Axial AX10™ Transmission Parts List

Axial AX10 Tranmission Break Down

A quick reference parts list for the Axial AX10™ Transmission.

Found in: AX10 / SCX10 / SCX10 II RTR / WRAITH / SMT10 3 GEAR TRANS

Stock Gearing
SCX10: 32P 13T Pinion / 56T Spur Gear
SCX10 II RTR: 32P 13T Pinion / 56T Spur Gear
Wraith: 32P 12T Pinion / 56T Spur Gear
SMT10: 32P 16T Pinion / 56T Spur Gear

Axial Transmission Guide - AX10 Transmission

Gearing Chart

32 Pitch (Stock Gearing AX30392 or AX30395)

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Spur Gear

Pinion
56
60
64
68
11
38.69
41.45
44.22
46.98
12
35.47
38.00
40.53
43.07
13
32.74
35.08
37.42
39.75
14
30.40
32.57
34.74
36.91
15
28.37
30.40
32.43
34.45
16
26.60
28.50
30.40
32.30
17
25.04
26.82
28.61
30.40

32 Pitch (Overdrive Gearing AX30401)

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Spur Gear

Pinion
56
60
64
68
11
34.04
36.47
38.90
41.33
12
31.20
33.43
35.66
37.89
13
28.80
30.86
32.91
34.97
14
26.74
28.65
30.56
32.47
15
24.96
26.74
28.53
30.31
16
23.40
25.07
26.74
28.41
17
22.02
23.60
25.17
26.74

32 Pitch (Underdrive Gearing AX30402)

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Spur Gear

Pinion
56
60
64
68
11
43.78
46.91
50.04
53.16
12
40.13
43.00
45.87
48.73
13
37.05
39.69
42.34
44.98
14
34.40
36.86
39.31
41.77
15
32.11
34.40
36.69
38.99
16
30.10
32.25
34.40
36.55
17
28.33
30.35
32.38
34.40

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AXIAL AX10™ TRANSMISSION PARTS LIST

AX30487 Complete AX10 Transmission
AXA013 M2x6mm SH Screws
AXA089 M3x25mm SC Screws
AXA1045 M4 Nylon Lock Nuts
AXA1053 M3 Nylon Locking Hex Nuts
AXA1218 Bearing, 5x10x4mm (2 pkgs)
AXA1225 Bearing, 8x16x5mm
AX30162 Cross Pin
AX30190 Shaft 5x18mm
AX30394 20T Drive Gear
AX30413 Slipper Spring
AX30435 Steel Outdrive Set
AX30491 AX10 RTR Motor Plate
AX31026 Slipper Plate Washer
AX31027 Spur Gear 32P 56T
AX31068 Slipper Pad
AX31149 Slipper Drive Gear Shaft
AX80009 Transmission Set
AX80010 Gear Set
AX80078 Transmission Spur Gear Cover

How To Build a Winning Deadbolt Monster Truck!

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How to build a Winning Axial Deadbolt Monster truck!

By John Schultz

All of these trucks are based off of the Axial Deadbolt. With a couple of mods you can change your Deadbolt in to a Winning Monster truck too! All of the suspension is the same as the Axial Deadbolt besides adding some links and some option parts to help with durability.

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John Schultz’s winning Axial Deadbolt at the No Limit RC Monster Truck World Finals

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Bari Musawwir TQ and Winner in the Mini Shafty Monster Truck Class at the 4 Link Nats

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Russ Taking the Win in Shafty Monster Truck Class at the 4 Link Nats

First, what you need to install are AX31109 Yeti Links for the front and rear.  The biggest change will be adding a front and rear sway bar. This is super easy to do. Install the AX80118 Battery tray on the front of the chassis and you will have sway bar mounts front and rear. Use AX30782 Wraith sway bar set with the heavy bar. I also used AXA1429 post to clean up the look of the Sway Bar.

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To get the width, I used HPI 88055 Wideners with Tamyia Clodbuster Rims 9335085 and TAM0005294 Adapters, with 10114-02 Pro Line Destroyers!

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For the front Axle, use AX30780 AR60 OCP Universals to keep the steering smooth, combined with the AX30760 Alum Knuckles, AX30762 C-Hubs, rear AX30789 Alum Straight Axle for durability, and AX30829 Alum Diff Cover front and rear to polish it off!

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For the transmission, I used AX30708 Metal gears, AX30401 36t/14t Front, AX30395 38t/13t HD Machine Ring and Pinion gears and AX31100 Alum Skid plate to plant all the Power!

For handling, install diff gears front and rear. I used the AXA1162 o-ring, AX30390 Diff Gear, AX30170 Diff Pin. Plus, I run a black grease inside the diff.

Shock Set up is different with all 3 trucks, I personally run AX30223 14x70mm 1.04 Springs with 10 wt oil in AX31171 Icon Shocks.

Other Optional parts we use to help strengthen the truck are:
AX30836 Alum Servo Horn  25t
AX30830 OCP Links Mounts
AX31101 AX Alum Shock Brace
AX31099 Alum Upper Link Capture
AX30860 Machine Motor Plate

Here are some under the Hood Pics!

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John Schultz’s World Finals Truck

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Bari Musawwir’s Mini Shafty Winning Truck

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Russ Bryant’s Winning Shafty Monster Truck

Full Option RTR Deadbolt

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Axial offers several optional upgrade parts for the RTR Deadbolt. Here is a quick run down of what is installed and why you may want to use these items.

A couple photos of the fully option RTR Deadbolt. Axial also offers clear replacement Deadbolt bodies, part number AX04039, for those that want to customize the look of their trucks.
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First option parts that can be seen here are the 2.2 Maxxis Trepador tires in our sticky R35 compound, part number AX12022. We also installed our VMS beadlock wheels, part number AX08061. We will cover more on the VMS wheels later on in this article.
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Body off shot!
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Next option part we installed is a 25t aluminum servo horn, part number AX30836. Axial’s HD aluminum servo horn provides more responsive steering with less chance of stripping the internal splines over the stock plastic servo horn. Clamping style head for secure mounting in high stress applications. Available in 23, 24 and 25 tooth spline counts.

Axial’s HD differential covers, part number AX30829. HD diff covers protect ring and pinion gears from being damaged by rocks, just like their 1:1 counterparts, all while adding a little bling to your ride.

Aluminum axle lockouts are another available option, part number AX30789. Axial’s aluminum axle lockouts are more rigid than the stock plastic lockouts, which will allow the vehicle to track better in all situations.

Another great upgrade is Axial’s aluminum shocks, part number AX30092. Aluminum shocks provide better dampening than the stock plastic shocks, especially when mated with our Delrin shock pistons. Aluminum shock bodies also dissipate heat better than the stock plastic bodies. Oversize 3.5mm shock shafts for rigidity. Great for high power applications and long run times. Axial also offer a complete line of various springs to fine tune your suspension as needed, see the complete parts list below for more info.

Another option part that is hiding behind the HD diff cover is Axial’s HD ring and pinion gears, part number AX30395. HD ring and pinion gears are more efficient than the stock aluminum ring and pinions. CNC machined for precision. Hardened steel for durability. Great for high power applications. Axial also offers hardened steel overdrive ring and pinion gear sets, part number AX30401, for a little extra wheel speed. We also offer an underdrive ring and pinion gear sets, part number AX30402, for a little more torque in binds.

Axial’s HD lower link mounts are another noteworthy upgrade, part number AX30830. Our HD lower link mounts allow users to fine tune ride height and wheelbase by providing more adjustment holes than the stock plastic units.

You can see a handful of options parts in this photo. First option is the aluminum knuckles, part number AX30760. Aluminum knuckles provide more responsive steering and help your vehicle track better at speeds and in the rocks. Another option shown is the Axial Aluminum C-hubs, part number AX30762. Aluminum C-hubs also help your vehicle track more consistently in all situations, especailly when used in conjunction with our aluminum knuckles. Also notice the AR60 universal axles, part number AX30780. Axial universal joint axles increase steering angle to 50 degrees, that’s 60% over the stock dogbone/drive cup setup. These universals provide smoother action for a higher performing, efficient drivetrain. The universal is oversized; typical for 1/8 scale vehicles and made of hardened steel so it’s capable of handling extreme power.

Our intention with this project was to build a solid axled basher that can handle a lot of power. Axial’s Vanguard Brushless System was the perfect fit to supply that power. The 2900KV brushless motor, part number AX24010, is more efficient that standard brushed motors and provides a lot more power for hill climbs and general monster truck style bashing over the stock set-up. Providing control for the brushless motor is our Vanguard ESC, part number AX24260. The Vanguard ESC has an array of features that can be programmed manually or with a Castle Link. Highlighted features include adjustable drag brake, lipo cutoff, traction control, motor timing, etc. Our Vanguard ESC is compatible with both brushed and brushless motors, so it can be run with either configuration. Standard Deans® Ultra Plug® battery connector included.

Another great upgrade is the Wraith Stage One link kit, part number AX30797. This kit is geared towards the Wraith, but also works great with the Deadbolt. Especially if you are going to compete at rock crawling competitions, as the wheelbase falls just under the 12 1/2″ max wheelbase limit. Our Stage One link Kit replaces all the stock plastic suspension links with high quality 7mm diameter aluminum links. Eliminates axle wrap and unwanted axle steer, especially in high power applications. Axial also offers machined heavy duty aluminum straight links, part number AX30790, to replace the stock plastic lower links as an alternative the the Stage One link kit.

Axial’s HD motor plate, part number AX30860. Our heavy duty motor plate is for any vehicle running our AX10 transmission. CNC machined from 4.5mm thick billet aluminum, with integrated heatsink fins to help motors run cooler on those all day expeditions. A must have for any R/C overland adventurist! Axial also offers 13t, 14t and 15t steel pinion gears and an 80t spur gear to give end users an array of gear ratios to choose from. Add more torque for low speed crawling to your Deadbolt by installing one of Axial’s optional brushed motors available in 27t and 55t configurations. Axial also offers a complete steel transmission gear set for even more durability, part number AX30708.

Once again for wheels we went with our VWS beadlocks, part number AX08061. VWS wheels allow users to tune foam set-ups and change tires at will for varying terrain and conditions. Another wheel option offered by Axial is our black 8 hole beadlock wheels, part number AX8097. These wheels offer a little wider overall stance which equals stability at high speeds. For low speed rock crawling you can increase your Deadbolt’s climbing abilities by adding Axial’s 2.2 Internal Weight Rings, part number AX30545. Add even more weight by utilizing Axial’s 2.2 Internal Wheel Weights for the Internal Wheel Weight Rings, part number AX30546.

You can see our R35 Ripsaw tires pictured here, part number AX12015. R35 Ripsaw tires offer both a realistic look for the image-conscious scale crawler and for those looking to up their performance game. This 2.2 Ripsaw offers an aggressive tread design, greater ground clearance, and is made from a R35 sticky compound. The VWS wheels include black aluminum rings, but I swapped those out for our Grey beadlock rings, part number AX08133, just to match the grey colored suspension links.

Complete Deadbolt option parts list:
AX8097 – 2.2 Black 8 Hole Beadlock Wheels (x2)
AX08061 – 2.2 VWS Beadlock Wheels (x2)
AX08133 – Grey VWS Beadlock Rings (x2)
AX08141 – 2.2 Trail Ready Beadlock Wheel – Black (x2)
AX08142 – 2.2 Trail Ready Beadlock Wheel – Black and Chrome (x2)
AX12015 – 2.2 R35 Ripsaw Tires (x2)
AX12022 – 2.2 Maxxis Trepador Tires (x2)
AX12021 – 2.2 BFGoodrich Krawler T/A Tires (x2)
AX30545 – 2.2 Internal Wheel Weight Rings (x2)
AX30546 – 2.2 Wheel Weight Inserts (x2)
AX30797 – Stage One Link Kit
AX30790 – Machined Heavy Duty Aluminum Straight Link 101mm (x2)
AX30469 – Machined Heavy Duty Aluminum High Clearance Upper Links (x2)
AX80057 – XR10 Linkage Set (x4 for all 8 links)
AX30395 – HD Ring and Pinion Gear Sets (stock gear ratio) (x2)
AX30401 – Overdrive HD Ring and Pinion Gear Sets (x2)
AX30402 – Underdrive HD Ring and Pinion Gear Sets (x2)
AX30571 – 13t Steel Pinion Gear
AX30569 – 14t Steel Pinion Gear
AX30573 – 15t Steel Pinion Gear
AX30665 – 80t Spur Gear
AX30708 – Steel Transmission Gear Set
AX30829 – HD Differential Covers (x2)
AX30860 – HD Motor Plate
AX30830 – HD Link Mounts (x2)
AX30834 – 23t HD Servo Horn
AX30835 – 24t HD Servo Horn
AX30836 – 25t HD Servo Horn
AX30762 – Aluminum Axle C-hub’s
AX30760 – Aluminum Knuckles
AX30789 – Aluminum Axle Lockouts
AX30092 – Aluminum Shocks (x2)
AX30780 – AR60 Universal Axle Set
AX24260 – AE-3 Vanguard ESC
AX24010 – Vanguard 2900KV Brushless Motor
AX24007 – 55 Turn Motor
AX24004 – 27 Turn Motor
AX04032 – Clear Ridgecrest Body
AX30223 – Black Springs 1.04 lbs/in (x2)
AX30224 – Purple Springs 1.43 lbs/in (x2)
AX30225 – Orange Springs 1.75 lbs/in (x2)
AX30218 – Red Springs 2.07 lbs/in (x2)
AX30219 – White Springs 2.47 lbs/in (x2)
AX30220 – Green Springs 2.85 lbs/in (x2)
AX30221 – Yellow Springs 3.27 lbs/in (x2)
AX30222 – Blue Springs 3.55 lbs/in (x2)

Full Option RTR SCX10 Jeep

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Axial offers several optional upgrade parts for the Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon RTR and Kit. Here’s a quick run down of what is installed and why you may want to use these items.

A couple photos of the completed full option build. Axial offers complete body kits for the Jeep, part number AX04035, that includes the clear Lexan body and all the scale accessories. We also offer just the replacement clear Jeep bodies as well, part number AX04033.

First option we will cover is Axial’s simple LED kit, part number AX24257. The simple LED kit comes with 4 white and 2 red LED lights to keep you running long after the sun goes down. I used two small light buckets from Axial’s Light Bucket Set, part number AX80045, and attached them to the front bumper mount with long M3 screws. I used Axial’s LED lens set, part number AX80049, to cover the LEDs front and rear for a more realistic look. The lens kit includes both clear and yellow lens covers to give users a couple options. Need even more light? Add our NVS system, part number AX24251, for the ultimate scale light system.

A couple shots of the rear LEDs with the clear lens covers in place.

Next option added was our new fully licensed Icon shocks, part number AX30103. These come standard in the Jeep kit, but are an option part for the RTR. These shocks feature a new and improved CNC machined shock piston for smoother action through the range of travel. The new Icon shocks also feature clear coated polished aluminum bodies, complete with aluminum faux reservoirs. The main body of the shock is threaded for quick ride height adjustments and pre-load tuning ability. Like their full size counterparts these shocks are completely rebuildable, tunable and offer consistent handling all while adding some of that Icon bling to your SCX10™ chassis.

Axial’s aluminum link kit, part number AX30550, for the SCX10™ was the next upgrade we added. Upgrade your stock plastic links to high quality aluminum. Aluminum links have less flex than the stock plastic links which helps your vehicle track straighter in all conditions. This link kit includes aluminum suspension and steering links, as well as all hardware and rod ends required to complete the conversion.

A shot of the steering links. If you just want to upgrade your steering links only Axial offers a steering upgrade kit, part number AX30426, as well. Upgrading your steering links to aluminum with improve steering response in all conditions, especially in hard binds associated with rock crawling. Another option part that can be seen here is Axial’s HD 25t aluminum servo horn, part number AX30836. Axial’s HD aluminum servo horn provides more responsive steering with less chance of stripping the internal splines over the stock plastic servo horn. Clamping style head for secure mounting in high stress applications. Available in 23, 24 and 25 tooth spline counts.

In this photo you can see a handful of upgrades to improve steering performance and increase the strength of the front axle. Aluminum knuckles, part number AX30496, aluminum knuckles help your vehicle track more consistently in all situations. Combine our knuckles with our aluminum C-hubs, part number AX30495, for the ultimate steering precision. Another option part installed here is Axial’s CVD’s, part number AX30464, for the SCX10™ axles. The CVD’s provide more steering throw that the stock dog bone set-up which is great for tight, technical trail runs. CVD’s also have less slop than the stock set-up for increased efficiency.

Moving on to the rear axle we installed our aluminum axle lockouts, part number AX30494. Axial’s aluminum axle lockouts are more rigid than the stock plastic lockouts, which will allow the vehicle to track better in all situations.

Axial’s HD motor plate was our next upgrade, part number AX30860. Our heavy duty motor plate is for any vehicle running our AX10 transmission. CNC machined from 4.5mm thick billet aluminum, with integrated heatsink fins to help motors run cooler on those all day expeditions. A must have for any R/C overland adventurist! Axial also offers 13T, 14T and 15T steel pinion gears and an 80T spur gear to give end users an array of gear ratios to choose from. Add more torque for low speed crawling to your SCX10™ by installing Axial’s 55T motor. Or if more speed is your thing, add Axial’s 20T motor for higher top speeds. Another option part that we installed here is Axial’s dig system for the Wraith transmission, part number AX30793. This conversion also requires use of our Wraith Dig Transmission Case, part number AX80051. Axial’s dig system allows you to lock the rear wheels, while powering the front wheels only for a tighter turning radius. Shift servo sold separately.

Next option part installed is Axial’s black 1.9 beadlock wheels. Beadlock wheels allow users to tune foam set-ups and change tires at will for varying terrain and conditions. We also added our 1.9 internal weight rings, part number AX30547, for some added weight up front which will help us on steep vertical climbs. You can adjust how much weight is in the front wheels by using our 1.9 wheel weight inserts, part number AX30548.

For tires we went with our 1.9 Maxxis Trepador, part number AX12019. These tires are fully licensed by Maxxis and are molded in Axial’s sticky R35 compound for the ultimate traction in any conditions.

Complete SCX10™ option parts list:
AX8087 – 1.9 Black Eight Hole Beadlock Wheels (x3 to have spare tire)
AX8088 – 1.9 Chrome Eight Hole Beadlock Wheel (x3 to have spare tire)
AX08138 – 1.9 Black Walker Evans Wheels (x3 to have spare tire)
AX12019 – 1.9 Maxxis Trepador Tires R35 Compound (x3 to have spare tire)
AX12016 – 1.9 Ripsaw Tire R35 Compound (x3 to have spare tire)
AX30547 – 1.9 Internal Weight Rings (x2)
AX30548 – 1.9 Wheel Weight Inserts (x3)
AX30549 – SCX10™ Aluminum Link Set (11.4″ wheelbase – Dingo)
AX30550 – SCX10™ Aluminum Link Set (12.3″ wheelbase – Honcho and Jeep)
AX30426 – SCX10™ Aluminum Steering Kit
AX30464 – SCX10™ Universal Axle Set
AX30395 – HD Ring and Pinion Gear Sets (stock gear ratio) (x2)
AX30401 – Overdrive HD Ring and Pinion Gear Sets (x2)
AX30402 – Underdrive HD Ring and Pinion Gear Sets (x2)
AX30786 – Aluminum WB8 Driveshaft Retainer Rings (x2)
AX30571 – 13t Steel Pinion Gear
AX30569 – 14t Steel Pinion Gear
AX30573 – 15t Steel Pinion Gear
AX30665 – 80t Spur Gear
AX30860 – HD Motor Plate
AX30834 – 23t HD Servo Horn
AX30835 – 24t HD Servo Horn
AX30836 – 25t HD Servo Horn
AX30494 – Aluminum Axle Lockouts
AX30495 – Aluminum Axle C-hub’s
AX30496 – Aluminum Knuckles
AX30103 – Icon Aluminum Shocks (x2)
AX30132 – Machined Shock Piston 7mm – 1.5×3 (4pcs)
AX24260 – AE-3 Vanguard ESC
AX24010 – Vanguard 2900KV Brushless Motor
AX24007 – 55 Turn Motor
AX24003 – 20 Turn Motor
AX24256 – 5 LED Light String
AX24257 – Simple LED Kit
AX24251 – NVS Light System
AX80045 – Light Bucket Set (x2)
AX80049 – LED Lens Set – Yellow / Clear (4pcs)
AX30793 – Dig Component Set
AX80051 – Dig Transmission Case
AX04033 – Clear Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon Body (Body only)
AX04035 – Complete Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon Body Kit
AX30200 – Red Springs 3.6 lbs/in (short) (x2)
AX30201 – White Springs 4.32 lbs/in (short) (x2)
AX30202 – Green Springs 5.44 lbs/in (short) (x2)
AX30203 – Yellow Springs 6.53 lbs/in (short) (x2)
AX30204 – Blue Springs 7.95 lbs/in (short) (x2)
AX30205 – Red Springs 2.7 lbs/in (long) (x2)
AX30206 – White Springs 3.6 lbs/in (long) (x2)
AX30207 – Green Springs 4.08 lbs/in (long) (x2)
AX30208 – Yellow Springs 5.44 lbs/in (long) (x2)
AX30209 – Blue Springs 6.81 lbs/in (long) (x2)

Axialfest 2013 – The Recap!

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Photos by Tristan

Axialfest 2013! Where do I start? Hundreds of night stage gates? Beautiful trail runs through the vast Tahoe wilderness? Backyard racing on an epic handcrafted track? Scalers floating downstream on homemade watercraft? A weekend of camping alongside 200+ fellow R/C enthusiasts? Mud pits that would make your mom cringe? My head’s still spinning a month later! Let’s back-up a little, one year to be exact!

I attended Axialfest in 2012, and had a blast. I got more drive time in on that one 3 day weekend, then all of the previous year combined……………….seriously! I entered so many classes I could hardly keep my batteries charged in time for the next event / class! On top of running the numerous classes that were available, I was there to document the event for Axial. So, it was an extremely busy weekend for me.

Fast forward one year to Axialfest 2013. I decided this year I was going to only enter one class for the Terra Cross races and the rest of the weekend would be utilized shooting photos and video of the whole Axialfest experience, as well as interacting with event attendees. This would allow me to to take in the event’s ambiance a little more than the previous year. While I did miss the R/C side of it a little this year, I had a lot more time to document the event.

Friday got started with the UTAC event and Rock Riot, and the momentum never let up the rest of the weekend. Here’s a quick run down of the weekend!

UTAC competitors line up for the start.
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A lone competitor running the Rock Riot class.
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Friday night was the first big stage for the G6 event. Drivers started out just before sunset, and were on course well into the night. It was crazy to sit at G-Central headquarters and watch all the lights in the woods flicker around you as competitors navigated the courses. Max Gremillion from Pull-Pal and Brian Parker pose for the camera before the night stage gets started.
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There was plenty of water and mud to be had on the Friday night stage.
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Saturday was going to be the busiest day by far with events starting out first thing in the morning, and carrying well into the night. Driver’s were gathering at the rally style start box early in the morning preparing for the day’s events.
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The highlight for Saturday was the creek challenge. Competitors that wanted to participate had to fab a boat / float for their rigs. Once they reached a certain gate marker on course, they had to load their vehicles onto their boat / float and send it down stream. Some competitors built basic floats that went where the stream’s current took them. Others got crafty and had powered boats that were either driven by their own motor, or the wheels of the scaler being carried. It was an interesting spot to sit and spectate from for sure!
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If your float needed some guidance to get downstream resident creek monitor Cole Bailey would help coax your set-up in the right direction.
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An example of a very basic, but extremely effective float. This guys navigated his home made float down stream like a champ!
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More action!
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Braaappp!!
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A couple shots from Saturday night’s stage.
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Good lights are a definite must for the night stages, some gates can be tough to find in the pitch black of the mountain forest!
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A bad jerky commercial? No, it’s just Charlie from Novak and his new found friend. Pretty sure this will show up on both their FB pages!
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The prize giveaway was held on Saturday night after the night stage. Tons of goodies up for grabs from Axial and the Axialfest sponsors!
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Sunday morning got started with the RTX races. RTX is short for Recon Terra Cross, which is best defined as backyard racing at its finest! EXO RTX!
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Hybrid / Wrexo RTX!
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1.9 RTX!
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2.2 RTX!
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And the RTX mud pit which never disappoints!
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That wraps up our coverage of Axialfest 2013! Every year this event keeps getting bigger, we had 160+ competitors this year which was awesome to see! Axial would like to thank everyone involved in this year’s event from the sponsors, to the volunteers, to the event attendees, everyone! We want to see 200+ entries next year, so spread the word and keep the month of June 2014 open!
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Axial Day in Italy

Robotronics, [Axial's distributor for Italy] recently hosted a single day event catered to Axial customers and potential R/C newcomers. The event took place on Sunday, September 30th. Even though it rained for the few days prior to the event, the rain held off long enough on Sunday for the event to go off without a hitch. Attendees were treated to a custom built scale trail run that featured many different obstacles, both man made and natural. The course had a little of everything built in from hill climbs, to rock crawling sections, bridges, mud, sidehills and even trials type obstacles. There were two different classes to be run based on tire and wheel size, the 1.9 class for SCX10′s as well as the 2.2 class for the AX10′s and Wraith’s that attended. Drivers spent the morning practicing on the course to get a feel for the layout and the obstacles. After lunch the competition started for both classes, and the top 3 for each class were crowned. Numerous prizes were handed out during the day as part of the giveaway that was going on as well. So, a lucky few walked away with free R/C gear on top of a great day of R/C trail running. Looks like a great course to crawl on, especially with the mud and water holes. We are a little jealous!!

A few highlights from the event. An overall group shot.

Competitors checking out the goods!

Practice.

SCX10 climbing out of a mud hole.

Axial display.

SCX10 on 2.2 wheels and tires attempts a man made hill climb.

A Wraith climbs out of another mud hole.

A future 1:1 offroad enthusiast in training.

The full event report and photos can be found here.
http://www.robitronic.com/it/news/reader/items/axial-day-acqui-terme.html

All in all we would say it looks like a lot of fun, congrats to the winners!!

Bender’s AX10 Ridgecrest – Stage 3

Here is the final installment of my Ridgecrest crawler build, Stage 3. For this stage of the build I will be adding AR60 universals, aluminum shocks, under drive ring and pinion for rear axle, aluminum c-hubs, aluminum knuckles, aluminum lockouts, HD motor plate and a 55t motor. I will also be adding a few hop-ups from Vanquish Products as well. If you have never heard of Vanquish Products, check them out!! Their machine work and quality control is second to none. I will be adding a set of their DH wheels and titanium steering links to this build. So, let’s get started!!

The first hop-up I started with is the under drive ring and pinion for the rear axle. Adding the slower gear set to the rear axle will keep the front axle spinning faster in all situations. This will help with tight turns, and getting the front tires to pull up steep ledges. It can also help alleviate torque twist/chassis roll while on the throttle, which all shaft driven crawlers suffer from. The difference in the gearing between the front and rear after this modification is very slight, but it makes a pretty big difference. The old ring and pinion had a 13t pinion, with a 38t ring gear. This HD under drive combo has a 13t pinion and a 43t ring gear. It may sound like a big difference, but it really isn’t. Original ratio was 2.92:1. The new ratio for the rear axle is 3.30:1.

Since I will be tearing into both axles, I started by removing all 4 tires with my 7mm driver.

After removing the tires use a 1.5mm driver to remove the drive hexes and cross pins.

Now we can remove the two screws that hold the rear axle lockouts in place. Slide the lockouts off the housing, and just let them hang there for now.

Then loosen the driveshaft set screw at the rear axle housing, and set the male half of the driveshaft aside for now.

Next we can pull the differential cover off to access the ring and pinion.

Now remove the plastic bearing retainers using a 2mm driver.

Make sure the axle shafts are pulled out of the differential assembly. Then you can remove the differential. I used a paper towel to wipe most of the grease away, makes working on the assembly a lot easier.

Remove the 4 screws holding the ring gear to the plastic diff housing. Pull the bearing off the ring gear as well.

Now pull the ring gear off the diff housing. Be careful not to rip the gasket that goes in between the gear and housing. You will want to re-use those with the new ring gear.

Set the gasket into place on the new ring gear so the hole pattern lines up.

Now you can re-assemble the differential, and slide the bearing into place on the new ring gear.

Slide the old pinion gear out of the axle housing.

Now slide the new HD pinion into the axle housing. Double check that both bearings are still in place at this time too.

Set the differential assembly into place, after applying a light coat of grease to the ring gear.

Re-install the plastic bearing retainers.

Slide the axle shafts back into the differential assembly. Notice I also installed some aluminum lockouts at this time too.

Next I will install a 55t motor for more torque and better low speed throttle resolution. I will be running this with a small 3S lipo, I have some older 1550mah packs that should work perfect.

Start by unplugging the stock motor from the ESC.

Then remove both set screws that hold the driveshafts to the transmission outputs.

Remove the four screws that hold the battery tray in place. Remember that I moved the battery tray from the back to the front during Stage 1.

Lay the chassis on it’s side and remove the four screws that hold the transmission into place.

With the transmission out of the chassis, you can remove the spur gear cover to access the motor mount screws.

Using a 2.5mm driver remove the motor mount screws.

Remove the motor from the transmission.

Now we can pull the pinion off the motor’s output shaft.

While I have the transmission out on the bench I am going to swap the stock motor plate for our new HD motor plate. The newer plate has integrated heatsinks machined into it to help dissipate heat.

In order to install the new motor plate we will have to remove the slipper clutch/spur gear assembly. Using a 7mm nut driver remove the slipper nut, spring and washers.

Slide the spur gear off the shaft, and remove the drive pin.

Using a 2.5mm driver remove the motor plate from the transmission.

Set the new motor plate in place and attach with the existing 3mm screws.

Next we can bolt the spur gear assembly back into place, don’t forget to install the cross pin first.

Now we can install the new 55t motor. I already installed the pinion gear onto the motor shaft. We just need to set the proper gear mesh and tighten everything down. The easiest way to set gear mesh is by inserting a small piece of paper between the spur gear and the pinion gear. Hold the two gears together with the paper in between and tighten your motor mount screws. Remove the paper and you should have a little bit of play between the two gears, which means you are good to go.

Re-install the spur gear cover next. Now you can bolt the transmission back into the chassis, and re-attach the driveshafts.

Next I will be swapping out the stock plastic shocks for our aluminum competition shocks. The aluminum shocks have a lot more consistent feel to them, and are smooth as silk when properly built.

Here is a link that will give you some tips for proper build up of our competition shocks.
http://www.axialracing.com/blog_posts/1132

A shot of the freshly assembled shocks.

One change I made here was to use the rubber bushings that come with the new aluminum shocks in the shock cap, instead of the plastic ball studs. In order to keep the bushings in good working order, and free to move back and forth a little, I swapped the self tapping plastic screws for machined M3 flathead screws. The finer threads on the M3 screw shouldn’t tear the upper shock bushing like the stock self tapper would over time. I also went with a flathead screw over a buttonhead to let the upper shock cap pivot better as the suspension cycles.

All installed and ready to go!

Next we will address the front axle. I am going to install AR60 universals, aluminum c-hubs, aluminum knuckles and Vanquish Products titanium steering links.

Universals.

C-hubs.

Knuckles.

Vanquish steering links.

Start by removing the drive hexes and cross pins.

Then remove the servo horn and steering linkage.

Remove the four screws that hold the c-hub and knuckle assembly on the axle housing.

Next we need to remove the inner axles. But, to get them out of the housing you will need to remove one screw from each lower shock/link mount. Removing those will allow the flange on the inner axles to slide out with out hanging up on the link mount screws.

Slide the new aluminum c-hubs into place. I clocked them back just a little to help with tight turns. Make sure the c-hubs are oriented correctly, the longer ear on the hubs should be on the bottom of the axle.

Here you can see they are slightly clocked, but not to the most extreme point.

Install the c-hub screws top and bottom for both sides.

Grab the universals next.

Slide the universals into the housing and seat them into the diff assembly.

Now you can re-install the two screws we removed from the lower link mounts to get the stock inner axles out of the housing.

You will need the bearings, king pin sleeves and kingpin screws from the old knuckle/c-hub assembly. So, pull them apart and grab what you need to build the new knuckles up and bolt them into place on the c-hubs.

If you are struggling with installing the new bearings, use the old outer axle to line them up properly and press them into place.

Install the kingpin sleeves into the new knuckles and slide them over the c-hubs. Make sure the kingpins sleeves stay in place.

You will need to replace the old self tapping knuckle screws with 10mm long machined M3 screws. The stock knuckles were held in place by plastic self tapping screws, but you can’t use those screws in the new c-hubs as the hubs have a machined M3 thread in them. So, you will need some M3X10MM machined screws to complete this step. Part number for those is AXA115. There are 10 screws per package, so one pack is enough to do the job.

Next we need to bolt the tie rod arms onto the knuckles. But, you will need to swap the stock plastic self tappers for machined screws again. Luckily they are the same length as the kingpin screws from the previous step, and you will have some leftover to use here as well.

Now we will assemble the Vanquish tie rod and drag link. Pretty straight forward, thread the rod ends onto the linkage and pop the ball studs into place. You will have to fine tune the lengths of both the tie rod and the drag link once they are bolted up, in order to ensure the tires are straight and the servo horn has even throw to both sides.

Next I installed my Vanquish DH comp wheels. They are machined aluminum, and the weight of them alone should be sufficient in most situations. If I find the front is too light I will add some weighted slugs to the front wheels.

A few finished shots of this rig as it sits now.

Mandatory flex shots.

That wraps up Stage 3 of this Ridgecrest crawler build. I am going to try and shoot some video of this stage too, just to see/show the difference in performance over Stage 2. Stay tuned!!

Link – Stage One Ridgecrest Build
Link – Stage Two Ridgecrest Build

Parts list for the three stages of this build.

Stage one
AX30223 Black competition springs (x2)

Stage two
AXA1331 Steel ball studs (x5)
AX30836 Aluminum 25 spline servo horn
AX30829 Aluminum differential cover (x2)
AX30797 Aluminum link kit
AX12015 R35 Ripsaw tires (x2)
AX08061 XR10 beadlock wheels
Vanquish wheel weights

Stage three
AX30402 HD 43/13 ring and pinion gears (rear axle only)
AX30789 Aluminum rear axle lockouts
AX24007 55t motor
AX30860 HD motor plate
AX30092 Aluminum comp shocks (x2)
AX30780 AR60 CVD’s
AX30762 Aluminum c-hubs
AX30760 Aluminum knuckles
VPS03122 Vanquish titanium drag link
VPS03110 Vanquish titanium tie rod
Vanquish 2.2 Aluminum wheels
Vanquish wheel weights (x2)

Axial visits 2012 Easter Jeep Safari – Highlights Video

We finally found some time to edit a highlight video from the 2012 Easter Jeep Safari in Moab, Utah. Highlights include trail runs with Rebel Offroad on Hell’s Revenge, Poison Spider Mesa and Metal Masher. Also shot some footage at Area BFE with the R/C’s. We even found a little sand to play in for the Formula Offroad vehicles and the EXO.

Enjoy!!

Bender’s AX10 Ridgecrest Stage 2

It’s time for Part 2 of our Ridgecrest crawler build. For those that missed Stage 1, here is a link to that article in order to bring you up to speed.
Stage 1 Ridgecrest crawler build

Out of the box the Ridgecrest is meant to be more of a basher, rather then a full on crawler. So, for Stage 2 of this build we will cover more tips, and option parts, to improve upon its crawling capabilities.

First thing we will work on for this installment is the steering. Out of the box the Ridgecrest comes equipped with a plastic servo horn, which works fine with the stock steering links. But, I want piece of mind when out crawling and don’t like making repairs in the field. So, I am going to install an aluminum servo horn, and upgrade the plastic ball studs to steel for a little smoother steering action. Some may think that upgrading the plastic steering links at this time is a more worthy modification. But, I actually like a little flex in my steering set-up on my crawlers. Some of you may recall I ran Delrin steering links on my competition crawler for years with good success. It’s really personal preference at this point.

Start by removing both front tires.

Use a 2mm driver and remove the button head screw from the servo output.

After removing the screw, slide the servo horn off the splines.

Now remove the plastic servo horn from the steering drag link.

Using a pair of wire cutters remove the plastic ball stud from the steering drag link.

Now we will replace the plastic ball stud with a steel stud.

Use a pair of pliers to pop the new steel stud into place.

The new replacement servo horn. There are a few different spline counts for the various servos that are available on the market. For RTR Axial vehicles you will need a 25 spline servo horn, which is compatible with Futaba and Savox servos as well.

Install the servo horn onto the drag link.

Now slide the servo horn into place on the servo output. Make sure your servo is centered before tightening everything up. Reinstall the button head screw to hold the new servo horn in place.

These new servo horns have small screws on each side of the head. When these screws are tightened down the servo horn actually clamps onto the servo’s output splines like a piranha. A must have for harsh conditions. Use a 1.5mm driver and gently tighten up both screws evenly.

Next we will pop a new steel stud into place at the opposite end of the drag link. Remove the self tapping screw that ties the drag link to the tie rod.

Pop the old stud out and replace with a steel ball stud.

Now remove the tie rod from the steering knuckles and replace the plastic ball studs there too.

After replacing the ball studs I left one end of the tie rod off the knuckle to access the differential cover. This is for my next modification.

Next we will install Axial’s HD diff covers to add some style, and even more beef, to those AR60 axles.

Use a 1.5mm driver and remove the 4 screws on each side of the stock plastic diff cover.

Remove the cover.

Insert the new diff cover and re-install the diff cover screws. Re-attach the steering tie rod to the knuckle when finished.

Now swap the rear cover out.

Styling!

Next I am going to swap the stock plastic suspension links out for aluminum using our Wraith Stage 1 links kit.

Contents of the links pack laid out.

Start by assembling the 4 lower links.

Using a 1.5mm driver screw the threaded studs into the rod ends.

Make sure to trim any excess flashing away with an X-acto knife. This has no performance gain, it just makes for a cleaner install.

Once you have the threaded studs installed, assemble the lower links. Make sure the rod ends as facing opposite ways as shown in this photo. Pops the ball studs into place last.

Now move on to the upper links.

Repeat the same steps for the upper links. All 4 upper links assembled. Again make sure the rod ends are facing opposite each other.

Remove the lower links and swap them out for the new aluminum lowers.

Now swap the upper links out as well. Pay attention to the orientation of the upper links during assembly so all four are installed the same way.

Here you can see the front after completing the conversion to aluminum links. The aluminum will eliminate any link flex in hard binds, which makes for a more predictable vehicle.

Another mod I want to make for this Stage 2 build is the jump from Tamiya battery connectors to Dean’s Ultra Plugs. I plan on running small lipo packs in this build from here on out, and all my small packs have Dean’s plugs. So, the Tamiya plug had to go.

Snip, Snip!!

First thing I do after cutting the old plug off is to slide the heat shrink tubing for the Ultra Plug into place. Nothing is worse then installing new battery connectors and putting your soldering iron away, only to realize you forgot the slide the heat shrink on first. Doh!!

Strip a little of the wire’s insulation off the ends to be soldered, and twist the ends of the wire to prevent fraying.

Using your soldering iron, tin the ends of the wires a little with solder. Do the same to the tabs on the Dean’s plug as well.

Solder the new connector into place, make sure to double check the polarity is correct before plugging a battery in. Now slide the heat shrink tubing down over the terminals and heat them up with a lighter to seat/shrink them.

Here you can see I have a few older small 2S lipo packs that I will be using for this stage of this build.

Next modification I made was the jump to XR10 beadlock wheels and our sticky R35 compound Ripsaw tires. The difference in traction between these tires and the stock tires is unreal. I couldn’t scrape up a new set for this build so I borrowed my old set off the Project Backyard Basher Ridgecrest build. I also added some weight to the front wheels. This helps keep the front tires planted on steep climbs.

The Vanquish wheel weights slide right into the stock XR10 wheels.

Last modification for this round was a fresh new Ridgecrest body. I kept the paint job simple to show off the body lines a little better. A few shots of this build in it’s current state.

That takes care of Stage 2. I will try to shoot some video of this build as it sits now, before I move on to Stage 3. Stay tuned!!

Link – Stage One Ridgecrest Build
Link – Stage Three Ridgecrest Build

The video is up!!

Bender’s AX10 Ridgecrest Stage 1

As some of you may have seen I recently built up a new Axial Ridgecrest dubbed “Project Backyard Basher”. It was built for all around bashing, trail running and a little light duty crawling without adhering to any rules or specifications. I have been having a lot of fun with it in it’s current state. But, I also wanted to build another one up for entry level competitions. These competitions require your rig to fit certain criteria, like having a maximum wheelbase of 12 1/2″ for the 2.2 comp class. I wanted to do this build in a few different stages starting with some very basic mods and eventually evolve that into a hardcore crawler, with durability in mind. While the Ridgecrest is pretty stout right out of the box, I want to take it even further with vital option parts in key areas. Those modifications will come later though. For now, I want to see how capable I make this rig just spending a little time at the workbench. So, let’s get started!

The new Ridgecrest that was recently liberated from it’s box.

First thing I wanted to do was get as much weight over the front axle as possible. To do that I swapped the battery tray and electronics tray around so the battery will be in front. Start be removing the four screws that hold the battery tray in place.

Once all four screws have been removed, pull the battery tray out of the chassis.

A shot of the chassis after removing the battery tray.

Next we will have to remove the electronics tray. Start by unscrewing the top cap on the radio box.

Now remove the last two screws that hold the top half of the radio box in place.

Flip the top half of the radio box up and unplug the ESC and servo. It is important to pay attention when you unplug everything so you know how it goes back together.

Remove the wire routing tab from the motor wires.

Unplug the motor wires.

Then remove the wire routing tab for the on/off switch.

Remove the power switch.

Then remove the 4 screws holding the electronics tray in place, and remove the electronics tray.

An overall shot of the chassis with both trays removed.

Time to re-assemble. Start with the battery tray and bolt it into place out front where the electronics tray was located.

Re-install the electronics tray next. You will notice the servo wire lead is probably too short to plug back into the receiver now. No big deal, you will just need to spend a few bucks for a servo extension wire. This is basically an extension cord for your servo wire. Plug the servo lead into the female end of the extension, plug the other end into your receiver and you are ready to go. Notice I have already plugged everything back into it’s required place. Route the antenna wire out the top half of the radio box, and run the servo and ESC wires in from the top.

Here’s a shot of the servo extension I used.

I also moved the power switch to the opposite side of the chassis from the stock location, just to keep wires neatly routed along the chassis plates. Use the wire routing tab for the on/off switch and the steering servo wire.

The servo extension plugged into the steering servo.

Now install the first two screws that hold the top half of the radio box. Make sure your wires are neatly tucked in and clear of being pinched between the two halves of the box.

Grab the top cap for the radio box and route the antenna wire through the cap from the bottom.

Secure the top cap with the last two screws.

Plug the motor wires back together and secure them to the chassis plate with the wire routing tab.

Another overall shot of the chassis now that the battery tray is out front.

Next thing I wanted to improve upon is the ride height. I wanted to lower the overall stance of this Ridgecrest to help with off camber obstacles. This was also a simple no cost modification because you can flip the lower link mount/lower shock mounts on the axles to lower your ride height a little. First, remove your wheel and tire from the corner of the truck you are working on. Now you can clearly see the lower link/shock mount.

Remove the screws holding the lower link and shock to the axle bracket.

Using a 2.5mm driver, remove the screws that hold the bracket into place on the axle.

Flip the bracket 180 degrees and re-install on the axle.

Re-attach your lower link and shock to the bracket.

In an effort to lower the ride height even more, I moved the upper shock mounts to the inner most hole on the side plates.

Another inexpensive modification I made was going to softer shock springs. I installed our “Black” comp springs which are the softest we make. This will help the suspension conform to the terrain better.

Last thing I am going to do for this installment is cut the stock tires for better forward bite. The stock RTR Ripsaw tires are quite a bit harder than our soft R35 compound Ripsaw tires. So, cutting the stock tires is an inexpensive way to get a little better performance. I went around all 4 tires and cut the smallest row of lugs out using a pair of wire cutters. A shot of the stock Ripsaw tread pattern.

Use the wire cutters to cut the small center row of lugs away from the tire.

Now do the same for the small outer lugs.

A shot of the tire tread after removing the tread blocks.

You can also cut the existing sipes/grooves in the center lugs deeper with a Dremel and cutoff wheel for better off camber performance.

A shot of the finished tire. Another mod you can make to soften the stock tires is to open up the breather holes in the wheels. I used a 1/4″ drill bit and open up the existing holes to help the tires breath better and conform to the rocks.

Here’s how the stance on this rig sits now.

That does it for Stage 1 of this build. These few mods will help the overall crawling capability of a Ridgecrest right out of the box. Stay tuned for Stage 2 which will be coming soon!!

Link – Stage Two Ridgecrest Build
Link – Stage Three Ridgecrest Build