the scrub radius is minimal.

On 1:1 cars you want this scrub radius to be as close to zero as possible. Vehicles with a large scrub radius require powerful steering systems to move the tire when steering. Cars with zero scrub radius can usually be driven without power steering. So this brings us to another important reason to reduce scrub radius. The larger the scrub radius the higher the torque required to steer it, therefore you need a stronger steering servo on your RC car. Keeping the scrub radius to a minimum will let your steering servo work at its full potential and use the steering torque efficiently.

Lets look at my old setup using the AX10 axles and a wide offset wheel to achieve the width I wanted. Keep in mind that this is extreme due to the wheels I was using. Axial’s current products that utilize the AX10 axle do not exhibit this large scrub radius.

Here you can see the distance from the center of the tire where it meets the ground is a good distance away from the red X. This creates a very large scrub radius.

There are few other important things to note when looking at the comparisons above. See how the imaginary line through the kingpin screws is at an incline on the AR60 axle? This is due to the inclined kingpin screws compared to the vertical kingpin screws on the AX10 axles. This inclined kingpin design was originally used on the XR10 competition Rock Crawler. It effectively moves the imaginary line closer to the center of the tire. The extra width of the AR60 axle and the incline kingpin angle both work together to increase handling, stability, and steering efficiency.

When Axial R&D started looking into Kingpin Inclination during the design of the XR10 competition Rock Crawler we found that the 1:1 automotive industry settled on an inclined kingpin angle of 7-9 degrees. Anything more and the contact patch of the tire is decreased during steering. The XR10 and AR60 axles utilize 8 degrees of kingpin inclination.

Another example of kingpin inclination can be seen on a Dana 44 Axle, its always cool to see real world 1:1 technology trickle down into the RC industry.

The second major design focus on the AR60 axles was strength. The Wraith™ was designed to handle more more speed and larger tires than any previous Axial product. The AR60 axle utilizes a 1 piece molded axle housing with thicker axle tubes. By removing the seam of the 2 piece axle housing and increasing the thickness the strength increase is substantial.

The third major design focus of the AR60 axle was adjustability. Some key adjustable features include:

  • The AR60 axle can easily be flipped for a left or right offset pumpkin. The offset pumpkin allows for more clearance under a larger area of the axle and properly aligns the axle output with the transmission output to create a more efficient drivetrain.
  • The lower link/shock mounts can be flipped to adjust height and anti-squat.
  • Remove the diff cover and you can access the ring and pinion. Again this can also be flipped to keep the same rotation when you flip the axle housing to change the offset of the pumpkin.
  • Caster angle can be changed in 18* increments to drastically change driving/handling characteristics.
  • Upper 4 link truss is designed to be modular and act as a true truss to stiffen the axle housing.

Here is a exploded view showing the removal of the ring gear. Again Axial R&D took inspiration from 1:1 axles and the accessibility of the ring & pinion. It never gets old having to tear into an AR60 axle, its just too cool the way it comes apart and the diff cover gives you access to the axle internals.

Flipping the axles is also very easy. For this part of my Formula Offroad build I opted to install them flipped when compared to the Wraith. This was done to keep the transmission in the same orientation. If the AR60 axles did not have the capability to easily be flipped I would have been forced to rethink my whole build. The current transmission position allows me to run a full size 2 or 3S lipo pack under the hood. Once the axles were flipped all I had to do was flip the differentials inside the axle to correct the rotation. This extra adjustment is a great feature for changing the rotation to accommodate electronics or fighting torque twist.

Along with flipping the axles, the lower link/shock mounts can be flipped to further fine tune the suspension. Anti-squat characteristics are determined by the location of the links at the chassis and the axle. Triangulation and link separation is key when setting up a 4 link suspension, the AR60 axles give you that extra adjustability needed with the lower link mounts. Take a look at the image below, the green line running through the center of the axle helps to show the difference when the link mounts are flipped (link mounts shown in blue). If you need to replace a lower link mount its an easy part to change out that does not require the entire AR60 axle housing to be replaced. Axial also sells a machined aluminum lower link mount AX30830.

Here are a few initial build pictures of the AR60 axles underneath my Formula Offroad rig. Because this is a custom build I did have to make some slight adjustments to bolt on the AR60 axles and still utilize the full stroke of the shocks without interfering. I will update this post with some more detailed photos soon.

I also opted to upgrade the driveshafts to the new AX30794 WB8 versions. The new WB8 driveshafts utilize a CV style joint that is rebuild-able.

The wheels are the new Axial 2.2/3.0 Narrow Raceline Renegade for the EXO Terra Buggy. Tires are Pro-Line SC Slingshots.

More build pics coming soon! Also need to get some electronics sorted out. Stay tuned, thanks for looking!

Not sure what Formula Offroad RC’s are all about? Check out the RCCrawler.com Formula Offroad Forum HERE

Want to see a FOFF RC in action? Check out Bender’s video HERE

AWCC 2011 WINNERS

AWCC FINALS 2011 2.2 PRO COMP CHAMPIONS:
First Place Brian Lorenz, Second Place Brad Dumont, Third Place Don French

AWCC FINALS 2011 2.2 PRO COMP CHAMPIONS Brian Lorenz, Brad Dumont, Don French
First Place [center] Brian “BURBO” Lorenz
Second Place [right] Brad “Bender” Dumont
Third Place [left] Don French

AWCC FINALS 2011 2.2 SPORT COMP CHAMPIONS:
First Place Spencer French, Second Place Chris McMullin, Third Place Mike Boling

AWCC FINALS 2011 2.2 SPORT COMP CHAMPIONS Spencer French, Chris McMullin, Mike Boling
First Place [center] Spencer French
Second Place [right] Chris McMullin
Third Place [left] Mike Boling

Axial SCX10 Recon G6 Challenge 1.9 Scale Winners:
First Place Thom Kowatch, Second Place John Ripplinger, Third Place Andy Berryman

Axial SCX10 Recon G6 Challenge Winners: Thom Kowatch, John Ripplinger, Andy Berryman
First Place [center] Thom Kowatch
Second Place [right] John Ripplinger
Third Place [left] Andy Berryman

Axial SCX10 Recon G6 Challenge 2.2 Scale Winners:
First Place Justin Halbohm, Second Place Brandon Coonce, Third Place Wesley Klein

Axial SCX10 Recon G6 Challenge 2.2 Scale Winners: Justin Halbohm, Brandon Coonce, Wesley Klein
First Place [right] Justin “J-FAB” Halbohm
Second Place [center] Brandon Coonce not present [Brian Parker standing in]
Third Place [left] Wesley “Sloyota” Klein

AXIAL West Coast Championships – OFFICIAL JUDGES TEAM
AXIAL West Coast Championships - AWCC FINALS 2011 Cisco Grove, CA JUDGES TEAM
These guys are all winners in our book!

Ryan Gerrish recipient of the G-Degree Award at Axial SCX10 Recon G6 Scale Challenge

The G-Degree Award is given to the challenger who received some bad luck while out on trail from the adventure gods as they make us walk back with our rigs in a critically non-operational state. Our buddy Ryan gets a little life-support from Brian Parker, the AWCC 2011 Master of Ceremonies.

AWCC FINALS 2011 2.2 PRO COMP CHAMPION Brian “BURBO” Lorenz
AWCC FINALS 2011 2.2 PRO COMP CHAMPION Brian "BURBO" Lorenz
Brian “BURBO” Lorenz of the Backyard Boyz came to Cisco Grove and laid down rubber to rock and took home the metal.


How the West was won…. Axial XR10 in the hands of Brian “BURBO” Lorenz

Brandon’s SCX10 Unimog Build

Mercedes Unimogs

I have a fascination with Unimogs, these seemingly unstable and over sized trucks.  The places they can go and terrain they are capable of traversing is incredible.  Not to mention how cool they look when you see one out on the trail or even the streets.

I had the opportunity to pick up one of these Unimog 406 bodies from a friend of mine and I started planning a build using the SCX10 Dingo RTR as my starting platform.

First thing I did was paint the body.  I took some random shrubbery  and mixed paint to create a scale camo paint scheme on the outside of the body.  The inside of the body is painted rust and backed with black.  Hopefully it wears well after some good use.

I also made a custom light bar using some parts from the new Axial Wraith AX90018.  The locations to mount two outside lights were already there, all I had to do was add a the 3 middle lights.  Axial’s Simple LED system from the Dingo along with a new 5 LED string powers this light bar.  I used the oval fog lights from the AX80045 Light bucket sets.  To finish off the body I installed a snorkel that I had in my random box of scale goodies.

The Dingo Chassis was modified slightly.  I cut about 1.25″ off the back of the frame and shortened the rear wheelbase about0.25″.  The front suspension received a Hand Bros CMS kit.  The factory shocks were replaced with a set of Pro-Line Scale shocks.  All the original Dingo bumpers and rock sliders were removed. A Futaba S9156 handles the steering duties, with 300+ oz/in it should be more than enough.  The front bumper was kept very simple, just a piece of 1/8″ rectangle stock and 1/4″ round steel brazed together and bolted on.  I also installed a fair-lead that is recessed to keep it from getting too banged up.

The Dingo chassis also received the following Axial Option Parts:

AX30549 Aluminum links pack

AX30495 & AX30496 Aluminum C Hubs and Steering Knuckles

AX30464 Universal Set

Next I started on the rear cage structure.  I wanted to keep it as simple as possible and my main goal was to hide the transmission.  The cage also has some diamond plate styrene integrated into it for the flatbed section and transmission cover.  The finished cage received a coat of black paint and a waterproof receiver box from the AX90018 Wraith.

With the new rear cage/flat-bed installed I got everything wired up.  The box on the rear between the shock towers holds a Tekin FXR.  I also moved the Axial battery plate and mounted it perpendicular to the chassis and as low as I could get it without interfering with the Drive shaft.  This allows me to run a very high capacity 2S or 3S lipo.  My battery of choice is the MaxAmps 2S 6500mah LiPo.

Final assembly required some custom front body mounts.  The upper body mounts are integrated into the top bar of the rear cage and the front body mounts are shifted forward with a piece of bent aluminum stock (this will give me a good foundation for the interior in the future as well).

Cant forget the spare tire and tie downs!  Made from the wife’s hair ties and paperclips.

Final Pics, for now at least.  Scale builds never really end ;)  Thank you Axial Marketing for the awesome photo’s.

First run!  Thank you HB_Crawler for posting the pictures on SoCalRCRC.

Brandon’s Formula Offroad Build: Part 2

Now the fun begins, testing and tuning before the final installment of my build!  If you missed Part 1 of my build be sure to check it out HERE.
Part 3 HERE.

With the rig running and ready to hit the sand, Bender and I headed out to our local spot where the road construction has created some interesting and difficult obstacles.

I now have about 12 packs through it and I know what needs to be changed/updated.  Electronics are still undecided, the weight of this rig is causing heat issues when I make adjustments for more wheel speed.  I will include my full build spec sheet and the electronics I decide on in Part 3.

For now enjoy the action shots, and be sure to click the images for the larger version or view the full gallery below!