How To: Low Cost Blazer Tail Lights

Simple_Blazer_Tail_Light_Install
The AX90058 SCX10 II 1969 Chevrolet Blazer has become an instant hit since it’s release and drivers all over are already taking it out to explore new trails and others are already customizing it with incredible scale detail. A few of the features that many Blazer owners like is the included front LED lights and included AE-5L speed control to power the lights. If you haven’t noticed already, there is an open pigtail on the speed control that will allow you to install an additional set of LED lights. We’re going to show you how to take advantage of that open LED port by installing tail lights on your Blazer. All you’ll need are the light pods included with the kit, some hardware you may already have and a light string you can pick up at your local hobby shop or favorite online retailer.

Axial Blazer Tail Lights 1
You remember that bag of extras that came with your kit? Time to dig it out from under your workbench. Inside you’ll find some parts trees with light buckets and lenses. There are a number of light buckets included, but we’re going to use the small round buckets found on the tree shown above.

Axial Blazer Tail Lights 3
To add LED lights you’ll need to pick up a pack of AX31481 lights that will look similar to the lights above. You’ll also need just a few screws to complete the install. Two 3x6mm button head machine screws (AXA0113) and two 2x6mm cap head machine screws (AXA013.)

STEP 1
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 4 Axial Blazer Tail Lights 5
We’re going to install the tail lights in the rear bumper. The first step is to test fit the lights so you know exactly where they are going. The two photos above show where the light buckets will be located on our Blazer.

STEP 2
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 6
Using a marker, make a mark on the bumper where the indexing pin on the light bucket will go in the bumper.

STEP 3
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 7
Now drill a small hole where you made your reference mark. We actually found that rotating a hobby knife around like a drill will make a nice small hole just right for the bucket pin.

STEP 4
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 8
Now place the light bucket back into place on the bumper, the index pin should go right into the bumper. Make sure the bucket is square in the bumper and then use your marker to make a mark around the mounting boss of the bucket. This will give you an idea of where you need to drill the mounting hole.

STEP 5
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 9
Drill a 3.5mm hole using your marks as a guide. When you’re done, your hole pattern should look like this.

STEP 6
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 11
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 10
Time to assemble your light buckets. Slide the LED light in the bucket, followed by the LED clip over the back of the light and use the 2x6mm screw to secure the clip to the bucket.

STEP 7
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 12
Next press the lenses into the light buckets. TIP 1: Paint the lens red from the backside to give it more of a tail light look. TIP 2: Before pressing the lens into the bucket, use some clear model glue to help secure the lens.

STEP 8
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 13
Here is the tricky part, screwing the light bucket to the bumper using the 3x6mm screw. To do this, we cheated and made an additional hole in the bumper bracket that allowed us to slip a long 2mm ball-end hex driver through the bumper to get to the screw. Screw your light pods to the bumper.

STEP 9
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 14
Things get simpler here. Plug your LED light string into the open port of the AE-5L speed control.

STEP 10
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 15
Use some zip-ties to secure the LED light wires to the chassis cross members.

FINISHED
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 17 Axial Blazer Tail Lights 16
In about 10-15 minutes of time at your workbench, you should have working taillights. Head out to the trails and enjoy the new look of your Blazer on your Axial Adventures.
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 18

Axial SCX10 II 1969 Chevrolet Blazer Video Collection

It’s that time again where we gather up some of the most viewed videos of Axial’s newest release. This time it’s the AX90058 SCX10 II 1969 Chevrolet Blazer. The following (in no particular order) represents some of the most viewed videos on the Blazer at the time of posting. Some are action videos, some unboxing and some include reviews of the truck. If you have or are interested in the AX90058 SCX10 II 1969 Chevrolet Blazer, then this is your go to spot to get information and impression of this exciting scale off-road ready to run rig.


By: axialvideos
Title: Axial AX90058 SCX10 II 1969 Chevrolet Blazer 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – RTR
Description: Classic looks. Open-air top. Aggressive stance. These are just some of the characteristics that describe the gorgeous Axial AX90058 SCX10 II 1969 Chevrolet Blazer, a rig that’s as comfortable climbing to the top of a mountain as it is cruising on the beach.

But this Blazer sports more than just a macho look. Additional items like chrome-coated grille, mirrors and door handles are included. Officially licensed Chassis Unlimited front and rear tube bumpers are mounted tight to the body for maximum clearance and a set of off-road light (with LEDs) shine some light when the action goes dark.

To keep the Axial Racing SCX10 II 1969 Chevrolet Blazer rolling along in even the toughest situations, we’ve mounted it on our rugged SCX10™ II chassis. High-clearance AR44 high-pinion axles, a chassis mounted servo (CMS), re-designed AX10™ transmission case and tough steel suspension links are just a few of the parts that make the Blazer 4WD, ready to run, RC scale truck a beast on any terrain.


By: Harley Designs
Title: Axial K5 Blazer SCX10-2 Review
Description: The Axial 1969 Chevrolet K5 Blazer is hitting the shelves and I’m excited to get my hands on one early. This truck is bigger than the normal SCX10-2 that we have seen lately, its much closer to the size of first SCX10-2 Cherokee body and also includes the hard molded grill, but this time in chrome! Check it out as we go deep into the details and differences of this truck vs any of the other available models!


By:Scale Builder’s Guild
Title: Axial 1969 Blazer Unbox and Q&A!
Description: (Video Recorded From Live Broadcast) I take a live look at the new Blazer bodied RTR offering from Axial, and answer your questions.


By: RCDriver_Online
Title: Tackle The Toughest Trails! – Axial Racing AX90058 SCX10 II Chevrolet Blazer Review
Description: For some time now, there has been a rumor of a Chevrolet Blazer body in the works from the crew at Axial Racing. People have been eagerly awaiting to hear if the rumor is true. Well the time has come and it’s true, Axial has released their new Blazer body on their SCX10 II and this factory painted blue machine has lots of scale enthusiasts pumped for new builds. We managed to grab one of these new machines and give it our standard unboxing, feature breakdown, action segment and performance breakdown. Have you been waiting for a exciting new Axial scale RC trail truck? This just might be the rig you’ve been waiting for.


By: ferndogg310
Title: BLUE JUSTICE!! 69 CHEVROLET BLAZER SCX10-2- Ferndogg310
Description: Before I head out to Axialfest 2018, I had the opportunity to test drive the 1969 Chevrolet Blazer by Axial Racing before its release. This may be my current favorite [SCX10-2] RTR from AXIAL. [#AX90058]


By: axialvideos
Title: Axial SCX10 II 1969 Chevrolet Blazer Through The Woods & Water Crawl
Description: The Axial AX90058 SCX10 II 1969 Chevrolet Blazer has recently been announced and we showed you a rig that’s as comfortable climbing to the top of a mountain as it is cruising on the beach in its product launch video. Now we show you how it looks taking on another tough side of nature navigating through wooded trails and trudging through creeks.

The Axial AX90058 SCX10 II 1969 Chevrolet Blazer comes ready to run with chrome-coated grille, mirrors and door handles are included. Officially licensed Chassis Unlimited front and rear tube bumpers are mounted tight to the body for maximum clearance and a set of off-road light (with LEDs) shine some light when the action goes dark. To keep the Axial Racing SCX10 II 1969 Chevrolet Blazer rolling along in even the toughest situations, it’s mounted it on the rugged SCX10™ II chassis. High-clearance AR44 high-pinion axles, a chassis mounted servo (CMS), re-designed AX10™ transmission case and tough steel suspension links are just a few of the parts that make the Blazer 4WD, ready to run, RC scale truck a beast on any terrain.

Simple Honcho Interior Install

Simple_Honcho_Interior_Install
The Trail Honcho has been a long time favorite for RC off-road enthusiasts. It has an all business look with the large plate shielded front bumper, its recognizable cab and it’s tough cage rear section. When the SCX10 II Trail Honcho was announced, drivers enthusiasm again surged for this iconic machine in the scale crawling world. But this writer still felt it needed a little something else. You see, inside of that cool extended cab is, well, empty. You look into the windows and you see wires, a motor and a transmission case. Now the new transmission case does have a cool new scale look to it, however, it’s not something you’d expect to see if you looked into a cab of a scale truck. There should be an interior right? Agreed! So I started sifting through possible options for an interior. Drivers who run the SCX10 II 2017 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited CRC use the 2012 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon Body as an interior. But there isn’t anything that is a true close fit such as that example. First I took a Deadbolt Body and held it up to the Honcho. This seemed like an ok option and then out of the corner of my eye was a 1/10 Yeti RTR interior. This interior seemed to fill the space in the Honcho cab a bit better. Interior found! In this Tech how to, we’ll show you just how easy it is to adapt the Yeti interior into the Trail Honcho for a better scale appearance.
Axial Honcho Interior 1

PARTS NEEDED
Y-380 1/10th Scale Interior – AX31141
Helmet Set (Black) – AX31049
Misc. Hardware
2-sided Tape

Axial Honcho Interior 2
TOOLS NEEDED
Reamer or Drill with bits
Permanent Marker
Polycarbonate Paint

PREPARATION
In this how to, we’re using an Interior from a 1/10 Yeti Ready To Run which comes painted. If you’ve purchased the Yeti interior as a stand alone part, you’ll need to paint it yourself. Take the time to wash the lexan with soap and water before painting it. Paint in a well ventilated area and take your time and paint the body and or helmets to meet your custom scale needs.

STEP 1
Axial Honcho Interior 3
We want to secure the interior to the Honcho with screws so we need to decide where those screws should be located. To hide the screws as best as possible, we’re going to locate the mounting points in the hood vent area. Using the marker, place a dot where you will drill the holes.

STEP 2
Axial Honcho Interior 4
Using your reamer or a drill bit, drill a hole on each side of the body in the vent decal area where your mounting points will be. The holes should be slightly larger in diameter to the hardware you’ve selected to use.

STEP 3
Axial Honcho Interior 6
To help position the interior we’ve placed two small pieces of two sided tape on each side of the body to secure the interior. This will allow us to move and tweak its position before we use screws to mount it permanently.

STEP 4
Axial Honcho Interior 5
Once the interior is in position, press it down firmly to secure it to the two-sided tape on the body.

STEP 5
Axial Honcho Interior 7
Now that the interior is in place, you can use your reamer or drill bit to open a hole in the interior, using the hole you previously made in the hood as a guide.

STEP 6
Axial Honcho Interior 8
With holes in the body and interior, you can secure the two together using the hardware of your choice. We found some small 1.6mm screws and nuts in our spares bin. Using smaller hardware looks a bit more scale.

STEP 7
Axial Honcho Interior 11
We’re not going to go through all the motions again to tell you how to make a hole, so we’ll give you the basic rundown on how to secure the rear. We chose to drill a hole through the “Keyhole” on the Honcho’s door handles as the spot to locate the hardware that will secure the interior in the rear. We then ran a long drill bit into the interior and drilled a pilot hole. With some long screws we found in our hardware bin and some plastic nuts and shoulder spacers we found in our Axial spares bag, we secured the back half of the interior on each side.
Axial Honcho Interior 9

FINISHED
A few Axial option parts, a little paint and just a few minutes with some basic hobby tools and hardware you probably have lying around, you now have an interior for your Honcho that fills the cab space and hides all of the inner workings of the SCX10.
Axial Honcho Interior 10

Axial SCX10 II Deadbolt YouTube Video Collection

SCX10II_Deadbolt_Video_Collection

With all of the different social media platforms out there, didn’t you ever just wish you could find all of the cool videos of a certain RC rig all in one spot? Yeah, us too. So we took the liberty of doing the hard works and scoured social media to find some great videos of the Axial SCX10 Deadbolt. There were certainly a lot of great videos out there, but these stood out. In this Deadbolt Video Collection you’ll find everything from videos that give you all the details you’ll need to know about the truck, to exciting action segments and even tips to help you tune the scale trail machine.


By: Axial Racing
Title: Axial AX90066 SCX10™ II Deadbolt RTR
Video Description: Time to rule the rocks with some attitude! We’ve combined the rugged good looks of the Deadbolt™ with the exceptional handling of the trail-ready SCX10™ II chassis, giving you a rig that’s got both charisma and competence. The Deadbolt™ body is now coated with an olive drab paint scheme while keeping the original features you’ve come to love about it; narrow stance, bulging hood, realistic driver figure and exterior cage complete with light bar (LED lights sold separately). Finalizing the look is a licensed CRC front bumper and Method Hole wheels wrapped in Nitto Trail Grappler tires.


By: Scale Builder Guild
Title: Axial Deadbolt 2 – Start your Adventure HERE!
Video Description: Today I talk about the latest SCX10 II release from Axial, the Deadbolt 2. It’s an excellent place to start your journey into scale accurate builds, for the lowest price of entry. I think there’s a lot of potential here, so much so that this will be the next project build going forward!


By: Harley Designs
Title: Axial Deadbolt 2 – Free Modifications
Video Description: The Axial SCX10-II Deadbolt is the most budget friendly option they offer, so lets cover some free mods to get your rig handling even better on the cheap!


By: RCDriver_Online
Title: RC Trail Truck Favorite Gets A 2018 Overhaul! – Axial SCX10 II Deadbolt Running & Review
Video Description: The Axial Racing SCX10 Deadbolt has been a favorite trail truck for many RC off-road enthusiasts. This truck typically is the most affordable of the Axial offerings and is backed up with a cool look and great performance. Many chose the Gen 1 SCX10 Deadbolt for fun trail runs or the base machine for their wild trail truck builds. Well, it’s sad to hear the Gen 1 Deadbolt has been discontinued, but luckily it’s getting replaced here in 2018 with the SCX10 II Deadbolt! The new Deadbolt gets the new high performance SCX10 II platform with the same Deadbolt body we all fell in love with with a few slight style chanced like the color. This new Gen Deadbolt still has the affordable price tag too, so we can see it carrying on as a favorite for those getting into the RC trail truck world and those looking for a platform to start their next adventure build. In this video, we take a quick look back at the Gen 1 Deadbolt, followed by a feature breakdown of the new Deadbolt, then take it for a run and wrap up the video with a performance report.


By: SNOWMOD RC
Title: SNOWMOD RC – AXIAL DEADBOLT 2(FIRST RUN)
Video Description: SNOWMOD RC takes out the newest addition to the lineup from Axial Racing, the AX90066 Deadbolt 2! What a great rig with lots of new updates.

 

Axial Deadbolt and Wrangler CRC Bumper Mod

CRC_Bumper_Mod

As you continue to grow into your Axial SCX10 II and become more comfortable driving the rig, you’ll want to progress your adventures beyond daily driving. When doing this, you’ll start to think more about approach angles to obstacles and this is when things like the scale replica bumper on the truck may hold you back. Sure the bumper looks cool, but it’s overhang may prevent you from getting over some tough terrain. When you reach this point, you might want to consider modifying your bumper. Here we’re going to go over a CRC bumper modification that many seasoned scale drivers are already doing. You’ll need a few basic tools you may already have on hand and just a little bit of time at your workbench. Let’s get started.

TOOLS NEEDED
2.0mm Hex Driver
Lexan Scissors
Drill & 2.5mm drill bit
Dremel tool with sanding drum

BEFORE WE BEGIN
Axial CRC Bumper Mod 2
Before you jump right into your bumper modification, let’s take a look at the stock bumpers position, just so you can see how much it has moved once the mod is complete.

STEP 1
Axial CRC Bumper Mod 3
Using a 2mm hex driver, remove the two screw pins that hold the bumper to its mount.

STEP 2
Axial CRC Bumper Mod 4
Using a marker, mark the area that will need to be cut away from the original bumper in order to move it farther back in the chassis. Note, you’ll want to clear the chassis rails, so make sure you start your marks on the outside of the frame rails.

STEP 3
Axial CRC Bumper Mod 5
Using a pair of Lexan scissors, cut along the line you marked on the bumper. Be aware that there are thin support tabs in the bumper that will need to be cut as well.

STEP 4
Axial CRC Bumper Mod 6
Toss scrap plastic and if you wish, clean up the cut edges on the bumper with a Dremel tool and sanding drum. Be sure to wear eye protection.

STEP 5
Axial CRC Bumper Mod 7
The thin support plastic tabs you cut through before are also located on the top side of the bumper posts. These will need to be cut away too, to allow the bumper to slide further into the mount. Using straight scissors, cut the tab close to the post and close to the bumper plate.

STEP 6
Axial CRC Bumper Mod 8
Now you can “rip” the rest of the little support tabs out with a pair of needle nose pliers.

CHECK YOUR WORK
Axial CRC Bumper Mod 9
With the bumper cut up and the tabs removed, insert the bumper to make sure your cuts were enough. We have plenty of room here to cut the ends of the mounting posts and move the bumper even farther back.

STEP 8
Axial CRC Bumper Mod 10
With a pair of side-cutters, cut the ends of the bumper posts off at the last hole.

STEP 9
Axial CRC Bumper Mod 11
We’re getting close to finishing. Insert the bumper as far back as it will go in the mount, making sure it’s square to the chassis. Take your drill with 2.5mm bit and drill new holes into the bumper posts using the holes in the chassis mount as a guide.

STEP 10
Axial CRC Bumper Mod 12
Grab the bumper mounting screw pins and screw your bumper back in place in the new set back location.

DONE
Axial CRC Bumper Mod 13
The bumper relocation is complete. See how much closer it is to the battery mount? You’ve now reduced the amount of front bumper overhang and should be able to approach steeper obstacles to conquer.
Axial CRC Bumper Mod 14

Tech: Soften Your SCX10 II Suspension – For Free!

SoftenSCX10II_Suspension

Recently we walked you through an inexpensive way to lower the CG on your SCX10 II in our SCX10 II Handling Adjustment blog. With some hardware and a little time, the rigs handling was improved for those looking to get more performance out of their trucks. Now we have another suggestion to improve handling even more and this modification is completely free, as long as you don’t charge for your shop time. This modification is to soften the suspension on the SCX10 II and it’s done by just moving parts around that are already on the truck. The rear suspension has softer springs that will be moved to the front and medium rate springs to the rear. The shock positions will then be moved in the rear to give them a softer feel. It’s pretty simple, only requires a few tools and just a little bit of time.

TOOLS NEEDED
Kit Box Wrench
2mm Hex Driver

STEP 1
Axial Suspension 2
Like many steps in customizing your rig, step one here is to remove the wheels. First unscrew the “Locker” caps, followed by the 7mm wheel nuts using your box wrench.

STEP 2
Axial Suspension 3
Let’s start at the front and remove the lower shock mounting screw from the AR44 axle  with the 2mm hex driver. With the shock dangling, slip the spring perch off the bottom of the shock and remove the soft springs.

STEP 3
Axial Suspension 4
Now move to the rear of the machine and using your 2mm hex driver, remove the upper and lower shock mounting screws.

STEP 4
Axial Suspension 5
Here are the front medium rate springs next to the rear shocks. You can just see the difference in the springs thickness. You’ll want to remove the lower perches from the shocks and swap the springs.

Axial Suspension 6
The softer springs are now set on the rear shocks and ready for installation.

STEP 5
Axial Suspension 7
So the rear springs don’t roll off your workbench, now would be a great time to reinstall them back on the front shocks, slip the perches on and screw the lower shock mount back onto the AR44 axle.

STEP 6
Axial Suspension 9
Back to the rear of the rig. Start by removing the shock hoops front the frame. We’re going to take them off the one side and reinstall them on the opposite side in a bit.

STEP 7
Axial Suspension 10
Before reinstalling the shock hoops, the center cross brace needs to be moved. Take it from its stock location and push it forward to the forwardmost holes. This is where the new hoop locations will be.

Axial Suspension 11
The cross brace in the new location.

STEP 8
Axial Suspension 12
The shock hoops can be installed now. Remember, you have to swap the hoops from side to side.

Axial Suspension 13
Once the hoops are in the new position, you won’t even have to relocate the body mounts, they will be in the right factory location. Bonus!

STEP 9
Axial Suspension 14
Time to bolt the shocks back in place. Screw the top of the shock into the forwardmost hole.

STEP 10
Axial Suspension 15
Mount the lower shock mount to the AR44 axles. The shock will now be on a “lay down” angle. The angle of the shock gives the shocks a softer feel while it’s compressing, thus making it feel like it has a softer spring.

SEE THE DIFFERENCE
That modification was pretty simple and probably took you under ten minutes to complete. Now the trucks suspension will have a softer feel and allow it to compress as it goes over rocks and obstacles easier. Take a look at the difference below.

Axial Suspension 1
Before | Stock shock set-up

Axial Suspension 16
After | Springs swapped and rear shock angle change

SCX10 II Handling Adjustment – $3 Shock Mod

SCX10II_HandlingAdjustment

We’re guessing by now you’ve logged a lot of miles on your SCX10 II ready to run rig. The truck has probably served you well tackling new terrain wherever your adventure takes you. So what’s next? How about improving your rig for better handling on those to tough to conquer trails. The stock out of the box SCX10 II is set up for general scale trail use, but the highly capable platform can improve as you improve and the tuning trick we’re about to show you will cost you just a few bucks and will take less than ten minutes of your time to complete. What we’re going to do here is lower the CG of the SCX10 II by simply relocating the lower shock mounting point. The shock end comes mounted to the axle on its own mounting boss. But, by relocating it to the same mounting point as the lower link, it lowers the overall Center Of Gravity of the chassis and a lower COG equals better handling. Let’s get started!

WHAT YOU NEED
axa120
3x25mm Button Head Machine Screw- AXA120
3mm Thin Nylon-Lock Nut- AXA1052 (Optional)
Basic hobby tools- 2.0mm hex driver, wheel nut wrench and long nose pleirs

Step 1
SCX Shock Mod 1
Let’s get the easy stuff out of the way. Remove the wheel nut caps, wheel nuts, wheels and lower shock mount screws from all four corners of your SCX10 II.

Step 2
SCX Shock Mod 2
Now, remove the screw that secures the link to the axle and place it in your spare hardware bin.

Step 3
SCX Shock Mod 3
Take the new long 3x25mm button head screw that you spent a whole $3 on and insert it through the shock end, into the axle mount with the link in place and screw it all the way in.

Step 4 (Option)
SCX Shock Mod 4
The screw will be secure as it has been screwed into the plastic axle mounting boss. But if you want to go one step further in security to make sure that screw doesn’t back out, you can add a thing 3mm Ny-Lock nut to the end of the screw. Tighten the nut snug.

Step 5
Repeat Step 2-4 for the remaining shock/ link points.

Step 6
Reinstall your wheels, nuts and caps.

SEE THE DIFFERENCE
SCX Shock Mod 6
You can see above, the left shock is in the stock location and the right shock has been relocated to the new position in-line with the lower link. The axle is also visibly lowered on the right side in the photo. Once all four shocks have been relocated and the truck turned upright, the chassis will now be lower in comparison to the stock position.

BACK TO THE TRAIL
Now you’re ready to head back out and try and navigate some of those tough terrain features that may have defeated you prior. With the lower CG, your rig will benefit from the modification. Keep in mind, this will not be a night and day difference. You still need to choose your lines and wheel speed wisely. Make sure you keep checking back to the Axial blogs as we’ll continue to offer tuning secrets to help your SCX10 II improve as you improve. #AxialPerformance

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod
The Axial AX90066 Deadbolt is an extremely popular body style, and we’re constantly pulling spare plastic out of our parts bins to try and create a few simple body mods.

The first is something we’ve been asked about for a long time – why doesn’t the Deadbolt come with a rear bumper. Well, say no more – check out this great little how to on adding a simple rear bumper to the back of your Deadbolt.

TOOLS NEEDED:
1. 1.5mm Hex Wrench
2. 2.0mm Hex Wrench
3. Side cutters
4. Dremel (to help clean up the bumper)

LIST OF PARTS USED:
AX80125 Axial SCX10 Poison Spyder JK Brawler Lite Front Bumper

Step 1

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod
Here are the two parts we’ll be installing; a front bumper and bumper mount. We’ll use the original hardware included with your Deadbolt to re-mount the parts.

Step 2

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod
Using the side cutters, clip the hoop off the bumper. Here’s where you can use the Dremel to clean up the bumper. If you have a thin pair of side cutters, you might be able to clip close to the bumper and not require any Dremel work.

Step 3

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod
Remove the stock rear bumper and install the AX80125 mount. Use the stock hardware to lock it in place.

Step 4

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod
Slide your freshly modified rear bumper into the mount and secure with the stock hardware.

Step 5

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod
Set your body on top and examine your handiwork. Your Deadbolt now has a rear bumper that even includes light buckets!

Step 6

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod
But wait – there’s more! If you have a set of D-rings lying around, you can add those to the rear bumper to help pull your buddies out if they get stuck!


This second mod came about after a couple of us found that getting to the rear body clips can be a bit of a pain if you have chunky hands. This mod will not only make it super easy to get to them, it also give provisions for adding a scale rear tire.

TOOLS NEEDED:
1. 2.0mm Hex Wrench
2. Side cutters
3. Dremel (to help clean up the bumper)

LIST OF PARTS USED:
AXA0147 M3x16mm Hex Socket Flat Head Screw
AXA1052 M3 Thin Nylon Locking Hex Nut
AXA0422 M2.6x6mm Hex Socket Tapping Button Screw
AX31305 TT-380 Rear Lower Cage and Tire Retainer
AX80130 Roll Cage Sides

Step 1

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod
Remove the body – as you can see, it’s a little tough getting to the rear body pins with sausage fingers.

Step 2

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod
Here are the parts you’ll need. Any spare tire will work with this mod (as long as it’s a 1.9). It’s also suggested that you remove the foam insert as well. You’ll see more about this later.

Step 3

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod
Mount the tire to the cage by inserting your 16mm screw through the washer, then through the tire. Note the orientation of the mount; this setup mounts the tire low in the bed for the best performance. If you want to allow a little more room for, say, some scale items, flip the plastic mount as shown in the picture below (you’ll need at least a 30mm screw to attach the rear tire).

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod

Step 4

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod
Secure the tire in place with a M3 locknut. If you’re feeling really sassy, you can use the AX31320 Axial Bomber Rear Tire Hold Down for a super trick look!

Step 5

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod
Remove the screws from the stock cage (see the pretty red arrows). Make sure you remove them from BOTH sides of the Deadbolt.

Step 6

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod
Using the side cutters, chop off the rear part of the cage as shown. You can use a Dremel here to clean up the cut or just leave it be.

Step 7

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod
Attach your rear tire mount to the cage, flip it up and secure with the M2.6×6 screws. Tightening these down will help keep the rear cage in place, just be sure not to over-tighten them.

Step 8

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod
Lower the cage all the way to the body, and ‘pinch’ the tire in-between the cage. This is where a tire without the foam insert will help hold the flip-cage in place a little better.

Step 9

Axial Deadbolt AX90066 Simple Body and Bumper Mod
Now, swing the cage up to install the body pins. Brilliant, right?

Skeeno’s Axialfest 2018 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Build

After AXIALFEST2017, I started thinking that I needed to update my trailing rig.  Last year, I built a new racer for for the Altra Ultra 5K Enduro, but I needed something new to run on all the trials at AXIALFEST2018.

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As luck would have it, Brown Santa dropped off some Green Tape just before the Christmas season.  Merry Christmas to me!

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When I opened up the box, it was packed with the new SCX10 2 2017 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited CRC.  This would be a great new trailing rig for AXIALFEST2018!

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My buddy, Mr. Werty over at WertyMade contacted me as soon as he found out I had the new rig.  He wanted to use it as a test mule for some parts he was making; rear bumpers, front bumpers, and rock sliders. Since we’ve been RC nerd friends for many years, I happily agreed to lend him my new trailing rig.

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He returned it to me in even better than tip top shape.  All the parts he test fitted, he left on there for me, score!  I immediately started thinking about the things I wanted to modify and add to improve the performance and looks of the 2017 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited CRC. First up was to get a spare tire and some RotopaX on the rear bumper.

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Mr. Werty repossessed those D Rings, so that was one item I wanted to replace on that sweet front stinger.

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Check out those sweet sliders, indexed to hold the body, just like the stock plastic ones, but these are made out of steel.  The wrench logo in a nice touch, too.

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Next up was a new set of socks and shoes.  I’ve always liked beadlocks and the classic Axial 1.9 Beadlocks were my first choice.  Just as I got the wheels, Werty annouced these new Wrench Rings, and I just had to have a set.

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Look how awesome the rings look.

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In order to add a little crawling performance, I like to add some weight in the wheels to lower the center of gravity.  The Axial Internal Rings are a perfect fit. I also swapped out to a slightly beefier looking tire, the BFG All-Terrains are a classic tire and the KO2 version is even better than the original.

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They mount up easily, and you can adjust the weight using the inserts.

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At this point, I was loving this wheel/tire/ring combo, but I wasn’t digging looking at the electronics through the wheel wells.

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It was starting to look pretty good, but I still had a ways to go.

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Next up, I needed to add some swag to the rear.

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Since I wasn’t using the stock Nitto Trail Grabbers, I pressed one into service as the spare tire.

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Next, I hit up my local hobby shop, CKRC Hobbies and picked up these RotopaX gas cans from Scale by Chris AKA SBC.

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Don’t worry, the tire rack swings away, so you can still get into the back of the Jeep.

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Another modification I like to do is the 3654 Mod to the wheel hexes.  Eazy Elio from Two Chainz Scalerz taught me this trick to give any Axial scaler a slighly wider stance. Since the stock hexes are about 3mm, this modification adds about 10mm of width to the SCX10 2.

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While I was at CKRC picking up the SBC RotopaX cans, I spotted these brass 8mm hexes from Team KNK. It might be slight, but the brass hexes will also lower the center of gravity slighty.

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They fit perfectly and come with new wheel nuts and set screws to secure them to the axles.

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Next up was adding some wheel wells to hide the electronics.  I used the wheel wells for the original SCX10.

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They aren’t a perfect fit, but with a little creativity with the scissors, they worked out pretty well.

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The curve of the Jeep Wrangler body means you have to trim the fronts quite a bit.

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I ended up trimming that front tab off because I was worried it would hang up on twigs and things on the trail.

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After a little black paint, they look great.

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Black helps hide all the imperfections.

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That’s WAY better than before; no more unsightly wires can be seen under there.

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I almost forgot to mention this cool feature on the WertyMade bumper. Those four holes are for mounting a rear winch if you want one…

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And that hole is a bottle opener for those times when you need to hydrate during wrenching sessions!

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Next, it was time to add a some interior to give it a little more scale look, as well as to hide the electronics a little more.  I heard from the Anthony Rivas of Rivas Concepts and Matt Kett from the Scale Builders Guild that the 2012 Jeep Wrangler body was a perfect fit.

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Sadly, I had to kill a perfectly good body.  If you want to try this, you can probably find an old body from one of your local RC buddies to cut up.

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Be sure to cut around the lights and fender flares.

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The rear view mirror mounting holes make a great mounting point.  The two screws hold the front securely.

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I found that the door handle impressions lined up perfectly and made getting it in evenly easy.

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I cut a big hole to allow for the rear body mounts to pass through.

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Don’t worry, with the tinted rear windows, you can only see it if you are staring directly into the rear windows.

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Looking good so far. Time for paint.

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I wavered between black, red, and silver before settling on the silver.  I was happy with my choice because the bright color makes the interior pop against the red.

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That’s what I’m talking about.  No more unsightly electrics can be seen in there.

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Earlier, I got distracted by that big open space in the front bumper. TIme to remedy that.

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I pulled the winch off my old SCX10 and it mounted up easily.  It even had a matching red hook.

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Oh yeah! that looks way better with the winch in there.

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I found some D rings on some old parts trees to replace the ones Mr. Werty repossessed. I even put one on the rear bumper.

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Back to the interior.  Sticker time!

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I kept it pretty simple in here.  The only thing I added was the steering wheel I had in my parts box.  Low Rider Style with the chain ring.

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Boom!

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Bam! The silver and black really contrasts well against the red.

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There it is mounted up, two screws through the mirror holes and a little tape hold it in.

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There’s the mirror screws holding the mirrors on and the interior in.

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I also found some wipers on the spare parts tree and mounted them up.

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I really like the clean looks of it.

51 She’s just about ready to conquer all the trails at AXIALFEST2018!

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I just wanted to add a couple more scale details.  First I added the molded door handles.

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A bonus of the door handles is they also hold the interior in place.

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Then, I added the molded hood latches.  Both of these come on the spare parts trees in the box.

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I had to give it a quick trail run to test it out.

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I must say, this rig handles amazingly well.

58I’m thinking this rig is going to be amazing at AXIALFEST2018!

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One last item before I wrap up this build.  I need a few more lumens than the stock headlights, so I decided to add the JRC Offroad Roof Rack.

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Looks pretty good up there even though it’s originally meant for the 2000 Jeep Cherokee.

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The Rigid Light Bar fits perfectly up there.

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I used the 8 String LED and 3 Port High Output LED Controller.

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I’m really loving the look and capabilities of this rig.

 

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I’m definitely ready to emark on the adventures that Axialfest 2018 holds. I just wish July 18th would get here already!

 

Axialfest Trail Rig Prep

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Before you know it, Axialfest will be upon us and the last thing you want to worry about is preparing just a few days before you embark on your adventure. You want to have your adventure vehicle ready to go and ready to take on the terrain without failure ahead of time. Yes, Axial vehicles are built tough, but taking the time to have your rig ready will ensure more fun on the trail. We’ve gathered up a number of tips to help get your rig ready from what hardware to use, to driveline tips and things you may need along the way.

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Hardware Check

Set-Screws- Set-screws can be a headache in the RC world, they are used in several areas on just about any rig. The most common is the pinion gear. If the set-screw goes into metal, it’s a good idea to add some blue thread locking compound to it before installing it. The thread locking compound is a measure to ensure the screw doesn’t back out during use.

Lock-nut- Early SCX10’s used standard nuts in several locations and perhaps you’ve installed a nut or two along the way while working on or customizing your truck. Consider swapping out all standard nuts with ny-lock nuts. These nuts have a plastic insert ring that helps prevent the nut from backing off of the screw.

Machine Screws- Machine screws have a much finer thread than a self-tapping screw. This finer thread often offers more “bite” into a part for extra security. Consider using machines screws wherever you can. And like that pesky set-screw, always use blue thread-locking compound on machine screws that go into metal so they don’t vibrate out while in use.

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Driveline Tips

Screw Pins- Screw pins are often used to secure the universal yokes to the axle drive pinions, if your rig doesn’t have them and you have a through-hole in the bevel pinion shaft, go with a screw-pin instead of a set-screw. This will ensure drive instead of a set-screw that can back out and slip. Use thread-lock here too of course.

Universals- We’ve seen some torn-up universals in our day. These components take a lot of abuse. Replacing the cross-pins before your many Axialfest adventures can be a good idea. At the very least, check your universals for binding or regrease them if they look dry.

Bearings- Do you want to be “The Squeaky Guy?” Bearings take a lot of abuse and as they get covered in dirt or submerged in water, you risk the chance of bearing failure. If you hear squeaking, consider cleaning your bearings, blast them with a cleaner and re-oil them. Some go so far as to repack the bearing with grease. A bad bearing can eventually wreak havoc on your driveline on the trail. Fix it before it causes other possibly more expensive problems.

Gears- This is an important topic here. Many of crunchy transmissions have been heard along the trails at Axialfest. During your pretrip check, take a look at all of the gears. Do any look sharp, missing parts of their teeth, is your gearcase full of metal dust? Don’t leave it to a trail run to find our you needed to replace gears. In the axles, make sure the gear lash is correct between the bevel pinion and ring gear. Shims may be used to adjust gear lash. Inside of the center transmission, make sure your gears are well lubricated with grease. If you do have plastic internal gears, on your SCX10, consider upgrading to the metal gears, here is the link for the upgrade: HERE And finally, your pinion and spur. Make sure your mesh is correct, not too loose that your gears can skip and not too tight that it binds.

Slipper- Your slipper clutch is often the line of defense to protecting your transmission. When your rig gets caught up in a gap in the rocks and you pin the throttle, the slipper will slip rather than the gears skipping. You want the slipper tight enough so you get through gnarly obstacles, but you do need that slip for protection. A little trial and error works here in terms of setting. Always lean toward the loose side to start with.

Grease- As mentioned above a number of times. Grease, grease grease. Grease the gears, consider greasing the bearings, add grease to metal shafts inside of the axles, grease universal joints. Grease will keep these parts smooth and offer some protection from the elements.

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Waterproof Everything

Specific Electronics- Axialfest is known to have some water encounters and as you know water and electronics don’t mix. Most ready to run electronics are waterproof or water resistant but if you’re running something from an older build date or have swapped out your electronics for something non-WP, you might consider taking some precautions to waterproofing your equipment. Seal the servo case with silicone, put a bead of grease around servo output shafts. ESC’s are a bit more difficult to waterproof using silicone as the heatsink area is an area where water can get in. Brushed motors can get wet, just prep by oiling the bearings or bushings.

Radio Box Sealing- The radio box is often the home for items that can be damaged by water or debris. The receiver, lighting module or winch controller are often placed in radio boxes. But water can still get inside unless you seal it up. Use a bead of silicone or grease to seal off any gaps that will allow water to enter the box.

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Light It Up

Why You Need Them- Some of the best adventures on the rocks at Cisco Grove happen at night. The night driving element is very challenging and you’ll see drivers out on the rocks until all hours of the morning. You’ll want to consider adding as much lighting to you and your rig as possible.

Options- Headlight and taillight kits are obvious and selecting the right one really depends on the type of body you run. The other option are light bars. Light bars are a pretty simple bolt on light system to install and many plug right into the receiver for power. Another option to consider are well lights. Those are lights in the wheel wells so you can see exactly what type of terrain your rig is going over. There are plenty of lights to choose from in the Axial options list. You can find more on lights: HERE  Then there are the lights for you. A head-lamp is a great source of light to blaze through the trails. Some fashion flashlights to their radios with tape or rubber bands. Get creative with your lights, but whatever you choose, make sure it’s enough to light the way for long periods of time.

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What To Carry

Parts Supplies- Beyond prepping your rig for the trails, you should prep for those what if moments. What if a screw falls out, what if a part breaks. It’s a good idea to carry a small parts bin of hardware with you at all times. Pack the bin with an assortment of screws, nuts, set-screws, body pins, flanged bushings for the steering knuckles, axles pins and washers in case something falls off on a run. Next you’ll want to carry some more substantial parts like a spare shock, some spare links, a spare center universal set-up. An extra servo horn or even and extra servo.

Tools- You know those little bags of allen wrenches and the box wrench that came with your kit? They make great lightweight travel tools and can fix most of the issues you’ll have to deal with on your rig. Now granted hand tools make the job easier, carry the basics, 1.5mm, 2.0mm and 2.5mm hex drivers; 5.5mm and 7.0mm nut drivers, long nose pliers, scissors and cutters can also be useful. Place them in a bag and put them in your backpack during your adventure.

Survival- Drivers can spend hours on the trails. Always carry water with you for hydration. Cisco Grove is at a higher elevation and having water on hand will keep you hydrated during your hikes. Also have some nutrition with you. Some power bars, trail mix or other foods can take the edge off your hunger while completing some of the long trail layouts. It’s also good to have a small first aid kit in case you get a scratch or scrape on the trail. Keep your cell phone with you, lights and a suitable back-pack to carry extra batteries is the best way to take on Axialfest.

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Prep For Fun

With rig prep out of the way, you should now be able to relax and enjoy the driving and scenery on the trails instead of being concerned your rig can handle the trek. If something does happen along the trails, don’t be shy and ask another driver for help borrow a tool or even a part to keep you going. The attendees at Axialfest are among the best enthusiasts in the industry and meeting new people in the camps or on the trails can turn into new friendships. See you at #AXIALFEST