Axial – The Official R/C vehicles of Ultra4 Racing – King of the Hammers 2014

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
(Irvine, CA) January 10, 2014.

Axial R/C Inc., A subsidiary of Hobbico Inc., is proud to announce Axial as the Official R/C Vehicles of Ultra4 / King of the Hammers for 2014.

Ultra4 Racing is the latest and greatest off road motorsport event on earth. This style of racing challenges man to a duel with the elements. Unlike standard off road racing in a stadium or in the wide open desert, Ultra4 vehicles face challenges that no other motorsport demands. Competitors are not only made to cross vast areas of open desert, they also travel up boulder strewn canyons and negotiate terrain that appears impassable. To compete in such a demanding environment, competitors build custom four wheel drive vehicles that are made to crawl over the harshest terrain, then conquer the wide open desert at exhilarating triple digit speeds. This element of automotive enthusiasm is precisely what Axial R/C has set out to deliver in 1:10 scale, so the relationship between Axial R/C and Ultra4 is a very natural fit.

Axial’s roots are directly tied to motorsports, especially competitive rock crawling. As full size competitive rock crawling transcended into what is now rock racing, the sport became globally recognized in a short five years, most notably the King of the Hammers [KOH] held annually in Johnson Valley, California. Axial followed suite with its own version of vehicles that translated well within this segment of the off road community. Axial has been very offroad lifestyle driven and fits perfectly with Ultra4 and the King of the Hammers event which is the mecca of enthusiasts pushing the boundaries of rock racing. Axial will be on site at the 2014 King of the Hammers offering enthusiasts an opportunity to experience the endless fun that these rock racing and trail navigating R/Cs have to offer.

On the Saturday following KOH [Feb 8th], there will be a radio controlled version of King of the Hammers as Axial hosts the RECON Ultra4 G6 at King of the Hammers.

Axial RECON Ultra4 G6 at King of the Hammers
When: Feb. 8 – 12:00 Noon
Where: (GPS- N34 24.927, W116 31.090) just west of Hammer Town at the base of the mountain.

R/C motorsports joins full size motorsports once again as Axial joins forces with Ultra4 / King of the Hammers. 2014 will once again see Axial bring the RECON G6 Series along for the full experience. Axial has teamed with full size motorsports in the past and is doing it again in Johnson Valley, Ca. ,on Saturday Feb. 8th, the day after the King of the Hammers main event. This is the last event on the 2014 KOH schedule starting at noon on Saturday, if you own an Axial R/C, come out and get your fix in this historic RECON Ultra4 G6. The RECON G6 series is made up of R/C endurance events featuring man and scale machine tackling the elements, a true test for your R/C vehicle with a major emphasis on a family fun atmosphere. The object is to conquer the course set forth by RECON G6 mastermind Brian Parker. For more information on this event, please click here.

About Axial
Founded in 2005, Axial R/C, Inc. has quickly became a global brand leader of hobby grade radio controlled products as Axial is a company of enthusiasts for enthusiasts. We manufacture chassis and accessory products predominantly for the Rock Crawling and Overland Adventure segments, with design emphasis on rugged construction and scale realism. Axial is regularly involved in local and national events which allow us to keep our finger on the pulse of R/C culture, thus earning us awards every year from 2007 through 2010, including “Best Truck”, “Most Innovative”, “Best Engineered Product of the Year”, and “People’s Choice.” For more information on Axial and Axial products please visit www.axialracing.comtwitter.com/axialracingfacebook.com/axialincyoutube.com/axialvideos

About Ultra4
Ultra4 Racing is the official website of Hammerking Productions. The founders of Hammerking are the force behind the toughest one-day off-road race on the planet: King of The Hammers. King of the Hammers takes place each year in February, on public lands in Johnson Valley, CA. The race has evolved from 12 teams racing for bragging rights and a case of beer, to more than 150 teams competing before thousands of fans both live and online. Due to the incredible success of King of the Hammers, Hammerking has created an equally difficult off-road endurance race called The Stampede which occurs annually in Reno, NV.

In addition to these races, Hammerking has established a racing class known as the Ultra4 class. The defining characteristic of this class is that all cars must be capable of 4-wheel drive. Beyond that, the class is unlimited, which means these cars come in all shapes and sizes and are capable of speeds over 100+ MPH and still contain gear ratios as low as 100 to 1 for technical rock crawling.

To give these cars and their drivers a chance to showcase their unique capabilities, Hammerking has formed the Ultra4 Racing series. The series challenges drivers to compete in a wide variety of terrain from endurance desert racing to competition-style rock crawls to short course racing. Hammerking currently produces five of the six races in the series on their own. The races take place on both public lands and in private motorsports parks across the country including: Exit 28 Motorsports Park in Nevada, Rausch Creek in Pennsylvania and Miller Motorsports Park in Utah.

Hammerking Productions has also produced three full-length feature films chronicling the first three King of the Hammers races. These award winning movies have helped shine a spotlight on this new form of racing throughout the world. Currently, fans are eagerly awaiting the release of Hammerking’s fourth production which will be coming to theaters and DVD by mid 2011.

If you would like to know more about Hammerking, Ultra4, the races produced and/or the movies created, please visit www.ultra4racing.comtwitter.com/Ultra4racingfacebook.com/Ultra4Racingyoutube.com/HeavyMetalConcepts

Contact:

Scott G.
Marketing – Special Projects
Axial R/C Inc.,
8 Goodyear, Suite 125
Irvine, CA 92618
email: scottg@axialracing.com
cell: 949-433-2189

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Full Option RTR SCX10 Jeep

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Axial offers several optional upgrade parts for the Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon RTR and Kit. Here’s a quick run down of what is installed and why you may want to use these items.

A couple photos of the completed full option build. Axial offers complete body kits for the Jeep, part number AX04035, that includes the clear Lexan body and all the scale accessories. We also offer just the replacement clear Jeep bodies as well, part number AX04033.

First option we will cover is Axial’s simple LED kit, part number AX24257. The simple LED kit comes with 4 white and 2 red LED lights to keep you running long after the sun goes down. I used two small light buckets from Axial’s Light Bucket Set, part number AX80045, and attached them to the front bumper mount with long M3 screws. I used Axial’s LED lens set, part number AX80049, to cover the LEDs front and rear for a more realistic look. The lens kit includes both clear and yellow lens covers to give users a couple options. Need even more light? Add our NVS system, part number AX24251, for the ultimate scale light system.

A couple shots of the rear LEDs with the clear lens covers in place.

Next option added was our new fully licensed Icon shocks, part number AX30103. These come standard in the Jeep kit, but are an option part for the RTR. These shocks feature a new and improved CNC machined shock piston for smoother action through the range of travel. The new Icon shocks also feature clear coated polished aluminum bodies, complete with aluminum faux reservoirs. The main body of the shock is threaded for quick ride height adjustments and pre-load tuning ability. Like their full size counterparts these shocks are completely rebuildable, tunable and offer consistent handling all while adding some of that Icon bling to your SCX10™ chassis.

Axial’s aluminum link kit, part number AX30550, for the SCX10™ was the next upgrade we added. Upgrade your stock plastic links to high quality aluminum. Aluminum links have less flex than the stock plastic links which helps your vehicle track straighter in all conditions. This link kit includes aluminum suspension and steering links, as well as all hardware and rod ends required to complete the conversion.

A shot of the steering links. If you just want to upgrade your steering links only Axial offers a steering upgrade kit, part number AX30426, as well. Upgrading your steering links to aluminum with improve steering response in all conditions, especially in hard binds associated with rock crawling. Another option part that can be seen here is Axial’s HD 25t aluminum servo horn, part number AX30836. Axial’s HD aluminum servo horn provides more responsive steering with less chance of stripping the internal splines over the stock plastic servo horn. Clamping style head for secure mounting in high stress applications. Available in 23, 24 and 25 tooth spline counts.

In this photo you can see a handful of upgrades to improve steering performance and increase the strength of the front axle. Aluminum knuckles, part number AX30496, aluminum knuckles help your vehicle track more consistently in all situations. Combine our knuckles with our aluminum C-hubs, part number AX30495, for the ultimate steering precision. Another option part installed here is Axial’s CVD’s, part number AX30464, for the SCX10™ axles. The CVD’s provide more steering throw that the stock dog bone set-up which is great for tight, technical trail runs. CVD’s also have less slop than the stock set-up for increased efficiency.

Moving on to the rear axle we installed our aluminum axle lockouts, part number AX30494. Axial’s aluminum axle lockouts are more rigid than the stock plastic lockouts, which will allow the vehicle to track better in all situations.

Axial’s HD motor plate was our next upgrade, part number AX30860. Our heavy duty motor plate is for any vehicle running our AX10 transmission. CNC machined from 4.5mm thick billet aluminum, with integrated heatsink fins to help motors run cooler on those all day expeditions. A must have for any R/C overland adventurist! Axial also offers 13T, 14T and 15T steel pinion gears and an 80T spur gear to give end users an array of gear ratios to choose from. Add more torque for low speed crawling to your SCX10™ by installing Axial’s 55T motor. Or if more speed is your thing, add Axial’s 20T motor for higher top speeds. Another option part that we installed here is Axial’s dig system for the Wraith transmission, part number AX30793. This conversion also requires use of our Wraith Dig Transmission Case, part number AX80051. Axial’s dig system allows you to lock the rear wheels, while powering the front wheels only for a tighter turning radius. Shift servo sold separately.

Next option part installed is Axial’s black 1.9 beadlock wheels. Beadlock wheels allow users to tune foam set-ups and change tires at will for varying terrain and conditions. We also added our 1.9 internal weight rings, part number AX30547, for some added weight up front which will help us on steep vertical climbs. You can adjust how much weight is in the front wheels by using our 1.9 wheel weight inserts, part number AX30548.

For tires we went with our 1.9 Maxxis Trepador, part number AX12019. These tires are fully licensed by Maxxis and are molded in Axial’s sticky R35 compound for the ultimate traction in any conditions.

Complete SCX10™ option parts list:
AX8087 – 1.9 Black Eight Hole Beadlock Wheels (x3 to have spare tire)
AX8088 – 1.9 Chrome Eight Hole Beadlock Wheel (x3 to have spare tire)
AX08138 – 1.9 Black Walker Evans Wheels (x3 to have spare tire)
AX12019 – 1.9 Maxxis Trepador Tires R35 Compound (x3 to have spare tire)
AX12016 – 1.9 Ripsaw Tire R35 Compound (x3 to have spare tire)
AX30547 – 1.9 Internal Weight Rings (x2)
AX30548 – 1.9 Wheel Weight Inserts (x3)
AX30549 – SCX10™ Aluminum Link Set (11.4″ wheelbase – Dingo)
AX30550 – SCX10™ Aluminum Link Set (12.3″ wheelbase – Honcho and Jeep)
AX30426 – SCX10™ Aluminum Steering Kit
AX30464 – SCX10™ Universal Axle Set
AX30395 – HD Ring and Pinion Gear Sets (stock gear ratio) (x2)
AX30401 – Overdrive HD Ring and Pinion Gear Sets (x2)
AX30402 – Underdrive HD Ring and Pinion Gear Sets (x2)
AX30786 – Aluminum WB8 Driveshaft Retainer Rings (x2)
AX30571 – 13t Steel Pinion Gear
AX30569 – 14t Steel Pinion Gear
AX30573 – 15t Steel Pinion Gear
AX30665 – 80t Spur Gear
AX30860 – HD Motor Plate
AX30834 – 23t HD Servo Horn
AX30835 – 24t HD Servo Horn
AX30836 – 25t HD Servo Horn
AX30494 – Aluminum Axle Lockouts
AX30495 – Aluminum Axle C-hub’s
AX30496 – Aluminum Knuckles
AX30103 – Icon Aluminum Shocks (x2)
AX30132 – Machined Shock Piston 7mm – 1.5×3 (4pcs)
AX24260 – AE-3 Vanguard ESC
AX24010 – Vanguard 2900KV Brushless Motor
AX24007 – 55 Turn Motor
AX24003 – 20 Turn Motor
AX24256 – 5 LED Light String
AX24257 – Simple LED Kit
AX24251 – NVS Light System
AX80045 – Light Bucket Set (x2)
AX80049 – LED Lens Set – Yellow / Clear (4pcs)
AX30793 – Dig Component Set
AX80051 – Dig Transmission Case
AX04033 – Clear Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon Body (Body only)
AX04035 – Complete Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon Body Kit
AX30200 – Red Springs 3.6 lbs/in (short) (x2)
AX30201 – White Springs 4.32 lbs/in (short) (x2)
AX30202 – Green Springs 5.44 lbs/in (short) (x2)
AX30203 – Yellow Springs 6.53 lbs/in (short) (x2)
AX30204 – Blue Springs 7.95 lbs/in (short) (x2)
AX30205 – Red Springs 2.7 lbs/in (long) (x2)
AX30206 – White Springs 3.6 lbs/in (long) (x2)
AX30207 – Green Springs 4.08 lbs/in (long) (x2)
AX30208 – Yellow Springs 5.44 lbs/in (long) (x2)
AX30209 – Blue Springs 6.81 lbs/in (long) (x2)

What is a RECON G6 ?

What is a RECON G6? If you have ever been to one of these events, the veterans will tell you, “It is whatever Parker wants it to be”. For those of you that are new and interested in these events, we take a look at the ins and outs of this revolutionary R/C scale event series.

RECON G6

2013 Rules & Guidelines

The RECON G6 is an r/c scale adventure that will test a driver’s ability and their r/c scalers capability. A driver will navigate their Axial vehicles through a stage marked with trail markers and perform mandatory skill sections and complete driver challenges along the way.

Goal: Finish all predetermined stages and complete all mandatory skill sections and driver challenges while maintaining a drivers log book and having fun.

Classes: There are several classes to choose from. A driver may only challenge themselves in more than one class if time allows and the second class is a different tire size. Each class will offer a driver different levels of fun with different challenges and guidelines.

-Adventurist 1.9 – This class is for drivers of 1.9 scale vehicles who enjoy a challenge. The Adventurist will demonstrate driving ability with more skill sections and more stage challenges and contend with the ever present break out time. This is the class for the driver who realizes that finishing the adventure is the goal. Drivers may use natural winch anchor points or be assisted by other Adventurists by a tow strap, winch, or another drivers shoe laces. The Adventurist may partner up with fellow Adventurist or several to experience the stage as a group and help each other reach the goal of finishing.

-Adventurist 2.2 – This Class is the same as the Adventurist 1.9 Class. Wraiths and Wronchos are at home in this class.

-Ultra 1.9 – This class is for drivers of 1.9 scale vehicles who take their scale challenge to the next level. An Ultra Driver will have to complete class specific stages and tasks and mandatory skill / driver challenges in the quickest time possible. This class is a more like a rally cross style stage with a quicker pace and more difficult mandatory challenges. Drivers of this class must use natural winch anchors points only or be helped from another Ultra Driver. Any outside assistance will result in a Stage DNF. There are no time restrictions for the Ultra Class Driver and a pee test for doping may not be mandatory, but highly recommended for any Ultra Class Driver who isn’t sweating.

-Ultra 2.2 – The same as the Ultra 1.9, except 2.2 tires are used.

-RECON G6 Teams – This Team Challenge is for 1.9 drivers who share one scale vehicle. This could be two friends or two family members that drive and maintain one scaler. Each team driver will be required to drive half of the total stage or any configuration of the stage as the Driver or Team Captain deems. If a stage is 200 trail markers, each driver will be responsible for driving half of the trail markers then handing the driving duties over to their teammate to complete the stage and finish. Keeping your vehicle together is part of the team challenge. While one team member is driving, the other will be their stage buddy. A Team driver may winch off their stage buddies shoe lace.

RECON G6 Scale Vehicle Requirements:

The rule of thumb here is simple; is it scale?

-Axial Vehicles or custom vehicles with Axial transmissions, Axial axles, Axial chassis or a significant amount of Axial products only.

-Your Axial based scale vehicle must be 1/10 car / truck with a scale chassis or custom tube scale chassis.

- Wheel sizes may be 1.55, 1.9, or 2.2, Tires that fit these wheels must be a licensed manufactured tire or knock offs. Tires must resemble the real thing and can only be siped or grooved. No other alterations may be made.

- A minimum of 5 scale items must be attached and remain attached to the vehicle. This may include mandatory scale items that may be used on stage for recoveries. The number of scale items may vary from event to event.

- A tow strap is mandatory on all vehicles at every event. A tow strap may be used to assist or recover other drivers on stage.

- All scale recovery items/tools, must be attached to the vehicle and after their use, be placed back on the vehicle. This includes sand ramps, tow straps, and hi-lift jacks. The only exception is lug wrench or nut driver. Real tools may be on the driver.

- All classes are allowed to use dig and 4 wheel steering on their scalers if they choose.

RECON G6 General Rules:

Rule #1 – NO HAND OF GOD. (HOG) A RECON G6 is all about driving. In keeping with the essence of the r/c scale scene a driver may not assist, stop, catch, or kick his/her vehicle. There are no penalties for electric winching or using your tow strap with help from another competitor or for reverses, so DRIVE SMART! The penalty is a DQ for hogging your scale vehicle. Performing on course repairs or having to touch your vehicle for recovery purposes is not hogging. Picking your vehicle up out of water, mud, sand, or rolling it over onto its wheels with your hand is all examples of hogging your vehicle, thus resulting in a disqualification. If this happens, log the HOG incident in your drivers log book and report it to G-Central.

Here is a brief video explaining this particular rule….

Rule #2 – A driver can not drive through a trail marker and reverse back through it to avoid trail obstacles. This will result in a DQ. A stage is directional and a driver must maintain the intended direction of travel. Reversing through the trail marker in the intended direction is ok and may be required during mandatory reverse skill sections.

Rule #3 – Mandatory skill sections are just that, MANDATORY! They will be located throughout a stage and will have an entrance and exit. There may or may not be a trail marker at a mandatory skill section. This does not mean you can bypass the section. Each class will have a mandatory skill section(s) and it will be marked with a class specific color boundary. A driver must drive their class mandatory skill section(s) only.

Rule #4 – HAVE FUN! The RECON G6 is the premier scale adventure event in the World. Each class has different parameters that must be met, but you are only cheating yourself out of one of the best experiences you will have with your r/c scaler by not driving with integrity and the willingness to perform each challenge in the spirit of scale r/c.

General Guidelines:

Stage Format:

- A RECON G6 Main Stage will consist of a stage. The stage will take a driver through various terrain conditions and return them to G-Central where a driver may pit for repairs, eat lunch, or full fill a mandatory pit stop. Some drivers may choose to continue on with the stage, but all vehicle break downs that happen on stage, must be repaired at the spot of the breakage or return to G-Central or their pit and make the needed repairs. Then they can return to the area of the break down and continue.

-Trail Markers [1 min+/-] – Trail Markers are numbered and different colors to mark the stage route and direction of travel. The red trail marker is always on a driver’s right and is the intended direction of travel through the trail marker. The left trail marker denotes the stage a driver is on. A driver may not straddle a trail marker. A driver must get all 4 tires through the trail marker. If a driver dislodges a trail marker or steps on a trail marker, that driver is responsible for putting that trail marker back in to position. All trail markers must be traveled through. Missing any trail marker will result in a DNF. Any trail marker hit or dislodged will result in 1 min penalty to be logged in the driver log book.

- Stage Boundaries [5 min+/-] – There are several types of stage boundaries. A sponsored stage boundary is a boundary that displays G6 sponsors and is the only boundary section of a stage that multiple drivers can be in at the same time. All other boundaries are one driver at a time inside the boundary. A Pink boundary is always a time bonus; whether it is a driving section or a driver task, pink = time bonus. Orange ribbon marks 1.9 mandatory skill sections. Yellow ribbon marks Ultra Drivers mandatory skill sections. Blue ribbon marks the Wraith and 2.2 skill sections. All of the above mentioned boundary markers, if touched by a driver’s vehicle is a penalty. If a pink ribbon is touched, no time bonus will be awarded and the driver must finish the section and mark his/her boundary penalty.

- Mandatory Skill Sections are marked with the appropriate boundary ribbon and must be driven. A mandatory skill section may be driving through mud, water, snow, sand, or a taco stand. A driver may be asked to drive up or down a steep grade, handle a tarmac track or hook up to a pull sled and attempt a full pull. A mandatory skill section is designed to test the driver’s ability and his/her vehicle’s capability.

-G-Tags [15 min+/-] – G-Tags are additional placards on a trail marker. Think of a G-Tag as a check point. G-Tags will be placed along a stage and will be in a specific order. A driver that misses a trail marker with a G-Tag will receive a time penalty.

Penalty Winch [3 Min+/-] In the case that there is not a competitor there to help you with a pull strap, or you do not have a working winch, then you may employ the penalty winch. The penalty winch is a scale tow strap, lanyard, or winch line that you would operate with your hand acting as another vehicle to extract your stuck rig. The idea is to act as though your hand is another vehicle and pull the stuck or rolled over vehicle out of its situation in a “scale manner”. You must mark the use of the penalty winch down in the driver’s log book. It is always best to use an onboard working electric winch, or use a tow strap with the assistance from another competitor. Use of either of these methods does not result in a penalty.


Once a penalty winch (self used tow strap) is employed, it will be necessary to mark this down in the G6 driver’s log book.

- Driver Log Book – RECON G6 works on the honor system. All Drivers will be on stage, driving at the same time. The driver log book must be maintained and the necessary information must be logged or the driver will receive a time penalty for an incomplete log book. G-Tags, boundaries, and time bonuses are examples of what a driver will track in their log book. Filling out your log book correctly and accuratly could result in a time bonus.

- Driver Challenges are tasks that the driver must complete. A driver never knows what he or she will have to do, but rest assured, it will provide spectators (and organizer, Brian Parker) entertainment. Some examples of past tasks have been hop scotch, airsoft target shooting, or reaching into a bucket of guts for a time bonus. Driver challenges are random, and come from the depths of Brian Parker’s brain.

- Stage Challenges have drivers keeping their eyes wide open for objects of desire. A stage challenge that a driver completes may net them a time bonus or even swag. These challenges often include picking up extra cargo along the route. Returning this cargo to G Central is rewarded.

- “Not Mandatory, but Highly Recommended”, is a phrase often used to describe an event specific task. As stated, these tasks are not mandatory, but highly recommended and would behoove a driver to participate in this task.

- Stage etiquette should be adhered to at all times. Make 3 attempts at a trail obstacle and then winch or receive assistance from a fellow G6’er. Drive smart. There is no penalty for winching or having a fellow G6’er assist you. Faster drivers have the right of way.

- All scale items must remain attached to the vehicle. If sand ramp has to be used, it has to be replaced back on the vehicle. The mandatory tow strap must start attached to the G-Ride. After its first use, a driver may keep it in his/her pocket. All other scale items must be replaced after they are used. The number of scale items may change depending on the G6. In addition, a specific scale item may be required. A driver must meet these changing requirements.

- Time Bonuses [5 min+/-] – There are two types of time bonuses that a driver can earn. First, a driving time bonus must be completed cleanly to earn. If a driver has to assist their vehicle in any way or a boundary marker is touched or crossed by the vehicle, no time bonus will be awarded and the section may or may not have to be completed before a driver can move on, even if this means winching out of the section or being pulled out by a fellow G6’er. The second is a driver’s challenge. A driver must successfully complete the task to earn the time bonus.

- Driver’s Meeting Challenge is an online challenge that a driver must successfully complete to receive a time bonus or swag at the driver’s meeting.

- Pit Repairs -[No Penalty] – Every G6’er knows that sooner or later, no matter how much preparation went into their G-Ride, something is going to break. In the G6 Challenge, any breakage that happens on stage, must be repaired then and there. If the repair cannot be made on stage, then a G6′er may make a Pit Repair. Naturally, a driver may find a flat spot near the breakage spot that is out of the way of fellow G6’ers, that is perfectly ok, but if a driver needs to make the repairs in the pit, they need to head straight to the pits. After the pit repair has been completed, the driver must return to the spot where they removed thier scaler from the stage and continue. There will be no penalty when a driver removes his/her scaler from the stage for a Pit Repair. A driver’s time will not stop for Pit Repairs. A driver must finish with the scaler that they started with. No switching of scalers, if a scaler cannot be repaired, the driver must immediately inform G-Central of their DNF.

Battery reccomendations- Every G6 event will be different, therefor the required battery power for each event will differ. The average G6 event will last 3 hours, so make sure you have the battery power needed to go the distance! Pay close attention to the G6 intel specific to the event to make sure you have the mAh to do the job. Do some homework to know the economy of your rig. You can count mAh rating on the battery versus your run time and know what you will need based upon the estimated time for the event.

RECON G6 brings pure adventure, but with all fun adventures, things are always changing. Drivers need to read the intel thoroughly, because each RECON G6 is different in one way or another and that will never change. Pay extra attention to the statement, “This is not mandatory, but highly reccomended”, this is especially necessary if you want to have an advantage going into any RECON G6 event.

If you love driving your r/c scaler as much as we do and you breathe adventure, then light the lipo’s and come get your scaler fix…

…in a RECON G6!

The next G6 on the Calendar is the RECON Ultra4 G6 at King of the Hammers, this is the last event on the 2013 KOH schedule starting at noon on Saturday, if you own an Axial R/C, come out and get your fix in this historic RECON Ultra4 G6. For more information on this event, click here.

For more information on RECON crawlers, and to see past G6 events, please visit their site here.

To see more about the G6 on the Axial Blog, click here.

Axial Day in Italy

Robotronics, [Axial's distributor for Italy] recently hosted a single day event catered to Axial customers and potential R/C newcomers. The event took place on Sunday, September 30th. Even though it rained for the few days prior to the event, the rain held off long enough on Sunday for the event to go off without a hitch. Attendees were treated to a custom built scale trail run that featured many different obstacles, both man made and natural. The course had a little of everything built in from hill climbs, to rock crawling sections, bridges, mud, sidehills and even trials type obstacles. There were two different classes to be run based on tire and wheel size, the 1.9 class for SCX10′s as well as the 2.2 class for the AX10′s and Wraith’s that attended. Drivers spent the morning practicing on the course to get a feel for the layout and the obstacles. After lunch the competition started for both classes, and the top 3 for each class were crowned. Numerous prizes were handed out during the day as part of the giveaway that was going on as well. So, a lucky few walked away with free R/C gear on top of a great day of R/C trail running. Looks like a great course to crawl on, especially with the mud and water holes. We are a little jealous!!

A few highlights from the event. An overall group shot.

Competitors checking out the goods!

Practice.

SCX10 climbing out of a mud hole.

Axial display.

SCX10 on 2.2 wheels and tires attempts a man made hill climb.

A Wraith climbs out of another mud hole.

A future 1:1 offroad enthusiast in training.

The full event report and photos can be found here.
http://www.robitronic.com/it/news/reader/items/axial-day-acqui-terme.html

All in all we would say it looks like a lot of fun, congrats to the winners!!

Bender’s AX10 Ridgecrest Project Backyard Basher

Now that Axial’s new Ridgecrest is readily available I wanted to show one of the Ridgecrest projects I have been working on. For this project I just wanted to build a do it all trail runner/crawler/basher. The Ridgecrest is the perfect platform for this type of build in my opinion, because of the stout AR60 axles and the well tuned suspension geometry. The purpose of this build is to have a rig that can handle a lot of various situations from sandy hills, to rocks and roots, a little water, and possibly some urban bashing. This project will also probably be a loaner vehicle on occasion as well, so I want it to work decent in all situations. Here’s a rundown of what I changed, and why.

A couple shots with the body removed. I swapped the electronics and battery trays around so the battery now sits in front for better weight distribution.

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Swapping the two trays around was easy, the only thing required was a servo extension wire. The steering servo wire lead on this rig was a bit too short for me to reach the receiver after swapping the two trays around. Servo extensions can be found at most hobby shops and online retailers for less than $5, so it is a cheap and easy solution.

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Here you can see the junction where the servo wire and the servo extension meet. I used the stock wire guide to keep the wires out of harm’s way. Also notice I moved the on/off switch to the opposite side of the chassis, just to keep wires cleanly tucked away.

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I stretched the wheelbase on this Ridgecrest to help on big rock obstacles, and hill climbs. A longer wheelbase usually helps a rig’s capabilities in these situations. So, I installed our 106mm grey links, part number AX30516, to replace the old stock plastic lower links. Then, I used our grey machined high clearance links, part number AX30469, to replace the stock upper links. In order to stretch the wheelbase as much as possible I used our long curved XR10 rod ends on all the suspension links, part number AX80057. You will need 4 of the rod end parts trees total to complete the conversion, as well as M3 threaded studs to secure the rod ends to the links, part number AXA0187. You will need two packages of the threaded studs to complete the conversion. My wheelbase now sits at 13 1/2″.

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A shot of the link set-up.

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Here you can see I also installed our new AR60 machined link mounts, part number AX30830, on the axles as well. These link mounts are cool because they have multiple mounting points, which will help you fine tune wheelbase, ride height and shock angles as needed.

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Another modification that I made was the jump to XR10 beadlock wheels, part number AX08061, and R35 Ripsaw tires, part number AX12015. This mod is one of the best you can make, the difference in traction between the stock RTR Ripsaw tires and the better R35 compound tires is night and day.

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Last thing I changed was the springs on the shocks. The stock springs were a bit too stiff for my liking, so I swapped them out for our purple comp springs, part number AX30224.

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A few shots with the newly cut body.

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So far these few mods have really transformed this vehicle into a super capable basher/trail runner, that is extremely fun to drive. Keep an eye out for my next few Ridgecrest installments covering how to convert your Ridgecrest into a capable comp crawler.

Jake Wright Takes the Win at ECC 2012

Team Axial driver Jake Wright made the long trek down to Alabama from southern California with his XR10 for the 2012 East Coast Championships, aka ECC. ECC usually brings in drivers from all over the US to compete for the east coast crown. After a long hard fought battle with talented drivers from around the country, Axial’s very own Jake Wright managed to take the win and the cash prize back to California with him. Congrats Jake!! We are proud to have you on the team!!

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Photos courtesy of Ryan Bean.

Rat Rod Formula Off Road Build

A little update on this Rat Rod FOFF build that was featured in the 100th issue of RC Driver. Now that the 100th issue has been out for a few weeks I figured it was a good time to show some detailed chassis shots. Like my last FOFF build it began life as an SCX10 Honcho. I started off by stripping the donor Honcho down to the bare frame rails. I had a certain look that I wanted to achieve with this build, which was kind of an “old school hot rod” feel. I knew that the Rat Rod body was going to be blacked out by painting it on the outside for a “flat black” look. I also knew I was going to paint the rock rings white to kind of give the wheels and tires that “white wall” look. I also knew I wanted the suspension and steering links to be colored to set them off from the rest of the build. After debating for about 3 seconds what color to go with on the links, I knew that the old school Axial green would fit the bill perfectly. Here’s a few highlights from the build process.

A few photos of the front shock towers. I moved them forward on the chassis, flipped them 180* and swapped the left and right sides to match the contour of the chassis rails. The stock frame cross member between the shock towers in these photos is for mock-up only. I ended up using the stock frame cross member that ties the radio box to the frame rails and the stock rear cross member to cap the front of the frame rails.

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I upgraded to aluminum SCX10 shock bodies, and used the stock plastic motor plate spacers for the transmission to limit the travel internally, 2 per shock shaft gave me the desired ride height and shock travel I needed. Overall length on the shocks is now 80mm. For springs I used 2 short soft springs (Part #AX30200) back to back on each shock.

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Here you can see the motor plate spacers on the shock shaft.

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A shot of the front link set-up. Lower links are 106mm (Part #AX30441) plus a 15mm standoff (Part #AXA1311) with long straight XR10 rod ends (Part #AX80057). The uppers are 70mm threaded standoffs (Part #AXA1322) with 3mm spacers (Part #AXA1303) and long straight XR10 rod ends. The front axle will also use our plastic upper 4 link mount (Part #AX80043). Notice I also moved the upper link mounts on the chassis from the stock location. The holes are already in the frame rails, but they need to be drilled out to an 1/8″ for M3 hardware.

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I copied my original FOFF’s behind the axle steering for this build as well. Here you can see I shaved the axle housing a little to clear the steering tie rod.

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A few shots of the chassis mounted servo plate. Take your time with placement of the plate on the rails, to be sure to get a proper fit. Bolt your servo up to the servo plate. Then, hold it up against the chassis and scribe the profile of the plate on the rails to make sure your holes are drilled in the proper location.

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A few shots with the servo mounted. I used a stock SCX10 RTR servo for mock-up. I ordered a Futaba S9156 servo to handle the steering duties.

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Here you can see the 6mm spacer (Part #AXA1306) I used on the servo horn to move the drag link away from the upper links. The size on this spacer may vary depending on the servo and servo horn used.

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For the drag link I used our 91mm (Part #30524) link. I put a slight bend in the link at the steering knuckle with one of our curved upper link rod ends in order to put less stress on the steering knuckle. My original FOFF build used a standoff at the knuckle with a straight drag link and that set-up put too much stress on the knuckle arm, which left me with a few broken knuckles in really hard crashes. This set-up relieves a lot of that stress.

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A few photos of the rear suspension set-up. Lower links are 98mm (Part #AX30443) with stock rod ends, the uppers are 91mm with stock rod ends.

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In order to keep the 48p gears in good working order, I installed Axial’s spur gear cover (Part #AX80078) to keep debris out of the pinion and spur gear.

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To mount the ESC, receiver and the battery I used two of our standard battery plates (Part #AX30483). For the electronics I cut about 1 1/4″ off one end of the aluminum battery plate to shorten it up, then drilled and tapped into the stock rear frame cross member. In order to mount the battery plate I drilled and countersunk two holes to line up with the stock front frame cross member where the radio box normally sits.

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An overall shot of the chassis.

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A few shots with the body mounted.

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For the cage work I used a stock Dingo roll cage (Part #AX80042) cut to fit the width of the body.

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The 2.2 wheels I used on this build are now discontinued, but our black 8 hole beadlock wheels (Part #AX8097) are still readily available. The tires are Panther paddle tires. I sanded the stock rock rings with some fine sand paper, and spray painted them white for that old school look.

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Here you can see the rear portion of the chassis protruded beyond the bed of the body. I eventually used a Dremel and cutoff wheel to trim the frame rails flush with the body, which gave it a lot cleaner look.

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The front of the Rat Rod (Part #AX4016) body is very narrow. I had to cut the sides of the hood to clear the shock towers and servo. It was a little tedious to get the fit right, but 100% worth the time it took.

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That covers a few of the custom build details on this Rat Rod FOFF. I will try to shoot some video soon. I will post up here on the blog when I am finished. Until then, I think it’s time to charge a few batteries and go scout some locations.

To see more Formula Offroad builds be sure to check out the forums on www.rccrawler.com

FOFF SCX10 in 100th Issue of RC Driver

RC Driver magazine has hit a milestone…………….their 100th issue is about to hit newstands. Axial would like to congratulate them on this historic feat, way to go guys!! One vehicle that is featured in this special 100th edition magazine is a custom formula offroad SCX10 that I built a few months back. I sent a sneak peek photo of this rig to Ty Giebel, the man behind this article, while it was in the build process. I instantly got a message back saying he wanted to do an article for RC Driver featuring this Rat Rod FOFF in a future edition of the magazine. It was tough to finish the build, knowing that the first squeeze of the trigger wasn’t going to be made by my hand. But, in end I couldn’t turn him down as I knew he would truly do this rig justice with a spectacular article and photos. Here’s a few teaser photos of the new 100th issue, and this Rat Rod FOFF build. There is more to come on this particular rig, but for now this will have to hold you over. If you want to see more, look for this issue at your local newstand.

Cover shot.

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Cover page for article.

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Last couple shots.

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OCRCRC – Comp One / 2012 Series

Orange County Radio Controlled Rock Crawlers (OCRCRC) held their first event of the 2012 calender year this past weekend. Winners of this series will get an invite to the SoCal Regionals later in the 2012 year. Winners of the SoCal Regionals event will get invites to the 2012 USRCCA Nationals. So, it is the beginning of a long road to the 2012 Nationals.

Being located in Orange County, Ca., we have access to limited terrain, and part of that terrain is man made. For the first stop of this series we hit up a local wash that is lined with concrete and rocks. There are some tough lines in this area, and there is traction for days, which allows the course designers to set some pretty crazy lines. While walking the courses before I ran I saw a few gates that made me go hmmmm. But, all gates were possible if you could find the right line through. The sun was shining and the weather forecast was calling for 80 degree temps, so the stage was set for a great day of competition.

Here are a few highlights from the event:

I set-up course one, which was a technical 20 gate marathon. The first few gates had some tough spots that you had to negotiate slowly in order to clear them without any penalties. Then, after gate 6 you had a series of technical off camber, as well as descending obstacles to clear. The last couple gates were easy if you found the proper approach.

Brandon volunteered to run my 20 gate course first, and who was I to deny him that pleasure. Of course him and his XR10 made it look easy as usual.

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OCRCRC club member/starter Tyler Schuldt broke his leg recently, so he competed on crutches all day. Not an east task in this terrain. On this particular course you had to stand inside a circle and let your spotter guide you through the course. This was the only course that played into his favor.

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Brandon spotting for Tyler.

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A few random shots.

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I spy some shafty axles, a man after my own heart!

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Jake Wright’s latest custom build with XR10 axles.

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Don Hughes attempts the 20 gate marathon course with his XR10.

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More random goodness…….

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This off camber gate forced you to blip the throttle on the way through in order to clear the lower gate.

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Another blip was needed here……..

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……..and here.

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More blip action.

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Here’s how the top 3 finished:

1st Rich B. -101

2nd Chris D. -88

3rd Jake W. -76

Congrats guys, see you at the next event!!

Axial Wraith Sway Bar Sets

Axial Wraith Sway Bar Sets

Front – AX30781

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Rear – AX30782

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Is your Wraith set-up for high speed rock racing, or G6 style events? Then this is the option part you have been waiting for: the Axial Wraith Sway Bar Kits. Designed for high speed this system will let you soften up your suspension for jumps, while keeping torque twist and body lean to a minimum during acceleration. A sway bar’s main function is to control body roll, yet still allow your shocks to move vertically with the changing terrain. What does all this mean? It means more stability at high speed. A must have upgrade for any would be rock racer.

CNC machined for precision.

Black anodized aluminum sway bar arms.

Each kit includes three different steel sway bars for fine tuning body roll and suspension articulation (soft, medium and firm).

Laser etched Axial logos.

All required hardware is included.

Simple bolt on application.

Kits available for front and rear separately.

For more info visit Axial’s Press Release Page:

http://axialracing.com/ftp/press.html