SCX10 II Handling Adjustment – $3 Shock Mod

SCX10II_HandlingAdjustment

We’re guessing by now you’ve logged a lot of miles on your SCX10 II ready to run rig. The truck has probably served you well tackling new terrain wherever your adventure takes you. So what’s next? How about improving your rig for better handling on those to tough to conquer trails. The stock out of the box SCX10 II is set up for general scale trail use, but the highly capable platform can improve as you improve and the tuning trick we’re about to show you will cost you just a few bucks and will take less than ten minutes of your time to complete. What we’re going to do here is lower the CG of the SCX10 II by simply relocating the lower shock mounting point. The shock end comes mounted to the axle on its own mounting boss. But, by relocating it to the same mounting point as the lower link, it lowers the overall Center Of Gravity of the chassis and a lower COG equals better handling. Let’s get started!

WHAT YOU NEED
axa120
3x25mm Button Head Machine Screw- AXA120
3mm Thin Nylon-Lock Nut- AXA1052 (Optional)
Basic hobby tools- 2.0mm hex driver, wheel nut wrench and long nose pleirs

Step 1
SCX Shock Mod 1
Let’s get the easy stuff out of the way. Remove the wheel nut caps, wheel nuts, wheels and lower shock mount screws from all four corners of your SCX10 II.

Step 2
SCX Shock Mod 2
Now, remove the screw that secures the link to the axle and place it in your spare hardware bin.

Step 3
SCX Shock Mod 3
Take the new long 3x25mm button head screw that you spent a whole $3 on and insert it through the shock end, into the axle mount with the link in place and screw it all the way in.

Step 4 (Option)
SCX Shock Mod 4
The screw will be secure as it has been screwed into the plastic axle mounting boss. But if you want to go one step further in security to make sure that screw doesn’t back out, you can add a thing 3mm Ny-Lock nut to the end of the screw. Tighten the nut snug.

Step 5
Repeat Step 2-4 for the remaining shock/ link points.

Step 6
Reinstall your wheels, nuts and caps.

SEE THE DIFFERENCE
SCX Shock Mod 6
You can see above, the left shock is in the stock location and the right shock has been relocated to the new position in-line with the lower link. The axle is also visibly lowered on the right side in the photo. Once all four shocks have been relocated and the truck turned upright, the chassis will now be lower in comparison to the stock position.

BACK TO THE TRAIL
Now you’re ready to head back out and try and navigate some of those tough terrain features that may have defeated you prior. With the lower CG, your rig will benefit from the modification. Keep in mind, this will not be a night and day difference. You still need to choose your lines and wheel speed wisely. Make sure you keep checking back to the Axial blogs as we’ll continue to offer tuning secrets to help your SCX10 II improve as you improve. #AxialPerformance

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod
The Axial AX90066 Deadbolt is an extremely popular body style, and we’re constantly pulling spare plastic out of our parts bins to try and create a few simple body mods.

The first is something we’ve been asked about for a long time – why doesn’t the Deadbolt come with a rear bumper. Well, say no more – check out this great little how to on adding a simple rear bumper to the back of your Deadbolt.

TOOLS NEEDED:
1. 1.5mm Hex Wrench
2. 2.0mm Hex Wrench
3. Side cutters
4. Dremel (to help clean up the bumper)

LIST OF PARTS USED:
AX80125 Axial SCX10 Poison Spyder JK Brawler Lite Front Bumper

Step 1

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod
Here are the two parts we’ll be installing; a front bumper and bumper mount. We’ll use the original hardware included with your Deadbolt to re-mount the parts.

Step 2

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod
Using the side cutters, clip the hoop off the bumper. Here’s where you can use the Dremel to clean up the bumper. If you have a thin pair of side cutters, you might be able to clip close to the bumper and not require any Dremel work.

Step 3

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod
Remove the stock rear bumper and install the AX80125 mount. Use the stock hardware to lock it in place.

Step 4

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod
Slide your freshly modified rear bumper into the mount and secure with the stock hardware.

Step 5

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod
Set your body on top and examine your handiwork. Your Deadbolt now has a rear bumper that even includes light buckets!

Step 6

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod
But wait – there’s more! If you have a set of D-rings lying around, you can add those to the rear bumper to help pull your buddies out if they get stuck!


This second mod came about after a couple of us found that getting to the rear body clips can be a bit of a pain if you have chunky hands. This mod will not only make it super easy to get to them, it also give provisions for adding a scale rear tire.

TOOLS NEEDED:
1. 2.0mm Hex Wrench
2. Side cutters
3. Dremel (to help clean up the bumper)

LIST OF PARTS USED:
AXA0147 M3x16mm Hex Socket Flat Head Screw
AXA1052 M3 Thin Nylon Locking Hex Nut
AXA0422 M2.6x6mm Hex Socket Tapping Button Screw
AX31305 TT-380 Rear Lower Cage and Tire Retainer
AX80130 Roll Cage Sides

Step 1

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod
Remove the body – as you can see, it’s a little tough getting to the rear body pins with sausage fingers.

Step 2

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod
Here are the parts you’ll need. Any spare tire will work with this mod (as long as it’s a 1.9). It’s also suggested that you remove the foam insert as well. You’ll see more about this later.

Step 3

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod
Mount the tire to the cage by inserting your 16mm screw through the washer, then through the tire. Note the orientation of the mount; this setup mounts the tire low in the bed for the best performance. If you want to allow a little more room for, say, some scale items, flip the plastic mount as shown in the picture below (you’ll need at least a 30mm screw to attach the rear tire).

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod

Step 4

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod
Secure the tire in place with a M3 locknut. If you’re feeling really sassy, you can use the AX31320 Axial Bomber Rear Tire Hold Down for a super trick look!

Step 5

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod
Remove the screws from the stock cage (see the pretty red arrows). Make sure you remove them from BOTH sides of the Deadbolt.

Step 6

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod
Using the side cutters, chop off the rear part of the cage as shown. You can use a Dremel here to clean up the cut or just leave it be.

Step 7

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod
Attach your rear tire mount to the cage, flip it up and secure with the M2.6×6 screws. Tightening these down will help keep the rear cage in place, just be sure not to over-tighten them.

Step 8

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod
Lower the cage all the way to the body, and ‘pinch’ the tire in-between the cage. This is where a tire without the foam insert will help hold the flip-cage in place a little better.

Step 9

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod
Now, swing the cage up to install the body pins. Brilliant, right?

Skeeno’s Axialfest 2018 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Build

After AXIALFEST2017, I started thinking that I needed to update my trailing rig.  Last year, I built a new racer for for the Altra Ultra 5K Enduro, but I needed something new to run on all the trials at AXIALFEST2018.

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As luck would have it, Brown Santa dropped off some Green Tape just before the Christmas season.  Merry Christmas to me!

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When I opened up the box, it was packed with the new SCX10 2 2017 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited CRC.  This would be a great new trailing rig for AXIALFEST2018!

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My buddy, Mr. Werty over at WertyMade contacted me as soon as he found out I had the new rig.  He wanted to use it as a test mule for some parts he was making; rear bumpers, front bumpers, and rock sliders. Since we’ve been RC nerd friends for many years, I happily agreed to lend him my new trailing rig.

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He returned it to me in even better than tip top shape.  All the parts he test fitted, he left on there for me, score!  I immediately started thinking about the things I wanted to modify and add to improve the performance and looks of the 2017 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited CRC. First up was to get a spare tire and some RotopaX on the rear bumper.

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Mr. Werty repossessed those D Rings, so that was one item I wanted to replace on that sweet front stinger.

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Check out those sweet sliders, indexed to hold the body, just like the stock plastic ones, but these are made out of steel.  The wrench logo in a nice touch, too.

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Next up was a new set of socks and shoes.  I’ve always liked beadlocks and the classic Axial 1.9 Beadlocks were my first choice.  Just as I got the wheels, Werty annouced these new Wrench Rings, and I just had to have a set.

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Look how awesome the rings look.

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In order to add a little crawling performance, I like to add some weight in the wheels to lower the center of gravity.  The Axial Internal Rings are a perfect fit. I also swapped out to a slightly beefier looking tire, the BFG All-Terrains are a classic tire and the KO2 version is even better than the original.

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They mount up easily, and you can adjust the weight using the inserts.

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At this point, I was loving this wheel/tire/ring combo, but I wasn’t digging looking at the electronics through the wheel wells.

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It was starting to look pretty good, but I still had a ways to go.

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Next up, I needed to add some swag to the rear.

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Since I wasn’t using the stock Nitto Trail Grabbers, I pressed one into service as the spare tire.

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Next, I hit up my local hobby shop, CKRC Hobbies and picked up these RotopaX gas cans from Scale by Chris AKA SBC.

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Don’t worry, the tire rack swings away, so you can still get into the back of the Jeep.

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Another modification I like to do is the 3654 Mod to the wheel hexes.  Eazy Elio from Two Chainz Scalerz taught me this trick to give any Axial scaler a slighly wider stance. Since the stock hexes are about 3mm, this modification adds about 10mm of width to the SCX10 2.

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While I was at CKRC picking up the SBC RotopaX cans, I spotted these brass 8mm hexes from Team KNK. It might be slight, but the brass hexes will also lower the center of gravity slighty.

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They fit perfectly and come with new wheel nuts and set screws to secure them to the axles.

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Next up was adding some wheel wells to hide the electronics.  I used the wheel wells for the original SCX10.

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They aren’t a perfect fit, but with a little creativity with the scissors, they worked out pretty well.

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The curve of the Jeep Wrangler body means you have to trim the fronts quite a bit.

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I ended up trimming that front tab off because I was worried it would hang up on twigs and things on the trail.

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After a little black paint, they look great.

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Black helps hide all the imperfections.

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That’s WAY better than before; no more unsightly wires can be seen under there.

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I almost forgot to mention this cool feature on the WertyMade bumper. Those four holes are for mounting a rear winch if you want one…

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And that hole is a bottle opener for those times when you need to hydrate during wrenching sessions!

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Next, it was time to add a some interior to give it a little more scale look, as well as to hide the electronics a little more.  I heard from the Anthony Rivas of Rivas Concepts and Matt Kett from the Scale Builders Guild that the 2012 Jeep Wrangler body was a perfect fit.

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Sadly, I had to kill a perfectly good body.  If you want to try this, you can probably find an old body from one of your local RC buddies to cut up.

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Be sure to cut around the lights and fender flares.

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The rear view mirror mounting holes make a great mounting point.  The two screws hold the front securely.

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I found that the door handle impressions lined up perfectly and made getting it in evenly easy.

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I cut a big hole to allow for the rear body mounts to pass through.

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Don’t worry, with the tinted rear windows, you can only see it if you are staring directly into the rear windows.

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Looking good so far. Time for paint.

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I wavered between black, red, and silver before settling on the silver.  I was happy with my choice because the bright color makes the interior pop against the red.

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That’s what I’m talking about.  No more unsightly electrics can be seen in there.

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Earlier, I got distracted by that big open space in the front bumper. TIme to remedy that.

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I pulled the winch off my old SCX10 and it mounted up easily.  It even had a matching red hook.

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Oh yeah! that looks way better with the winch in there.

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I found some D rings on some old parts trees to replace the ones Mr. Werty repossessed. I even put one on the rear bumper.

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Back to the interior.  Sticker time!

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I kept it pretty simple in here.  The only thing I added was the steering wheel I had in my parts box.  Low Rider Style with the chain ring.

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Boom!

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Bam! The silver and black really contrasts well against the red.

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There it is mounted up, two screws through the mirror holes and a little tape hold it in.

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There’s the mirror screws holding the mirrors on and the interior in.

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I also found some wipers on the spare parts tree and mounted them up.

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I really like the clean looks of it.

51 She’s just about ready to conquer all the trails at AXIALFEST2018!

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I just wanted to add a couple more scale details.  First I added the molded door handles.

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A bonus of the door handles is they also hold the interior in place.

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Then, I added the molded hood latches.  Both of these come on the spare parts trees in the box.

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I had to give it a quick trail run to test it out.

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I must say, this rig handles amazingly well.

58I’m thinking this rig is going to be amazing at AXIALFEST2018!

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One last item before I wrap up this build.  I need a few more lumens than the stock headlights, so I decided to add the JRC Offroad Roof Rack.

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Looks pretty good up there even though it’s originally meant for the 2000 Jeep Cherokee.

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The Rigid Light Bar fits perfectly up there.

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I used the 8 String LED and 3 Port High Output LED Controller.

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I’m really loving the look and capabilities of this rig.

 

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I’m definitely ready to emark on the adventures that Axialfest 2018 holds. I just wish July 18th would get here already!

 

Axialfest Trail Rig Prep

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Before you know it, Axialfest will be upon us and the last thing you want to worry about is preparing just a few days before you embark on your adventure. You want to have your adventure vehicle ready to go and ready to take on the terrain without failure ahead of time. Yes, Axial vehicles are built tough, but taking the time to have your rig ready will ensure more fun on the trail. We’ve gathered up a number of tips to help get your rig ready from what hardware to use, to driveline tips and things you may need along the way.

AF18 Trail Prep4

Hardware Check

Set-Screws- Set-screws can be a headache in the RC world, they are used in several areas on just about any rig. The most common is the pinion gear. If the set-screw goes into metal, it’s a good idea to add some blue thread locking compound to it before installing it. The thread locking compound is a measure to ensure the screw doesn’t back out during use.

Lock-nut- Early SCX10’s used standard nuts in several locations and perhaps you’ve installed a nut or two along the way while working on or customizing your truck. Consider swapping out all standard nuts with ny-lock nuts. These nuts have a plastic insert ring that helps prevent the nut from backing off of the screw.

Machine Screws- Machine screws have a much finer thread than a self-tapping screw. This finer thread often offers more “bite” into a part for extra security. Consider using machines screws wherever you can. And like that pesky set-screw, always use blue thread-locking compound on machine screws that go into metal so they don’t vibrate out while in use.

AF18 Trail Prep3

Driveline Tips

Screw Pins- Screw pins are often used to secure the universal yokes to the axle drive pinions, if your rig doesn’t have them and you have a through-hole in the bevel pinion shaft, go with a screw-pin instead of a set-screw. This will ensure drive instead of a set-screw that can back out and slip. Use thread-lock here too of course.

Universals- We’ve seen some torn-up universals in our day. These components take a lot of abuse. Replacing the cross-pins before your many Axialfest adventures can be a good idea. At the very least, check your universals for binding or regrease them if they look dry.

Bearings- Do you want to be “The Squeaky Guy?” Bearings take a lot of abuse and as they get covered in dirt or submerged in water, you risk the chance of bearing failure. If you hear squeaking, consider cleaning your bearings, blast them with a cleaner and re-oil them. Some go so far as to repack the bearing with grease. A bad bearing can eventually wreak havoc on your driveline on the trail. Fix it before it causes other possibly more expensive problems.

Gears- This is an important topic here. Many of crunchy transmissions have been heard along the trails at Axialfest. During your pretrip check, take a look at all of the gears. Do any look sharp, missing parts of their teeth, is your gearcase full of metal dust? Don’t leave it to a trail run to find our you needed to replace gears. In the axles, make sure the gear lash is correct between the bevel pinion and ring gear. Shims may be used to adjust gear lash. Inside of the center transmission, make sure your gears are well lubricated with grease. If you do have plastic internal gears, on your SCX10, consider upgrading to the metal gears, here is the link for the upgrade: HERE And finally, your pinion and spur. Make sure your mesh is correct, not too loose that your gears can skip and not too tight that it binds.

Slipper- Your slipper clutch is often the line of defense to protecting your transmission. When your rig gets caught up in a gap in the rocks and you pin the throttle, the slipper will slip rather than the gears skipping. You want the slipper tight enough so you get through gnarly obstacles, but you do need that slip for protection. A little trial and error works here in terms of setting. Always lean toward the loose side to start with.

Grease- As mentioned above a number of times. Grease, grease grease. Grease the gears, consider greasing the bearings, add grease to metal shafts inside of the axles, grease universal joints. Grease will keep these parts smooth and offer some protection from the elements.

AF18 Trail Prep2

Waterproof Everything

Specific Electronics- Axialfest is known to have some water encounters and as you know water and electronics don’t mix. Most ready to run electronics are waterproof or water resistant but if you’re running something from an older build date or have swapped out your electronics for something non-WP, you might consider taking some precautions to waterproofing your equipment. Seal the servo case with silicone, put a bead of grease around servo output shafts. ESC’s are a bit more difficult to waterproof using silicone as the heatsink area is an area where water can get in. Brushed motors can get wet, just prep by oiling the bearings or bushings.

Radio Box Sealing- The radio box is often the home for items that can be damaged by water or debris. The receiver, lighting module or winch controller are often placed in radio boxes. But water can still get inside unless you seal it up. Use a bead of silicone or grease to seal off any gaps that will allow water to enter the box.

Axialfest night

Light It Up

Why You Need Them- Some of the best adventures on the rocks at Cisco Grove happen at night. The night driving element is very challenging and you’ll see drivers out on the rocks until all hours of the morning. You’ll want to consider adding as much lighting to you and your rig as possible.

Options- Headlight and taillight kits are obvious and selecting the right one really depends on the type of body you run. The other option are light bars. Light bars are a pretty simple bolt on light system to install and many plug right into the receiver for power. Another option to consider are well lights. Those are lights in the wheel wells so you can see exactly what type of terrain your rig is going over. There are plenty of lights to choose from in the Axial options list. You can find more on lights: HERE  Then there are the lights for you. A head-lamp is a great source of light to blaze through the trails. Some fashion flashlights to their radios with tape or rubber bands. Get creative with your lights, but whatever you choose, make sure it’s enough to light the way for long periods of time.

AF18 Trail Prep1

What To Carry

Parts Supplies- Beyond prepping your rig for the trails, you should prep for those what if moments. What if a screw falls out, what if a part breaks. It’s a good idea to carry a small parts bin of hardware with you at all times. Pack the bin with an assortment of screws, nuts, set-screws, body pins, flanged bushings for the steering knuckles, axles pins and washers in case something falls off on a run. Next you’ll want to carry some more substantial parts like a spare shock, some spare links, a spare center universal set-up. An extra servo horn or even and extra servo.

Tools- You know those little bags of allen wrenches and the box wrench that came with your kit? They make great lightweight travel tools and can fix most of the issues you’ll have to deal with on your rig. Now granted hand tools make the job easier, carry the basics, 1.5mm, 2.0mm and 2.5mm hex drivers; 5.5mm and 7.0mm nut drivers, long nose pliers, scissors and cutters can also be useful. Place them in a bag and put them in your backpack during your adventure.

Survival- Drivers can spend hours on the trails. Always carry water with you for hydration. Cisco Grove is at a higher elevation and having water on hand will keep you hydrated during your hikes. Also have some nutrition with you. Some power bars, trail mix or other foods can take the edge off your hunger while completing some of the long trail layouts. It’s also good to have a small first aid kit in case you get a scratch or scrape on the trail. Keep your cell phone with you, lights and a suitable back-pack to carry extra batteries is the best way to take on Axialfest.

AF18 Trail Prep5

Prep For Fun

With rig prep out of the way, you should now be able to relax and enjoy the driving and scenery on the trails instead of being concerned your rig can handle the trek. If something does happen along the trails, don’t be shy and ask another driver for help borrow a tool or even a part to keep you going. The attendees at Axialfest are among the best enthusiasts in the industry and meeting new people in the camps or on the trails can turn into new friendships. See you at #AXIALFEST

Suspension Link Types Explained

Suspension_LinkTypes

There is no shortage of suspension design types in the RC world, but for trail trucks and other off-road adventure vehicles, one of the most preferred suspension styles is the link type. Links are typically a long fixed plastic bar or long metal rod with ball-ends on each end that stretch from points on the chassis to the trucks axle. Sounds pretty simple right? There is a bit more to it. There are several link set-up types and Axial vehicles such as the SCX10 and SCX10 II use different type of link setups. There are three different designs used; a 3-Link, 4-Link and a 3-Link with panhard bar setup. Here we’ll go over what each style looks like and their performance attributes.

3-LINK

A 3-Link suspension setup can commonly be found on the front of the SCX10 platform. Two lower links, one on each side, span from the skid to the lower axle tubes. The third link is located up higher to secure the axle from rotating. Here an upper Y-link is used for the third link. It mounts to the frame and spans to a single center point/ mount on the top of the axle.

3-Link Suspension

A 3-Link setup rotates the axle around the moving vertical pivot during articulation and can result in some axle sway.

4-LINK

The 4-Link design is similar to the 3-Link in regard to how the lower links span from the skid-plate to the axle housings in a triangulated format. However the top link is slightly different. The top utilizes two links that span from the inner frame to two pivot points on the top of the axle in the center.

4-Link

The 4-Link suspension design moves in a much linear path than the 3-Link and results in less axle sway, steer and reduces the effects of torque twist.

3-LINK W/ PANHARD

Now, are you ready for the description of a 3-Link with panhard bar? Brace yourselves, it’s actually made up of 4-Links. It’s similar to a “4-Link design” but with one upper link purposely missing. So if you’re one of those people who have opened your kit and said to yourself; Hey a link is missing, it’s not supposed to be there. To prevent the axle from shifting in this style of suspension design, a “panhard” bar is used; the fourth link. A panhard bar runs from the frame perpendicular to the other links and mates up with a mounting boss on the axle carrier.

3-Link With Panhard

This suspension setup offers smooth linear articulation without the axle sway associated with a 3-Link system.

LINK TECH

Although we’ve discussed the different type of link designs in a simple format, there is a bit more to it such as anti-squat, roll center, anti-dive and other tuning options that further differentiate each, but that is for another discussion. The style of links found on your specific SCX10 model are there by design to deliver articulation for optimum performance.

Pick The Right Axial Model For You

What_Model_Style_Right4You

Axial is a company of enthusiasts for enthusiasts. Axial develops extremely high end radio control models of vehicles that you are likely to see in the great outdoors. These models are designed to generate a tremendous amount of reliable fun that can be experienced by the whole family. Whether you are a beginner looking for a new adventure or a seasoned hobby veteran, Axial offers a platform for you to personalize and enjoy in every environment. The Axial team encourages you to get outside and have some family fun! But wait… Which Axial vehicle should you get? Axial offers a selection of orr-road adventure machines and each has their strengths for certain environments. Let’s go over each vehicle and their strengths to help you decide which Axial vehicle is right for you to start with. We have to warn you, it might not be easy to choose, but as your hobby grows there is another selection at Axial to meet your needs.

SCX10

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The SCX10™ platform is an already proven chassis-of-choice for scale enthusiasts around the globe. If you can hike there, your SCX10™ will drive there! With today’s efficient motor and long lasting batteries, you are only limited by your imagination and/or your physical readiness to adventure out onto a hike while driving your SCX10™. It’s a great way to get in touch with nature and spend time with friends and family while having a ton of fun doing so!
The SCX10 features a tough metal c-channel frame, proven axle design, low-CG transmission, ready to run electronics that has the power to tackle rough trail driving and backyard bashing. The SCX10 is topped off by a body that screams go for an adventure and licensed tires are ready to grip any surface.

WHO IS IT FOR: Off-road trail adventurer looking for a vehicle that can reach speeds of a brisk walking pace.
KIT OR RTR: Ready To Run
PRICE RANGE: $299.99
STYLES: AX90044 SCX10™ Deadbolt™

SCX10 II

Pick The Right Axial 13 Pick The Right Axial 14
The SCX10™ II is the culmination of many years of development, furthering aesthetic realism while maximizing trail performance. The SCX10™ II features an all-metal twin c-channel frame rails, but that’s only 2% of the 98% of a completely new design. Scale AR44™ high pinion axles, a chassis mounted servo (CMS), re-designed transmission, front mounted battery tray, all aluminum suspension links, and a properly designed suspension for nearly zero bump steer. These are just a few of the features built into the all new SCX10™ II.

WHO IS IT FOR: Like the SCX10, the SCX10 II is for the Off-road trail adventurer looking for a vehicle that can reach speeds of a brisk walking pace and tackle terrain that is a bit more aggressive.
KIT OR RTR: Kit and Ready To Run
PRICE RANGE: $329.99 to $409.99
STYLES: AX90059 SCX10 II™ Trail Honcho, AX90060 SCX10 II™ 2017 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited CRC, AX90047 SCX10 II™ 2000 Jeep® Cherokee, AX90046 SCX10 II™ 2000 Jeep® Cherokee – Kit

YETI Jr.

Pick The Right Axial 5 Pick The Right Axial 9
With the Yeti Jr.™ SCORE® Trophy Truck® – RTR, everything that existing Axial drivers have come to love and appreciate in the Yeti chassis, has been incorporated into a machine only now in 1/18th scale. It’s powered by a 380-sized brushed motor which provides the perfect amount of torque and speed for this tiny Trophy Truck® monster. Also featuring an all-in-one programmable Tactic ESC and receiver, paired with a 3-wire micro high torque steering servo. At the end of the day, the goal was to build a simple, fun, and easy to drive Yeti that anyone can handle. The hardest part about the Yeti Jr.™ SCORE® Trophy Truck® is making sure you have enough battery packs charged in order to keep the adventure alive!

WHO IS IT FOR: For those working with smaller running spaces but still demand maximum terrain bashing performance.
KIT OR RTR: Ready To Run Only
PRICE RANGE: $159.99
STYLES: AX90052 Yeti Jr.™ SCORE® Trophy Truck®, AX90054 Yeti Jr.™

YETI 1/10-

Pick The Right Axial 8

Pick The Right Axial 7

Available in kit or ready to run form, the Yeti™ SCORE® Trophy Truck® is a purposely engineered desert truck with a solid rear axle and independent front suspension. Make no bones about it, this is not a short course truck nor is it designed for the sugar coated and manicured racetracks of R/C. This Trophy Truck is designed for the roughest of conditions and REAL DIRT. We beg for the dirt and rocks to be brought back to off-road! There are reasons why full size Trophy Trucks feature the four link suspension design; durability, capability, and improved forward bite without sacrificing suspension travel. Full-size Trophy Trucks inspired the distinct aesthetic and technical elements of this truck, right down to the solid rear axle. The retro inspired body features design queues from a 1960’s era roof-line, classic 1970’s wheel arches and glass shapes from the 1980’s. Giving this kit an extra bit of modern contrast comes in the form of fluorescent orange Method 105 wheels. This kit version will accept standard 1/10th scale brushed and brushless 4-pole systems and most major stick pack batteries. Precision machined aluminum shocks are standard equipment and deliver smooth suspension movement for consistent handling.

WHO IS IT FOR: The Yeti is exactly what it sounds like, a beast on the terrain. This off-road performer is fast and can handle anything from loose dirt to rugged rocky surfaces.
KIT OR RTR: Kit or Ready To Run
PRICE RANGE:
STYLES: AX90068 Yeti™ SCORE® Trophy Truck®, AX90050 Yeti™ SCORE® Trophy Truck®, AX90025 Yeti™ buggy kit, AX90026 Yeti™ RTR

YETI ⅛-

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The Axial Yeti XL™ Monster Buggy – a new category, a new frontier, a new dimension. From the beginning of the concept through the design phase, we drew upon our brand philosophy to develop and deliver something different to the R/C monster truck arena. Monster trucks are known for bashability, so we jumped head first into the segment by creating a vehicle with insane brushless power along with features that would allow it to withstand the abuse that comes with the territory. From the outset, the goal of maintaining brand heritage was a priority. Our research and development team took those traits and attributes, mixed them with the Axial design ethos which is heavily rooted in full size rock racing, and developed what could be considered the next level in R/C monster truck design.

WHO IS IT FOR: Size matters and if you need to go big, go bold and have loads of power on tap to obliterate the terrain than the Yeti XL is the perfect fit for your aggressive driving nature.
KIT OR RTR: Kit
PRICE RANGE: $499.99
STYLES: AX90038 Yeti™ XL Buggy

RR10

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The RR10 Bomber is a build-it-yourself kit and is offered in ready to run form too and is considered the ultimate rock racer! The kit version features hard anodized aluminum suspension links, hard anodized aluminum steering links, long travel rear sway bar, hardened steel universal axles allowing up to 50 degrees of steering, aluminum lower link plates, and King adjustable machined aluminum shocks, all riding on sticky BFGoodrich® Baja T/A® KR2 tires wrapped around 2.2 Walker Evans Racing beadlock wheels. We’ve also included heavy duty bevel gears in the front and rear axles for improved gear mesh, and increased strength.

WHO IS IT FOR: Want to get the experience of driving like the rigs you see at the King Of Hammers, but without the price tag of the full scale machine or the build hours. The RR10 can deliver the excitement of raw power and rock thrashing, just on a smaller scale.
KIT OR RTR: Kit or Ready To Run
PRICE RANGE: $359.99- $399.99
STYLES: AX90053 RR10 Bomber Kit, AX90048 RR10 Bomber RTR

WRAITH

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The Wraith™ Ready-to-Run 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD Rock Racer is another “FIRST” for Axial with the first and most realistic full tube-frame chassis design that is manufactured with high strength composite materials. The Wraith™ IS BUILT TO GO FAST and is not just a low speed rock crawler. Each style of Wraith is packed with performance features and option parts that you add as you build it. The virtually bulletproof AR60 OCP axles are ready to take the Spawn through its paces whether blasting through the wide open desert or hammering its way through the toughest rock trails. The 2.2 Maxxis Trepador tires are a proven true grip standard, wrapped around industry proven Method IFD™ beadlock wheels. Whether you are rock racing or backyard bashing, the Wraith™ Spawn is ready for action.

WHO IS IT FOR: Looking for the best of many off-road worlds? The Wraith is a proven rock racer that can also dominate the hiking trails with high speed performance and suspension that adapts to a variety of environments.
KIT OR RTR: Kit or Ready To run
PRICE RANGE: $329.99- $399.99
STYLES: AX90045 Wraith Spawn, AX90031 Jeep® Wrangler Wraith-Poison Spyder Rock Racer, AX90018 Wraith RTR, AX90056 Wraith Spawn Kit

SMT10

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Monster trucks are a never ending automotive attraction that captures anyone’s attention and the trucks featured in Monster Jam®. Axial went all out when designing the chassis and roll cage for the SMT10™ Monster Jam® Truck. Very similar to modern era full size monster trucks, this chassis was developed for maximum strength and an extremely detailed appearance. The truck also features tough AR60, long travel aluminum body shocks, licensed BKT tires and the styling to ensure you have a true mini Monster Jam experience.

WHO IS IT FOR: If you’re determined to crush anything in your RC vehicles path from a row of cans, backyard flower beds or just go out for some general big wheel bashing, the SMT10 can handle anything you would expect from a Monster Jam style truck.
KIT OR RTR: Ready To Run Only
PRICE RANGE: $329.99
STYLES: AX90057 MAX-D Monster Jam Truck, AX90055 Grave Digger Monster Jam Truck

SCX10 II Trail Honcho Truck Tips & Tricks For Noobs

TrailTruck_Tips&Tricks

Getting your RC adventure underway has never been easier with the well equipped, affordable SCX10 II Trail Honcho ready to run. This revival of the original Honcho body, from the famed SCX10, now features an updated electronics package combined with improved SCX10 II platform. It’s aimed at getting anyone into the hobby and on the trails with success. It of course is also a great truck for the seasoned enthusiast. But our focus here is on the many who will pick up an RC transmitter for the first time with the Trail Honcho and we want their first adventure to be the best of many trail driving experiences to come. Here we’ll go over all the basics from the unboxing to checking over your rig for its first run, tips for your first drive and tricks to keep it in proper running order.
Honcho 3

UNBOX
Before just diving into your new RC adventure, take the time to unbox and educate yourself about everything that encompases your new Honcho kit. Inside the box, you’ll need to cut the zip-ties securing the truck to the inner box support. Remove the radio from it’s packaging and dip into the bag with instructions and accessories. The most important step here is to read the manual. Although we’re walking you through the paces here, it is always best to familiarize yourself with the manual in case you have any questions in the future. After your up to par with manual, take a look at what is included with the kit. You’ll find a bag of “extra parts” these parts are unused during the assembly of the kit and may be used for future projects once you get hooked on your Axial adventures and trust us, you will get hooked. There will also be some basic tools in the kit, these should be transferred to your adventure backpack as they make great tools for on-trail repairs. And finally you’ll notice some green “domes” we’ll talk about this later.

Honcho 2
Honcho 1

GET IT RUNNING
We’re moving onto the fun part; getting your Honcho going. First remove the four body clips that secure the body to the chassis, remove the body completely and set it aside. Now you can access the battery tray. At some point at your local hobby shop or online, you’ve purchased a battery and charger for the rig. Locate the battery tray and unhook the Velcro strap. Slide your charged battery into the tray and secure the velcro back in place to retain the battery. Next move to the transmitter and install four AA batteries that you supply into the radio. Power the radio on using the switch on the face of the radio. Now move back to the SCX10 II and plug in the battery. The battery plug is your on/off switch for the truck. Tip: The radio is always on first and off last. Your SCX10 II is now powered up and ready to go after placing the body back on the truck and securing it with the four clips.

Honcho 4 Honcho 5

RUNNING CHECK
Head outdoors and place the Honcho on the ground for a quick systems check. The electronics should be dialed in from the factory, but things can happen. You’ll want to check to make sure your trims are set properly. First is your truck moving on its own when you power it up? If so, you will need to use the throttle trim on your radio to reset your neutral point. Use either button for throttle trim to find the neutral. If you tap the trim on one side and the truck starts moving more, it means you’ll need to use the opposite button to get the throttle back to neutral. Keep tapping the button until the car stops (is at its neutral point.) With the throttle set, check to see if the truck tracks straight. With the vehicle pointing away from you, give the truck a little throttle. Note if the truck tends to “drift” towards the left or right. If so, use your steering trim to find the neutral point of the steering in a similar fashion to the throttle adjustment.
trim
Honcho SCX10 2

GET THE FEEL
Wait! Now that your truck is trimmed, you probably have the urge to pin the throttle and see what the truck can do. We’ll get there. First start by driving slow in a figure eight pattern. This means giving the truck a little bit of throttle trigger input and steering the truck in a figure eight pattern; turn the wheel right, go straight a bit, turn the wheel to the left, repeat. This will help you get a feel for how the steering feels reversed when coming towards you. When the truck is going away from you, steering the radio wheel to the right will always turn the truck to the right, but will feel reversed coming back towards you. Get a feel for the throttle range in both forwards and reverse. Note: the throttle is not an on/off switch and is proportional. In trail truck driving much of your rock crawling adventures will happen at a slower speed.
Honcho SCX10 7

TACKLE YOUR FIRST OBSTACLE
Before going out and driving on the gnarliest terrain you can find, practice on something less harsh. Find small hills or rocks with a slight incline to drive on. First drive straight up and down the obstacle. Note the amount of throttle it takes to make the incline and how the drag brake in the speed control affects the decline. Next drive up on an angle. Like a real vehicle, the trucks center of gravity may want to cause the truck to roll over. Determining the type of angle you can drive on before the truck wants to roll over is all a part of developing driving skill.

Honcho SCX10 6

DRIVE POINTS
With a general feel of how the Honcho drives, you can venture out for tougher obstacles. Find steeper inclines, off-set rock ledges, varying rock surfaces and use your newfound vehicle control to try and get your truck over the terrain. Think about where the wheels need to be places on rocks, how much steering you need to use, how much throttle and where will the truck be positioned when you’ve tackled what’s in front of you. Remember, you need to set yourself up for the next obstacle too. Then it will become time to refine your lines, challenge yourself and that’s where those little green domes come in that you found in the kit. These green things are gate markers and they are set on trail courses for your rig to pass through. They’re usually placed in positions that will challenge your skill. Find challenging parts on your trial and place these markers so you can practice driving through gates.

Honcho SCX10 3

ROLL OVERS
What happens when your truck rolls over? Well, in real life, if a truck rolls over, no big hand reaches down from the sky to flip it back over. So, you need to use vehicle control to try and right the truck. If the Honcho is completely upside down, try using throttle and steering to “wiggle” the truck over. Or towards a nearby object. The point is to get the wheels to grab onto something to help pull it back over. If the truck is on its side, you can turn into the ground and give it throttle. This will oftentimes pull the truck out of the roll over and back onto its wheels.

Honcho SCX10 5

FIND NEW ADVENTURES
The rest of your driver education is up to you. To improve your skill, try locating nearby parks or even an urban adventure away from the public. Finding new places to have an adventure each time you go out with the Honcho will improve your driving skill. But in the bigger picture, you’re also going out and finding new adventures for yourself. Adventures that will not only build skills and love for a hobby, but will also build memories.
Honcho SCX10 4

MAINTENANCE
Once your adventure outdoors is over, you’re not exactly done with your Honcho rig. A maintained rig is always a well performing rig. Take the time to remove any dirt and debris from the truck. A simple 2” paintbrush and a little elbow grease knocking off dirt from the truck can clean it up. Compressed air works as well. If your adventure lead you into the wetlands, take a look at our Driveline Maintenance Tips to help you with your clean-up procedures.
Honcho SCX10 1

OPTIONS
At some point, You’ll want to join the custom club. Installing option parts to make your honcho stand out or to make it more durable for the adventures you’ll put the rig through. Here are five option parts we recommend you take a look at when taking your SCX10 II Honcho to the next level.  

Gear Set (48P 28T, 48P 52T)
Part- AX31585
If you read the story of the Honcho taking on the Redonda Ridge Adventure, you saw the rough terrain eventually took its toll on the transmission gears. Luckily this is an inexpensive upgrade up to steel gears if you feel your truck needs it.

Aluminum Servo Horn 25T (Hard Anodized)
Part- AX30836
The steering is among one of the most abused parts of any vehicle. Swapping the stock plastic servo horn for the aluminum option could prevent any unwanted steering issues on the trail.

M4 Serrated Nylon Lock Nut
Part- AXA1046
For obvious reasons the wheels endure a lot of abuse during use. This on occasion can lead to a wheel nut backing off. The locking serrated nuts grab onto the wheels for extra security.

SCX10 TR Links Set – 12.3″ (313mm) WB
Part- AX30550
Although the links on the SCX10 II Honcho have been greatly improved over the previous units on the SCX10, upgrading to aluminum links is a popular upgrade for many adventurers.

Steering Upgrade Kit
Part- AX30426
Like the suspension links, the stock plastic steering link can take a lot of abuse and flex during use. In this set, you can use the long link to upgrade your SCX10 II.

Honcho SCX10 7
KEEP IT INTERESTING
With your new found hobby and new found key to adventure, keep things interesting by continuing to drive on new trails, build new courses in your backyard, continually modify and upgrade your Honcho to reflect you, your likes and interests. Every day is a new adventure behind the wheel of the Honcho and can give you new found enjoyment outdoors while learning new sets of skill. When you do conquer a new challenge, be certain to document your experience with a photo on social media and give it the hashtag #AxialAdventures so other adventurers can see what you’re up to.

 

Schultz Lab Magnetic Body Mounting How To

SecureABodyWithMagnets

Strange things happen in the mind of John Schultz and many times there are some great results from those endless random thoughts. Sure, you may have heard of his epic trail builds at Axialfest, but a recent mind melt session in the Schultz Lab yielded a great how to on setting up your body for a super scale look using magnets to secure the shell. Photos were pinched, helpful tips jotted down and we’re going to pass along the information so you can mount your next body sans body clips.
Axial Body Mount 2

STEP 1
Axial Body Mount 5

First things first. Don’t drill any body mounting holes in your freshly painted body. Place the body on your rig and get a feel for where it needs to be positioned.

STEP 2
Axial Body Mount 3

You’ll need to determine where the magnets need to be placed on the inside of the body. There are several ways to do this. Some people put a small dot of paint on the top of the body posts or some black marker so it transfers to the body to designate the body mount locations. John Shultz uses a dab of peanut butter and then eats the rest of the jar. Some bodies do have dimples molded in the body to identify the mounting points and these can of course be used too.

STEP 3
Axial Body Mount 4

If you do use peanut butter, er um, marker to transfer your body mount points, press down firmly to transfer the “substance” to the body.

STEP 4
Axial Body Mount 10

Now it’s time to find some magnets that can be used to secure the body. John found these 1/2″ x 1/4″ x 1/8″ Neodymium Ring Magnets that fit perfectly on the SCX10 II body posts.

STEP 5
Axial Body Mount 11

Once you’re satisfied with the fit of the magnets on the posts, place a small amount of 5-minute 2-part epoxy to the base of the body mounts and slide the magnets onto the posts.

STEP 6
Axial Body Mount 12

Once the epoxy has cured, use a pair of side cutters to cut the top of the post off so it will allow the magnet, that will be secured to the body, to sit on the post magnet.

STEP 7
Axial Body Mount 9

Now it’s time to secure the magnets to the body. Use the epoxy to secure the magnets to the body. Make certain that the mark you made on the body in STEPS 2 & 3 is in the center of the magnet holes. Use some packing tape to help secure the magnets while the epoxy dries. This is a critical step. You don’t want the magnets to move and then the epoxy dries and you have no way to move the mount. A magnet that moves during this step will most likely result in the body not sitting properly on the chassis.

Axial Body Mount 15

Here you can see the magnets epoxied to the roof which was done prior to John installing his interior. Once the epoxy has dried on all of the magnets, you’re ready to drop the body on your chassis with the ease of magnets holding it in place. Not only will the body be held firmly in place, but it also looks much more scale without body posts and its super easy to take the body off for battery swaps or turning the truck on and off.

INTERIOR TIP
Axial Body Mount 6

You may have noticed in some photos that an interior was installed in the 2017 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited CRC body. To do this, John took a 2012 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon Body and cut the exterior off, leaving just the interior and roll cage to secure to the new Jeep Wrangler Unlimited body. The result of course is a more scale looking rig to hit the trails with.

 

SCALE IT UP
With just a little bit of modeling skill, some standard shop tools and some magnets that can be found anywhere online, you can increase the scale look of your machine, while making the chassis easily accessible. It might even become something you’ll want to build a shrine for…

Axial Body Mount 18

 

 

Axial LCX Transmission Parts List

 

lcx-transmission-break-down

Found in: SCX10 II CRC Edition 2017 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited

Stock Gearing
LCX: 32P 13T Pinion / 56T Spur Gear

Axial LCX Tranmission Parts List

Gearing Chart

32 Pitch (Stock Gearing AX30392 or AX30395)

_
Spur Gear

Pinion
56
60
64
68
11
38.69
41.45
44.22
46.98
12
35.47
38.00
40.53
43.07
13
32.74
35.08
37.42
39.75
14
30.40
32.57
34.74
36.91
15
28.37
30.40
32.43
34.45
16
26.60
28.50
30.40
32.30
17
25.04
26.82
28.61
30.40

32 Pitch (Overdrive Gearing AX30401)

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Spur Gear

Pinion
56
60
64
68
11
34.04
36.47
38.90
41.33
12
31.20
33.43
35.66
37.89
13
28.80
30.86
32.91
34.97
14
26.74
28.65
30.56
32.47
15
24.96
26.74
28.53
30.31
16
23.40
25.07
26.74
28.41
17
22.02
23.60
25.17
26.74

32 Pitch (Underdrive Gearing AX30402)

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Spur Gear

Pinion
56
60
64
68
11
43.78
46.91
50.04
53.16
12
40.13
43.00
45.87
48.73
13
37.05
39.69
42.34
44.98
14
34.40
36.86
39.31
41.77
15
32.11
34.40
36.69
38.99
16
30.10
32.25
34.40
36.55
17
28.33
30.35
32.38
34.40

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AXIAL LCX TRANSMISSION PARTS LIST

AXA0023 M2.6x8mm Cap Head Screw
AXA013 M2x6mm Cap Head Screw
AXA1045 M4 Nylon Locking Flanged Nuts
AXA1218 Bearing 5x10x4mm
AXA1225 Bearing 8x16x5mm
AX30162 Straight Pin
AX30394 20T Drive Gear
AX30413 Slipper Spring
AX30435 Steel Outdrive Shaft Set
AX30190 Shaft
AXA146 M3x12mm Socket Head Screw
AX31026 Slipper Plate
AX31027 Spur Gear 32P 56T
AX31068 Slipper Pad
AX31531 LCX Transmission Case
AX31539 LCX Top Shaft (Coming Soon)
AX31585 Gear Set (48P 28T/ 48P 52T)

SCX10 II Trail Honcho 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD RTR Video Collection

SCX10II_Trail_Honcho_Video Look what’s back, the trail rig that lured so many RC enthusiasts off of the tracks and from backyards to the trails for an off-road adventure. The Trail Honcho again graces the trails, this time with the new SCX10 II platform under the iconic Honcho body. But there is a bit more than meets the eye. The SCX10 II has gone through a few revisions and optimized in a way that still delivers the scale performance enthusiasts desire and now at a price that many will find affordable. The Trail Honcho will get you into the scale off-road scene and the level you take your hobby to is up to you. To get you up to speed on what Youtube’s top influencers are saying about the SCX10 II Trail Honcho, we’ve gathered a collection of videos so you can easily see what these trusted channels have to say about the rig.

Axial Videos

Axial AX90059 SCX10™ II Trail Honcho™ – Hike across Redonda Ridge For the launch, the Axial crew went to great lengths to show you the capability of this new release. The SCX10™ II Trail Honcho™ is the reliable choice for scale trail fun! For the past nine years the SCX10™ has been the staple vehicle platform for scale trail enthusiasts around the world. When it’s you, the trail and your rig, you want the tried, and true. You want real world community tested, hobby shop supported, aftermarket supported with close to ten years of history and scale trail adventures. The Trail Honcho™, built on the SCX10™ II chassis, meets the demands and the rigors of scale trailing miles from home when you need reliability the most! The Redonda Ridge Trail, within the mountains of Big Bear California, is mostly used by off road motorcyclist, and revered as the Malcolm Smith Trail due to it’s technical tenacity. The trail was recently re-visited by one of Axial’s own; part of a crew who had traversed the 9.68 mile OHV trail a few times in the past on motorcycles. The thought came about that it would make for a great SCX10™ proving ground, thus the idea was conceptualized to hike the trail, and put the latest version of the Trail Honcho™ through its paces, to uphold the “Trail Honcho” name by putting it on a “black diamond” trail for full size vehicles. Axial takes toys seriously, plays seriously, and made plans to go the extra mile to showcase the Axial SCX10™ Trail Honcho™ in it’s true, namesake terrain.

Harley Designs

Axial SCX10-2 Trail Honcho RTR AX90059 – First Drive – Pre-Budget Build! Harley Designs has already released a number of videos on the Trail Honcho and detailed  the rig before it was even in his hands in the Budget Build Time! Axial SCX10-II Trail Honcho RTR video. After, he followed up with a first running video during a New Year’s Eve trip. The adventure on the rocks is pretty exciting and filmed from a number of perspectives including some drone shots and backed up with some great music. Harley Designs has also teamed up with Scale Builders Guild for a head to head budget build series on the rig. The number of episodes the Trail Honcho will go through has not yet been announced.

Scale Builders Guild

The Trail Honcho is Back! The Scale Builders Guild drops some knowledge on you about the big changes to the SCX10 II Trail Honcho, first going over the links that so many people are talking about. Mathew of SBG takes and compares an old link to a new link to show the difference between the two. His opinion of the new link? Well, you’ll need to watch it to find out. What we can tease is SBG’s overall opinion: “This is a great entry-level truck to fuel your new RC obsession! It’s got a great price point for an RTR and should be robust enough to tackle any trail.” And finally Mathew goes over a number of other changes to the rig and also talks about the budget build series with Harley Designs, using the Trail Honcho.

Hemistorm RC

LOW BUDGET FUN! – Axial SCX102 Trail Honcho Hemistorm RC dips right into the SCX10 II Honcho and delivers a great overview of the trucks new features and what he likes about the original Honcho. Hemistorm explains that at $329, getting the Axial scale experience with the SCX102 chassis has never been more affordable then it is with the Trail Honcho. He discusses the updates in the axle and link design, along with a the budget friendly Tactic radio. Stiff plastic links, single piece axle housings with a reinforced truss section and the use of the AX10 transmission case offer a solid base, along with all the electronics that we’ve seen proven in the other SCX102 platforms, as the Trail Honcho shares a lot of parts with the other versions, the Cherokees and the CRC JK. His overall opinion? The “Trail Honcho one of the most attractive ready-to-run RC trail trucks.”

Extreme Scale Performance RC

Axial AX90059 SCX10II Trail Honcho UNBOXED! If you like some raw unboxing with some suspension squishing, suspension flexing, tire squishing and even watching someone taking a hit of fresh tire smell, then Extreme Scale Performance has the video for you. CWC goes over all the details from the box to the rig from his side arm cam view. He gives you his deep thoughts and opinions on some of the new parts found on the Trail Honcho SCX10 II platform like the links, axles and transmission set-up. No drive time here, but plenty of detailed honest info.

RC Driver Online

The Honcho Returns! Better & Budget Friendly – Axial SCX10 II Trail Honcho Review This video is a long one folks, RC Driver Online unloads a thorough unboxing video giving you all the details you could possibly want and more about the Honcho. You want to know specifically what it comes with all the way to what changes were made in this specific SCX10 II RTR, it’s here. Then RC Driver goes on to talk about the differences in the Honcho kit in comparison to the two other SCX10 II ready to runs available at this time; the SCX10 II 2000 Jeep Cherokee and the SCX10 II 2017 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited CRC. After that tour, the Trail honcho is taken out for a frigid drive under some bridges in a snow covered park. Then the video is wrapped up with thoughts of the rigs performance. If you want to know everything about the Trail Honcho in one shot, sit back, relax, learn a whole lot and enjoy the drive with RC Driver.