50th BFGoodrich Tires SCORE Baja 1000 – The History

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Article Credit: SCORE® International
Photos By: getsomephoto.com

As we take our Axial Yeti™ SCORE® Trophy Trucks® out to play day after day, this year, above all others, we should stop for a minute to take a look at how the truck came to be.
The Axial SCORE® Truck was inspired by the full-scale trucks that have been racing in the BFGoodrich® Tires SCORE® Baja 1000, 2017 marks the 50th anniversary of this monumental event that changed the face of off-road racing.

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The long history of the event is surrounded by dedication and passion from its inception by the hands of the Legendary Mickey Thompson, to today’s SCORE® International organization. As the 50th Baja 1000 race draws near on November 12-18, SCORE® International has posted the lineage of the event along with incredible facts describing the highs, lows and background that has shaped this event to what it is today.

Much, much more than just a race, history shines brightly on next month’s 50th BFGoodrich Tires SCORE Baja 1000 pre-race festivities for final round of four-race 2017 SCORE World Desert Championship  includes SEMA SCORE Baja 1000 Experience, presented by BFGoodrich Tires Oct. 30-Nov. 3 at Las Vegas Convention Center; SCORE Baja 1000 qualifying for SCORE Trophy Truck at Las Vegas Motor Speedway Off-Road Track at 6 p.m. Oct. 31; Granddaddy of All Desert Races to be televised on El Rey Network.

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ENSENADA, Mexico— As the World Series is to baseball, the Super Bowl to football and the World Cup to soccer, the legendary SCORE Baja 1000 continues to stand as tall at the pinnacle of the motorsports world today as it did when it began 50 years ago. It is aptly referred to as the Granddaddy of All Desert Races. This year’s historic 50th golden anniversary race, sponsored for the first time by BFGoodrich Tires, will be held Nov. 12-18. It will start in the heart of Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico covering much of the majestic Baja California peninsula. It will finish in La Paz, Baja California Sur. It will be the 50th anniversary of the race shrouded in mystery that continues to lure the world’s best racers and adventurers from around the globe who all continue to share the dream to conquer the Baja. Racer registration continues at www.score-international.com for the iconic race. The race is the season-finale of the four-race 2017 SCORE World Desert Championship

ROOTS It’s the oldest and most well known of all desert races, and it remains as the single most appealing accomplishment to a driver. Since 1967, the mother of all desert races has been run over the mysterious, majestic Baja California peninsula every year except 1974 when an international fuel crisis forced a cancellation. The SCORE Baja 1000 has captured the imagination of the entire world as entries have come not only from every state in the United States, the District of Columbia and U.S. territories Guam and Puerto Rico, but also has attracted racers from Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Brazil, Belgium, Canada, Chile, Columbia, China, Cyprus, England, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Lithuania, Morocco, New Caledonia, New Zealand, Netherlands, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, Uruguay, Yugoslavia as well as the host country of Mexico. Over the years, SCORE races have been televised in more than 100 nations worldwide.

PRELUDE The first known record run occurred in 1962. Dave Ekins and Bill Robertson Jr. timed their trip from Tijuana to La Paz on a pair of Honda 250 motorcycles. Ekins made it in 39 hours, 54 minutes, Robertson in less than an hour slower. There were no official timers, of course, and to establish that they had made the trip, the two motorcycle racers time-stamped a sheet of paper in the Tijuana telegraph office and time-stamped it again at the telegraph office when they arrived in La Paz. They began their journey at midnight in Tijuana. Capitalizing on the pioneer effort of Ekins and Robertson, Chevrolet commissioned car builder Bill Stroppe to prepare a small fleet of trucks for the run to La Paz. Late that year they left Long Beach, Calif., and all of them reached La Paz. Advertising and publicity campaigns heralded the feat as “the roughest run under the sun.”

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STILL NO. 1 For the last two years, readers of USA Today newspaper have voted the SCORE Baja 1000 as the No. 1 motorsports event in the world. “Without the SCORE Baja 1000, there just wouldn’t be any desert racing,” said Roger Norman, SCORE International’s President and CEO. “The SCORE Baja 1000 continues to draw interest from all over the world and we now find second, third and even fourth generation racers appearing at the starting line with their family patriarchs cheering for their off-spring. This event continues to be the focal point of the SCORE World Desert Championship each year the celebration of our 50th anniversary will surely add another colorful chapter to the golden legacy of the SCORE Baja 1000.” 1967 Enthusiast Ed Pearlman founded the National Off Road Racing Association (NORRA) and established the Mexican 1000. It started officially in Tijuana on October 31, 1967 with 68 entries. They actually motored at leisure speeds to Ensenada and restarted the next day. NORRA continued to organize the Mexican 1000, which came to be known as the Baja 1000. In 1968, Pearlman moved the start of the race to Ensenada, where it stayed with one exception until 1993. In 1972 NORRA started at Mexicali and ran the first half of the race down the east coast of the peninsula through the treacherous Three Sisters section. Pre-running for this race, Parnelli Jones and Walker Evans were among a group of competitors who nearly got swept out to sea during a tropical storm. NORRA’s last race was in 1972. At that point, Mexican officials revoked NORRA’s permits to stage races in Baja. In 1973, a domestic group called the Baja Sports Committee produced the race.

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NEW BEGINNINGS After the fuel crisis of 1974 forced local officials to cancel the event, SCORE International, founded by the late Mickey Thompson and headed soon after by Sal Fish (until 2012), was invited by the northern state of Baja California to hold the race in 1975. The SCORE Baja 1000 became a loop event starting and ending in Ensenada. Roger Norman purchased SCORE International from Fish on Dec. 20, 2012. In 1979, the government of Baja California Sur granted permission to resume the Ensenada-to-La Paz format and SCORE has used this route intermittently ever since. The 1979 race was notable for Walker Evans’ overall win in a Dodge truck, the first truck to win the overall title of the race.

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START/FINISH In its first 49 years, the SCORE Baja 1000 has started 42 times in Ensenada, three times in Mexicali (1972, 1993, 1994), twice in Tijuana (1967, 1995) once in Santo Tomas (1998) and once in Ojos Negros (1999). The legendary race has finished in Ensenada 24 times, in La Paz 20 times, in Mexicali two times (1993, 1994), twice in Cabo San Lucas (2000, 2007) and once in Ojos Negros (1999).

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FAMOUS The famous and not-so-famous have tried their hand at conquering the Baja and they have come from all walks of life. Mark Thatcher, son of Great Britain’s then-prime minister Margaret Thatcher, raced in the 1982 SCORE Baja 1000. Celebrities James Garner, Ted Nugent and the late Steve McQueen all battled the Baja in the early 1970s and many racers from other forms of motorsports crossed over to try their skills. Among the drivers from other arenas who have tested the Baja were Indy Car racers Rick and Roger Mears, Parnelli Jones, Danny Ongias, Danny Sullivan, Jimmy Vasser, Buddy Rice, Sebastien Bourdais, Oriol Servia, Roberto Guerrero, Michel Jourdain Jr., Johnny Unser and Mike and Robbie Groff, NASCAR’s Robby Gordon, Jimmie Johnson, Boris Said and Brendan Gaughan, SCCA legend Elliot Forbes-Robinson, World Rally Championships’ Armin Schwarz, Armin Kremer, Andreas Aigner and Harri Pavanpera,, world motorcycle champions Malcolm Smith, Larry Roeseler and Destry Abbott, Motocross legends Ricky Johnson and Jeremy McGrath, XGames star Travis Pastrana, drag racers Don Prudhomme and Larry Minor and legendary SCORE founder and motorsports innovator Mickey Thompson. The late Academy Award winning actor, racer and race team owner Paul Newman raced in the 2004 event. Jesse James, of ‘Monster Garage’ fame, and Hollywood film and TV star Patrick Dempsey both have raced in this classic several times.

LEGENDS This year’s race will commemorate the achievements of legendary desert racers like Rod Hall, Ron Bishop, Johnny Johnson, and Larry Roeseler. Hall, who will turn 80 on Nov. 22, has a record 24 class wins (including one overall win in 1969), and is the only racer who has competed in all 49 SCORE Baja 1000 races. Bishop was the only racer who competed in the first 40 SCORE Baja 1000 races all on a motorcycle. Hall will be racing this year in the Stock Full class with his son Chad Hall as he attempts to add to his untouchable legacy. Bishop, now deceased, was the only racer who competed every year of the first 40 on a motorcycle. Johnson, now retired, had 15 class wins, amazingly in eight different classes. Roeseler, has won 17 times in this race, including 13 overall wins (10 on a motorcycle). Roeseler will share driving duties this year in SCORE Trophy Truck with Luke McMillin in the No. 83 Ford F-150. Roeseler won the unlimited Class 1 for four consecutive years (2004-2007), driving with the youngest of three racing brothers, Troy Herbst, in the Smithbuilt-Ford open-wheel desert race car that was known as the ‘Land Shark’. Roeseler is the only racer in the history of the event to win the overall 4-wheel in a truck and also in a car as well as the overall 2-wheel title as well. In 2008, Roeseler split the driving with driver of record and team owner and now SCORE owner Roger Norman when they were the overall 4-wheel and SCORE Trophy Truck champions and the pair was second in 2009. In 2010, Roger Norman drove solo the length of the peninsula and finished third overall. Special history was also made in 2010 when the father/son team of Gustavo Vildosola Sr and Gustavo ‘Tavo’ Vildosola Jr, of Mexicali, drove to the overall 4-wheel and SCORE Trophy Truck victory to become the first Mexican nationals’ team to win the legendary race and it was a peninsula run from Ensenada to La Paz.

SAME SIREN Lured by the same siren that enraptured the Ekins brothers in the 1950s, the SCORE Baja 1000 remains as the No. 1 target of adventurers the world over, not to mention the cadre of pro and semi-pro desert racers who consider it the fitting climax to their racing season each year.

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THIS YEAR-SPLIT-START Commemorating the first race, motorcycle and quad classes will start at midnight (PT) on Wednesday, Nov. 15 and the car, truck and UTV classes will begin their journey in the elapsed-time race 10 hours later at 10 a.m. (PT) on Thursday, Nov. 16. While the fastest vehicles are expected to complete the course in approximately 20 hours, all vehicles will have 48 hours from the time each starts to complete the course and become an official finisher of the 50th anniversary race.

THE WHO The royalty of desert racing will be in this year’s field and leading the way will once again be the marquee SCORE Trophy Trucks, the SCORE-created class for high-tech, 900-horsepower unlimited production trucks. There are already 37 SCORE Trophy Trucks entered in this year’s celebratory race. Among the entries in SCORE Trophy Truck are No. 11 Rob MacCachren/Jason Voss, No. 1 Carlos ‘Apdaly’ Lopez/Juan C. Lopez, No. 77 Robby Gordon, No. 31 Andy McMillin/Tavo Vildosola, No. 97 B.J. Baldwin/Rodimiro Amaya, No. 15 Billy Wilson/Chad Bunch, No. 4 Justin Matney/Josh Daniel, No. 23 Dan McMillin/Gary Weyhrich, No. 19 Tim Herbst/P.J. Jones, No. 7 Bryce Menzies, No. 83 Luke McMillin/Larry Roeseler, No. 91 Troy Herbst/Brett Sourapas, No. 3 Mark Post/Ed Herbst/Kyle LeDuc, No. 9 Armin Schwarz/Eduardo Laguna, No. 16 Cameron Steele/Cody Stuart/Pat Dean/Rene Brugger, No. 14 Cameron Steele/Cody Stuart/Pat Dean/Rene Brugger, No. 41 Justin Lofton/Matt Loiodice, No. 76 Jesse Jones/Austin Jones/Toby Price, No. 21 Pat O’Keefe/Mark McMillin, No. 5L Clyde Stacy/Jeff Geiser (SCORE TT Legend class) and No. 21L Gus Vildosola Sr/Rodrigo Ampudia Sr/Scott Bailey (SCORE TT Legend).

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THE WHERE To date, there are 206 total entries from 34 U.S. States, two U.S. Territories and 19 countries officially signed up to compete. In addition to the United States, the U.S. Territories of Guam and Puerto Rico and the host country Mexico, the other countries with racers entered are Australia, Austria, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, England, Finland, France, Germany, India, Israel, Italy, Japan, New Zealand, Peru, South Africa and Spain.

WHO ELSE BUT SAL! Sal Fish, 78, the iconic desert racing promoter who owned SCORE International for 38 years, will be the Grand Marshal for November’s 50th BFGoodrich Tires SCORE Baja 1000. Off-Road Motorsports Hall of Famer Fish, who lives in Malibu, Calif., has earned more awards in his life than most racers have won races and was the face of SCORE from 1974 until he sold the company to Roger and Elise Norman on Dec. 20, 2012. A graduate from the University of San Francisco, Fish had risen to the top as the Publisher of Hot Rod Magazine when Mickey Thompson, who founded SCORE in 1973, recruited Fish to be the President of SCORE.

DUST 2 GLORY From award-winning documentary filmmaker Brown, ‘Dust 2 Glory,’ scheduled to premiere nationwide on Dec. 6, chronicled each of the four races in the 2016 SCORE World Desert Championship. Brown’s original Dusty to Glory, released in 2005, became an iconic classic showcasing the legendary SCORE Baja 1000. D2G, which began shooting at the 2015 SCORE Baja 1000, continued up close and personal coverage capturing the robust racers in their amazing adventures in Mexico’s majestic Baja California peninsula through all four spectacular 2016 races. Executive Producer is BCII’s Bud Brutsman. Tickets for the special, one-night Dec. 6 nationwide premiere will go on sale on Oct. 23. For information regarding tickets and theater locations, visit https://www.fathomevents.com/events/dust-2-glory.

EL REY NETWORK The four-race 2017 SCORE World Desert Championship in Baja California, Mexico along with the SEMA SCORE Baja 1000 Experience/SCORE Baja 1000 Qualifying in Las Vegas are all airing on El Rey Network in the United States. International distribution is by way of syndication. The season-ending 50th SCORE Baja 1000 will have a two-hour show produced while the other race shows are each one-hour telecasts. El Rey Network is available in 45 million homes across the country through cable and OTT providers and via satellite on DirecTV Channel 341 and Dish Network Channel 253. For more information on how to watch El Rey visit http://elreynetwork.com.

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SCORE SPONSORS… Official SCORE Sponsors: BFGoodrich Tires-Official Tire & Official Race Title Sponsor, Monster Energy-Official Energy Drink, King Shocks-Official Shock Absorber, RACELINE Wheels-Official Wheel, Axial R/C-Official R/C Vehicle, El Rey Network-Official Television Partner, Wide Open Excursions-Official Arrive and Drive Company, Crystal Bay Casino-Official Casino. SCORE Official Partners: PCI Race Radios, 4 Wheel Parts, The Satellite Phone Store, Satellite Del Norte, Instant Mexico Auto Insurance, CETTO Vineyards. Additional SCORE Associate Partners: Proturismo Ensenada, Baja California Secretary of Tourism, Baja California Sur State Government, Baja California Sur Secretary of Tourism, Mexicali Ayuntamiento, COTUCO Mexicali/San Felipe, Cruz Roja Mexicana, Corporate Helicopters, McKenzie’s Performance Products, Advanced Color Graphics. Tijuana SCORE Desert Challenge Special Partners: XXII Ayuntamiento de Tijuana, Baja California Secretary of Tourism, Tijuana Comite de Turismo and Convenciones, Comite de Marcadotecnia Turistica, Asociacion de Hoteles del Noroeste. For more information regarding SCORE, visit the official website of the SCORE World Desert Championship at www.SCOREInternational.com.

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To see all of the SCORE® Baja 1000 Milestones including: All-Time Finish Sites, Top Total Starters, Top Total Finishers, Top Total Starters and Top Total Finishers; visit: 50th BFGoodrich Tires SCORE Baja 1000

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck – Rivas Concepts Long Term Testing

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This is one of the first RTR version’s of Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Trucks out to the public.   I have had this truck since October 24th 2015.

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The very first run Dominic Longoria and I took it to a local race track and did a short video.

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This truck has been run a lot, I stopped counting after 48 battery packs. It has been a blast.

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Its been jumped, crashed, kind of abused. Hundreds of people have drove this very truck! It has been to a few events as a demo truck for people to drive, before it was released to market.

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It was driven by some random people and a few 1:1 MINT400 drivers. So it has some miles on it for sure. I have had a servo horn screw back out and then in the month of May it took a 10-foot drop breaking the first part. So it has seen seven months of total abuse.  If you drive hard or abuse your trucks, parts will break and you may get away with it once or twice, but its flirting with the breaking point. I have heard people say these are designed to be abused so they shouldn’t break… Umm, I disagree and agree… While I do agree this rig is designed for abuse, I don’t agree that it shouldn’t break. That would mean that some parts are going to be way too soft. Breakage is something that is going to happen. It’s all a sliding scale as you don’t want it too hard or too soft. This truck has been driven pretty hard by lots of people and it stayed together beyond my initial expectation. Its taken a lot of abuse and It took a big drop to break it.

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So here it sits at AXIALFEST 2016. This truck has never had any maintenance done. I do not recommend this at all, but I am going for a true longevity test. The wheels have never even been taken off. Zero upgrades and none of the parts have ever been changed out.

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While at AXIALFEST2016 Johnathan Schultz said it was dirty, I said its never been worked on. He took it as a challenge and stripped this bad boy down.

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Transmission dropped out along with a few debris and about to be opened for the very first time.

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Everything still looks good! I was expecting a completely dry transmission and some metal shavings. 48+ battery packs and tons of desert dust berms, I’m impressed!

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It did managed to get some dust in the receiver compartment, but Las Vegas has some seriously silty areas, so I expected this to be a lot dirtier.

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I think you can tell how much run time and or abuse this truck has seen! The control arms and pan tell the stories of all the good times this rig has given.

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Again I am shocked, the front diff still has grease.

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There is no visible damage when the front end is opened.

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The internals of the rear diff still look really good. If you only knew how many hours of drive time this drivetrain has seen.

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“It might be a racer thing,” Johnathan stated as he took apart every nut and bolt to clean it. But I was also reminded of a rumor I once heard about Johnathan’s father taking apart ScottG’s rig in the middle of a race to help him. Something about half in the garbage and the other half in a cardboard box and handed back to him and their heat was about to start… so I watched Johnathan like a hawk! I want this rig up and running to continue this long term test.

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It’s down to the floor pan. Now comes the cleaning.

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Some simple green, brush, and lots of elbow grease. This little venture has worked well into the night. Since we are at AXIALFEST2016 as part of the early crew setting up, we have a downtime in the evenings and we are just R/C 247′ing up!

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Looks so much better than from when we started.

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The rear axle is cleaned and put back together.

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Transmission looks like knew, its hard to believe it looks this good after all its been through. It spins smooth, no squeaks, or noises.

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Stock ESC, servo, and motor going back in.

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If you scroll back to the top of the page you can see what a difference this is. One thing I will recommend if doing this, get new bearings before you do it. We replaced a few plastic ball ends, simply because they were worn and had some slop. Put shocks back in same position as stock, and I have added some 30 weight oil to the shocks, not full, just enough to lube them.

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My thoughts on the Axial Yeti Trophy Truck.
I’ve really truly enjoyed driving this thing! It reacts and moves how I imagine a real SCORE Trophy Truck would. But hey, that’s the fun of R/C! The rear suspension drop is awesome to watch in action! It handles well out of the box, I couldn’t recommend this as a track truck, but I am not a track racer. The rear locker is fantastic off road, not sure if that’s beneficial on a track. I would recommend a higher pinion for a little more speed. If you purchase this for kids it’s plenty fast, 3S is the way to go. I have heard people are ripping the lexan bodies after a while, I had a wrap done on mine from SOR.Racing and you can see mine has not ripped or torn. Axial also has the Retro Bodies available. I have owned other trucks and you can only go fast so many times and jump so many things before you get bored. This is so scale I run it all over and don’t lose interest. It’s still fun because of how it runs and reacts as a whole.

It was definitely the “reset button” on 1/10 scale off road trucks in my opinion! When “short course” trucks came into the market there has been two groups of people who were attracted to the segment, but things change and transition as a natural progression. One group has almost transitioned back to what racing was prior to the short course trucks.

The other group are those who saw this as inspiration for the next step in scale progression with a live solid axle like the full size big desert racing machines called TROPHY TRUCKS! A Trophy Truck is NOT a short course truck! So thank you AXIAL for recognizing the difference and containing to appeal to the scale enthusiast!

While it took Axial a while to get here, it was a risky move as a business in the public face of R/C short course racing. It’s been funny to watch as most want to categorize the Yeti TT as a short course truck, that it is NOT! This rig offers everyone that same chance to hit the “RESTART BUTTON” on FUN! This is just like what short course trucks did when they came onto the market. For the scale community, this is our truck and the Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck is a MUST OWN truck!

In Axial we trust, scale we must!
Just my opinion,
Rivas Concepts

Adding Lights to the Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck

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Words and photos by Tony Phalen

A couple weeks ago I showed you how to install headlights, taillights and a roof mounted light bar on your Yeti SCORE Retro Trophy Truck body. It was a pretty simple process – but what if you have a standard Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck body? Well, thankfully the procedure is the same with just a few minor tweaks.

You’ll need a few tools to complete this job, listed here:

Tools
1. Body reamer or something similar to enlarge the holes in the plastic headlight/taillight parts.
2. Shoo Goo or something similar to secure the LEDs in place.
3. Hobby Knife.
4. Silver Sharpie. Optional, but great for that extra detail.
5. Tape. Black for securing wires to the cage, clear for securing wires to the inside of the body.
6. Y-connector for combining the front and rear light strings into one.
7. 6″ (or longer) servo lead extension.

I’ve also included all the Axial parts needed at the bottom of the article.

Let’s get started!

Step 1

Adding Lights to the Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck
The first step will be to remove and modify the front and rear light buckets to accept a pair of LEDs a piece. The front bucket has only 1 hole – the left red arrow shows where you can ream out the hole to add a 2nd LED. Ream only a little at a time, test fitting the LED until it pushes in nice and snug. The rear bucket (on the right) has two holes, but you’ll need to make the lower one a little bigger to accept the larger LED. Again, open the hole a little at a time until the LED sits nice and snug.

I added a little detail to the front light buckets using a silver Sharpie. It’s not necessary by any means, but I do like the way it highlights the all-black buckets.

Step 2

Adding Lights to the Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck  Re-install the front light buckets to the body and press the LEDs in place. Use a dab of Shoo Goo to hold the LEDs in place, letting it dry thoroughly. Route the wires as needed using clear tape to hold them down. Try to keep them in the raised sections of the body so the tires won’t hit them when traveling through rough, rocky terrain. I’ve also installed one of the 3-Port High-Output LED Controllers on the front hood. Route the left and right headlight strings over and plug them into the side-by-side plugs.

Step 3

Adding Lights to the Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck
Using the same procedure as we used for the front, install the buckets and LEDs to the rear of the TT.

Step 4

Adding Lights to the Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck
Run the LED power wires along the rear cage as shown, using the black tape to hold them in place. If you want to do a super trick, feed the wires through some black shrink tubing prior to attaching them.

Step 5

Adding Lights to the Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck
The 2nd 3-Port High-Output LED Controller is mounted to the underside of the roof. Route the left and right taillight strings along the cage and plug them into the side-by-side plugs in the controller. I would suggest mounting the controller so that side-by-side plugs face the rear; if you decide to install a roof-mounted lightbar, it can plug into the single high-output plug facing the front.

Step 6

Adding Lights to the Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck
Take both leads from the 3-Port High-Output Controllers and run them to either side of the TT body, using the clear tape to keep them in place. You may notice that the leads use 2 wires (and a mini-JST plug) while the Y-connector uses a 3-wire plug. That’s OK - just make sure that when you connect them, the black wire mates up to the black wire (or in this case, the brown wire).

Step 7

Adding Lights to the Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck
Flip your TT over and remove the little hatch on the bottom of the chassis. This reveals the receiver we’ll need to plug the light string into. Pop the receiver off the tape and pull it out slightly, like the picture. You’ll also, at this time, want to remove the top black spacer in the clear silicone plug (the spacer is shown just to the left of the receiver box). Now, carefully feed your 6″ extension from the topside of the truck down to the receiver box. It’s a little tricky and you might have to push some other wires out of the way, but it is possible – and I suggest doing it from the top down.

Once you have it through, plug the 6″ extension into port #3, making sure the black wire (or brown wire) is facing the same way as the black wires already installed. Now, press the extension wire into the clear silicone plug, taking up the space of the black spacer you removed earlier.

Step 8

Adding Lights to the Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck
Flip the truck over and you should have about this much of the 6″ extension left sticking out. Adjust how much of the extension is left (if necessary), flip the TT back over and press the receiver back into the box. Coil up any excess extension wire, push it into the receiver box and re-install the receiver box door.

Step 9

Adding Lights to the Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck
Set the driver interior back into place, mate the Y-connector on the body to the 6″ extension and re-install the body.

Our SCORE Trophy Truck body is now ready for some night time driving. Plug the battery in, flip the switch on and check out your fantastic work! Here’s an example of how it should look when you’re finished:

Adding Lights to the Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck

Adding Lights to the Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck

Here’s the list of the Axial parts used in this article:
AX31097 Axial 3-Port High Output LED Controller
AX24252 Axial Double LED Light String (White LED) – Qty 4

Adding Lights to the Axial Yeti SCORE Retro Trophy Truck

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Words and photos by Tony Phalen

Did you know that the Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck comes pre-configured for LED lighting? Yup, that’s right, all you have to do is attain and install the LEDs, route the wiring to the receiver and enjoy some brightly lit evening drives.

In this article, I’ll take you through the step-by-step process of installing a full set of LEDs in the front and rear buckets as well as adding an Axial Universal Rigid Light Bar Set. In addition to all the lighting components (listed at the end of the article), you’ll also need a few other tools to make the installation easy.

Tools
1. Body reamer or something similar to enlarge the holes in the plastic headlight/taillight parts and for making holes in the body.
2. Shoo Goo or something similar to secure the LEDs in place.
3. Hobby Knife.
4. Silver Sharpie. Optional, but great for that extra detail.
5. Tape. Black for securing wires to the cage, clear for securing wires to the inside of the body.
6. Y-connector for combining the front and rear light strings into one.
7. 6″ (or longer) servo lead extension.

Step 1

Adding Lights to the Axial Yeti SCORE Retro Trophy Truck
Before installing the LEDs in the light buckets, there is a little bit of prep work that needs to be done first. The buckets have provisions for 2 LEDs; 1 standard headlight and one smaller turn signal. Since I wanted to have both sockets use the super bright LEDs (for a headlight and driving/fog light), I had to use the reamer to open the hole up in the smaller socket to fit the larger LED. Widen the hole in small increments, test fitting the LED a couple times until the fit is nice and snug.

For some added detail, I highlighted the area with a silver Sharpie. I think it turned out pretty cool looking and having it mounted behind the Lexan body helps protect it.

Step 2

Adding Lights to the Axial Yeti SCORE Retro Trophy Truck
Once you have the front buckets mounted, press fit the LEDs into the them. We have two solutions to securing the LEDs; you can use the supplied cap and screw (left LED) or Shoo Goo (right LED). Either method works great but since I didn’t have enough of the small 2-56 screws to complete the project, I opted for Shoo Goo.

Step 3

Adding Lights to the Axial Yeti SCORE Retro Trophy Truck
Using the same procedure, install the buckets and LEDs on the rear of the Retro TT body. You’ll need to ream out the smaller hole in this bucket as well. Since I was using the red tail light stickers on the rear of the Retro body, I opted to use white LEDs. You could also use red ones here instead for more red lighting – I listed the red LED part numbers at the end as well.

Step 4

Adding Lights to the Axial Yeti SCORE Retro Trophy Truck
Route the rear LED power leads along the rear cage and secure with the black tape. This helps keep the wires away from the spinning tires. If you have some available, you can feed the wires through some shrink tubing for added protection.

Step 5

Adding Lights to the Axial Yeti SCORE Retro Trophy Truck
Build and mount Axial’s roof-mounted LED bar. A slit can be cut into the roof to pass the wires through. We won’t get into detail about building it – it’s pretty simple. Just take a little extra care to make sure it’s mounted square on the roof.

Step 6

Adding Lights to the Axial Yeti SCORE Retro Trophy Truck
Flip the Retro TT body over and feed both the front and rear LED power leads into an AX31097 3-Port High Output LED Controller (use double-sided tape to secure the controllers on the body). The roof mounted LED light bar will connect to the high-output port on the rear 3-Port High Output LED Controller. Masterfully tape all the wires down using the clear tape.

Step 7

Adding Lights to the Axial Yeti SCORE Retro Trophy Truck
Feed the 3-Port High Output LED Controller leads to the side of the body and tape them down using the clear tape. Take your Y-connector and connect them as shown. The LED controller wires use a 2-wire, mini JST plug – our Y-connector has standard 3-wire plug. Just make sure the black wires match up and you’ll be good to go. You can add a little extra tape here to secure any additional wires.

Step 8

Adding Lights to the Axial Yeti SCORE Retro Trophy Truck
Next, we’ll be installing the 6″ extension, so start by removing the little door on the bottom of your TT to expose the receiver compartment. You may need to ‘pop’ the receiver off of the tape used to secure it to make this a little easier. You’ll also need to remove the little black spacer used in the clear silicone grommet. We’ll be filling that space with the new 6″ wire.

I found it way easier to feed the 6″ extension down to the box from the top of the truck and into the box. Insert the 6″ extension plug into your receiver with the negative wire (black or brown) towards the outside of the receiver. Press the wire into the clear silicone grommet, making sure it’s down below the top of the grommet.

Step 9

Adding Lights to the Axial Yeti SCORE Retro Trophy Truck
Turn the truck over and inspect how much of the 6″ extension you have available. This picture shows an adequate amount you’ll need. Flip the TT back over, press the receiver back into place and coil up any additional wire into the receiver box. Replace the receiver box cover.

Step 10

Adding Lights to the Axial Yeti SCORE Retro Trophy Truck
Install the plastic interior in place, connect the lighting power wires (black to brown in this case) and fit the Retro body to your TT. We’ve left enough slack in the wire to remove the body without having to unplug the wires each time, but if you feel it’s too long you can always shorten the lead by pulling a little more into the receiver box.

And just like that, we’ve got some very bright lights on our Retro bodied TT! Here’s an example of how it should look when you’re finished:

Adding Lights to the Axial Yeti SCORE Retro Trophy Truck

Adding Lights to the Axial Yeti SCORE Retro Trophy Truck

As promised, here’s the full list of the Axial parts used in this article:
AX31310 Axial TT-380 Retro Trophy Truck Body
AX31152 Axial Universal Rigid Light Bar Set
AX31097 Axial 3-Port High Output LED Controller
AX31098 Axial 8 LED Light String (White LED) – Qty 2
AX24252 Axial Double LED Light String (White LED) – Qty 4

JPRC Yeti Trophy Truck Epic Trail Run – VIDEO

JPRC_Yeti_RedBull_TT_500px

Slow motion video, long wheel travel, wheels tucking up into a Trophy Truck body mixed in with off road bashing is a lot like attempting to say “NO” to that last cookie in the cookie jar. It’s fair to assume that cookie didn’t stand a chance, just like this video had to be watched. If you’ve been following JPRC’s YouTube page you’ll notice he’s a fan of Trophy Trucks, if not, make sure to take a few moments and check out his page.

Axial R/C Inc. Teams With SCORE International 2016 – Official R/C Vehicles

news_score2016

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
(Mission Viejo, CA) February 9, 2016.

Axial R/C Inc., A subsidiary of Hobbico Inc., is proud to announce Axial as the Official R/C Vehicles of the Baja 500, Baja 1000 and SCORE International.

So much focus in the R/C industry is placed on short course off road racing. It makes perfect sense, as it is easy to gather lots of people into a confined area to experience off road racing vehicles. What many people don’t know is that short course off road racing was born in the desert. What short course promoters are attempting to do is bring desert racing to the masses. What is lost in this process is the adventure. In true Axial style, we are all about chasing adventure. In this case, Axial R/C has partnered with SCORE International to support further growth of the off road racing that started it all.

The Baja 500 and Baja 1000 are two of the most recognizable off road racing events on the planet. The machines, the people and the experiences of these and all of SCORE’s events are the inspiration for many of today’s off road enthusiasts. Axial fans and consumers are driven by adventure, getting out there and experiencing the relationship of man and machine in the wild. Axial will be taking an in depth look at what drives all of these individuals to push themselves and their machines to the absolute limit to conquer Baja.

Axial will continue to support the world’s premier desert racing championship through sponsorship of the series, helping to bring the off-road action to your living room through extensive CBS Sports coverage. Axial will also continue to support its Yeti Trophy Truck RTR vehicle as it grows in popularity amongst enthusiasts world wide.

Get your passport ready and make an adventure of it as the SCORE INTERNATIONAL  2016 event schedule is posted: http://score-international.com/2016-race-schedule/

BAJA_MAP002-01

Feb. 25-28 30th Bud Light SCORE SAN FELIPE 250
San Felipe, Baja California, Mexico
(one loop, Approx. 250 miles)

April 14-17 2nd Bud Light SCORE BAJA SUR 500
La Paz, Baja California Sur, Mexico
(one loop, Approx. 500 total miles)

June 1-5 48th Bud Light SCORE BAJA 500
Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico
(one loop, Approx. 500 miles)

Sept. 14-18 Bud Light SCORE DESERT CHALLENGE
presented by Rosarito Beach
Rosarito Beach, Baja California, Mexico
(15-16–mile loop, multi-lap, two-day race)

Nov. 16-20 49th Bud Light SCORE BAJA 1000
Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico
(One Loop, Approx. 800 miles)

About Axial
Founded in 2005, Axial R/C, Inc. has quickly became a global brand leader of hobby grade radio controlled products as Axial is a company of enthusiasts for enthusiasts. We manufacture chassis and accessory products predominantly for the Rock Crawling and Overland Adventure segments, with design emphasis on rugged construction and scale realism. Axial is regularly involved in local and national events which allow us to keep our finger on the pulse of R/C culture, thus earning us awards year after year, including “Best Truck”, “Most Innovative”, “Best Engineered Product of the Year”, and “People’s Choice.” For more information on Axial and Axial products please visit www.axialracing.comtwitter.com/axialracingfacebook.com/axialincyoutube.com/axialvideos

About SCORE International
The World’s Foremost Desert Racing Organization, SCORE International was founded in 1973 by the late motorsports innovator Mickey Thompson and continues today under the ownership and director of former SCORE Trophy Truck racing champion Roger Norman. The five-race, internationally-televised SCORE World Desert Championship features 35 Pro and six Sportsman classes for cars, trucks, UTVs, motorcycles and quads. The series is televised nationally on the CBS Sports Network with international syndication for each of the one-hour programs. The flagship event of the SCORE World Desert Championship is the iconic SCORE Baja 1000, the granddaddy of all desert races. The 2015 SCORE Baja 1000 will air as a two-hour special on the CBS Sports Network. For more information regarding SCORE International, visit www.score-international.com

Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build

tech_yetitrophytruckfulloption

Words and photos by Tony Phalen

Whenever I get a new vehicle, I like to take the first couple weeks to just drive it in box-stock form to learn about its traits; how it handles, any quirky nuances, etc. During this time I also take some time to review any hop ups that might become available, giving me an idea on how my long-term upgrade process is going to play out. Thankfully, the SCORE Trophy Truck shares the same platform as the Yeti Rock Racer, which means that there are a slew of performance goodies already available. Armed with a bag of aluminum bits, I decided it was time to install them prior to getting this rig all dirty. Not only did that make it a lot easier to deal with (read: no dirt!), it also looks much prettier in pictures. Time for an Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build!

Step 1

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Here are the parts I’ll be installing in this article. I’ve got quite a bit of work ahead; shocks, gears, machined parts and turnbuckles. A full list of the parts I installed is included at the bottom of this article.

Step 2

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Since I’m going to need to remove the center transmission for upgrades, I disconnected the motor wires from the ESC. Pay attention to how the wires connect; if you have a photographic memory, you’re good to go. If not (like me), you can mark them to keep things straight. I put one silver mark for the A wire, 2 for the B and 3 for the C.

Step 3

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build I’m going to be working on the front end of the SCORE TT first. I started by removing the top deck support brace. It requires the removal of 10 screws in two different lengths so, to keep things organized, I put them back in the holes after removal.

Step 4

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Once the top deck support brace has been lifted off, removal of the front clip is easy. There are 4 screws underneath the chassis and the two hinge pin screws. I also disconnected the fixed-length steering turnbuckles as well – I’m replacing them with adjustable ones.

Step 5

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Separate the gearbox from the shock tower by removing the 4 screws holding them together. I’m only working with the differential at this time so I set the rest of the front clip assembly aside. Note the orientation of the diff in the gearbox. You’ll want to make sure you re-install it the same way.

Step 6

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Next, I removed the differential and bevel gear assemblies from the gearbox. I’m replacing them with the AX30395 Heavy Duty Bevel Gear Set shown in the picture. One thing to notice is that the assemblies have straight cut gears; this design is pretty strong and easy to machine. The new HD versions are helical cut, or machined with a slight angle in them. These are great for high-torque applications like crawlers or, in this case, hardcore trophy trucks! To replace, remove the 4 screws on the diff to release the gear, set the new gear in place and re-install the 4 screws. If you’re the tinkering type, you might think about adding some optional fluid to the diff prior to putting it back together (I did, 1000wt). The HD bevel gear is a one-piece unit so replacing the stock part is a simple pull-and-replace operation. One final step I performed was to remove the rubber stops that are installed in each diff outdrive. If you hold the diff on its side, you’ll see them down inside there. These are used to keep the dogbones tight and prevent them from ejecting during a hard crash, however they hinder the up and down suspension movement slightly. Since I’ll be replacing the dogbones with universals, they’re not needed anymore.

Step 7

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Next up was the AX31170 Machined Front Shock Tower and AX31169 Machined Body Post Mount. These parts are a direct bolt on and work the same as the stock parts, however as you can see there are a few extra pieces. I’ll get to those in a bit.

Step 8

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build I disassembled the front clip down to the front shock tower assembly. The only part I’ll be reusing from this is the plastic body post.

Step 9

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build I attached the AX31169 Machined Body Post Mount to the AX31170 Machined Front Shock Tower. Since this is an aluminum-to-aluminum connection, I used a dab of threadlocker on the screws to make sure they don’t loosen up. I slid the plastic body post into the mount and used the screws provided to secure.

Step 10

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build I’m ditching the stock dogbone setup for a set of Axial’s AX31135 94mm Universal Axle Set. These come as a pair, are pre-assembled and slide right into place.

Step 11

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build I re-assembled the front clip – the new shock tower to the gearbox and the front bumper to the tower. I left the shocks off for now since I was replacing them with a full set of Axial’s Icons. You can also see the aluminum upper shock mounts that are included with the aluminum shock tower.

Step 12

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build For strength and additional tuning, I’m adding a full set of front adjustable turnbuckles (AX31249 Yeti Turnbuckle Set). This kit includes an excellent build sheet, so assembly is very easy. Just build the turnbuckles to the appropriate lengths and you’re good to go. I would suggest keeping them separate during the build so you don’t mix up the steering links with the camber links; the two are different.

Step 13

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Before attaching the front clip back on the TT, I need to do a little work on the transmission. I pulled it from the TT and removed the gear cover, motor, plastic backing plate and plastic motor mount.

Step 14

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build I installed Axial’s AX31156 Machined Adjustable Motor Mount, a 2-piece unit that includes the main mount that attaches to the gearbox and a mount that attaches to the motor. The motor mount part swivels to adjust the gear mesh and uses an upper clamp to keep it securely in place. Because it’s aluminum, this system is SUPER strong and helps pull unwanted heat away from the motor. I re-attached the plastic backing plate followed by the spur gear assembly (I used Axial’s AX31161 32P 64T Steel Spur Gear and AX31164 Machined Slipper Plates in place of the stock parts). These upgrades look awesome and should make the gearbox virtually bulletproof. After I tightened everything up, I went ahead and re-installed the gearbox into the TT.

Step 15

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Time to get the front back together, so I started by sliding the front clip onto the chassis and securing with the 4 screws from underneath as well as the two hinge pins. I made sure to key the center universal into the outdrive located under the transmission. It’s a little tricky, so I would suggest rotating the transmission gears (using the back tires) until you see the slots in the outdrive; this will make it easier to key the universal. Next, I slid the front axles through the steering blocks, attaching the wheel hexes to keep them in place. I installed the steering and camber links, making sure to key the axle bones into the outdrives. A little care has to be taken here to make sure the axle bones stay inside the outdrive.

Step 16

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Now that the front is back on and looking good, it was time to move on to the rear clip and the installation of a lot of performance parts. The first thing I needed to do is separate the rear clip from the rest of the chassis; front cage screws, rear cage screws and the 4-link mounts. If you did it right, this is what you should be left with.

Step 17

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build My first plan of attack is the rear differential. To extract it, I needed to remove the diff cover, the straight axle hub carriers and the axles (just pull them out slightly). I also removed the two plastic diff-capture plates that hold the diff in place. Note the orientation of the diff gear inside the housing.

Step 18

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Replacement of the diff gear and bevel gear is the same as the front. Once completed, re-assemble by inserting the diff gear, diff-capture plates and axles (key and slide back into place). I installed the optional AX30789 AR60 OCP Aluminum Straight Axle Hub Carrier.

Step 19

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build To strengthen the rear end, I replaced the stock plastic 4-link mount with the AX31165 Machined 4-Link Mounts as well as added Axial’s AX31244 Upper Link Plate Set. Both are direct bolt ons; the Upper Link Plate Set uses existing holes in the plastic links.

Step 20

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build I also installed Axial’s AX31245 Lower Link Plate Set. These also bolt right on using existing holes in the plastic links. I would suggest installing and tightening the two end screws while leaving the centermost pair loose. They can be tightened up when you re-install the shocks and anti-roll bar.

Step 21

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Here is the rear clip assembled with all of the aluminum parts installed. You can see I’ve also added the AX31166 Machined Shock Mount Plates, AX30830 AR60 OCP Machined Link Mounts and AX31167 Machined Sway Bar Clamps. The Machined Sway Bar Clamps are a little hard to see, but I’ve added some additional pictures at the end that help show their install. When re-attaching the rear clip back to the chassis, add some threadlocker to the screws that secure the aluminum 4-link mounts. This will help prevent the screws from backing out when you’re out having a good time.

Step 22

Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build While I loved the look of the King shocks, I couldn’t pass up installing a full set of Axial’s Icons. Per the included instructions, I built a set of front and rears and installed them in place of the Kings. I have an additional set of shocks to create a dual-shock setup, but I’m going to give it a whirl with the single shocks first. The dual-shock install (and tuning) will be for a later article. As you can see from the pictures, the aluminum parts look awesome and will provide additional strength as well as give the truck a bit more of a ‘factory’ look. Time for me to get outside and get this thing dirty!

Here’s the list of parts used in this article.

AX30395 Heavy Duty Bevel Gear Set – 38T/13T (x2)

AX30789 AR60 OCP Aluminum Straight Axle Hub Carrier

AX30829 AR60 OCP Machined Low-Profile Differential Cover

AX30830 AR60 OCP Machined Link Mount

AX31135 Universal Axle Set 94mm

AX30836 Aluminum Servo Horn 25T

AX31136 Icon 87-125mm Aluminum Shock Set

AX31156 Machined Adjustable Motor Mount

AX31161 Steel Spur Gear 32P 64T

AX31164 Machined Slipper Plate

AX31165 Machined 4 Link Mounts

AX31166 Machined Shock Mount Plates

AX31167 Machined Sway Bar Clamp

AX31169 Machined Body Post Mount

AX31170 Machined Front Shock Tower

AX31172 Icon 67-90mm Aluminum Shock Set

AX31244 Upper Link Plate Set

AX31245 Lower Link Plate Set

AX31249 Yeti Turnbuckle Set

Additional Photos Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build Axial Yeti SCORE Trophy Truck Full Option Build IMG_0552 IMG_0557 IMG_0555 IMG_0556

SCORE Dirty Dozen–Young Guns of 2015 SCORE World Desert Championship, 8.19

Words: SCORE International WP_DirtyDozen_Pt1_500x220

RENO, Nev., USA—Helping to promote the new generation of desert racers, SCORE International has released the current SCORE Dirty Dozen–the ‘Young Guns’ of the 2015 SCORE World Desert Championship. All less than 30 years old and regulars in this year’s series, the SCORE Dirty Dozen represents a cross section of the next generation of SCORE desert racers that have made and continue to emblazon the world of desert racing with their flamboyant skill and dynamic persona. SCORE, the world’s foremost desert racing organization, features Pro and Sportsman classes for cars, trucks, UTVs, motorcycles and ATVs. The SCORE Dirty Dozen represents several of the categories of classes with four who race in SCORE Trophy Truck, the marquee SCORE racing division for high-tech, 850-horesepower unlimited production trucks. In addition to a full eight-page spread in the current SCORE Journal, issue No. 7, links to special videos produced by Telly-award winning BCII TV of SoCal, the 2015 SCORE Dirty Dozen young guns are available on the SCORE website at… http://score-international.com/presenting-the-2015-score-dirty-dozen-part-i/

 

 

Aaron Ampudia – Age 22, Class 1600, Ensenada, Mexico, No. 1636 Papas & Beer Racing Alumi Craft-VW Aaron Ampudia, is a second-generation desert racer who started going to SCORE Baja races at three years old to watch his dad, and later his brothers race. Aaron Ampudia started racing dirt bikes at four, and later transitioned to a Trophy Kart. He has spent the last two years racing as a co driver in SCORE Class 1/2-1600 where he finished second last year in season points including his first victory at the SCORE San Felipe 250. This year, Aaron Ampudia has taken the role of driver of record with great success. He won Class 1/2-1600 in both the SCORE Baja Sur 500 and the SCORE Baja 500 and finished third in the season-opening SCORE San Felipe 250 and currently has a commanding point lead in his class.

Justin Davis – Age 21, Class TT, Chino Hills, Calif., No. 85 Green Army Motorsports Chevy Silverado Davis, started racing in Class 1/2-1600 when he was just 15. He has since raced in Class 10, SCORE Lites, Class 1 and now SCORE Trophy Truck. While he has a lot of experience, Davis does not consider himself a flashy driver. “I’m not the most radical driver, I am more conservative,” says Davis. “If you don’t make it to the finish line it does not matter how fast you were. I conserve my truck for the end of the race, rather than be the fastest in the first 100 miles.” Davis won the SCORE Class 10 point crown in 2010 and the SCORE Class 1 season point title in 2011 before moving up to SCORE Trophy Truck in 2014. He also has two class wins in the SCORE Baja 1000.

Mark Samuels – Age 25, Class Pro Moto, Pioneertown, Calif., No. 5x ox Motorsports Honda CRF450X Mark Samuels got his start in Motocross when he was just three years old. He began racing seriously as a amateur in his teens and turned pro at 21. With second place finishes in the SCORE San Felipe 250 and SCORE Baja Sur 500, Samuels is off to a great start to in the 2015 season and is currently in third place in the Open Motorcycle point standings. Samuels credits lots of practice for his success this season. “My favorite part of SCORE Baja racing is the places you get to race through at the high speeds we achieve. I also like all the awesome people you get to meet while you’re down in Baja.”

Brandon Walsh – Age 28, Class 7, Encinitas, Calif., No. 701 Homemade Motorsports Toyota Tacoma Walsh began racing at 19 when he took a stock Toyota Tacoma, put in the required safety gear, and raced in Sportsman Truck at the 2005 SCORE Baja 500. He had no radio, intercom or GPS but he was determined to race anyway. Walsh has learned a lot about racing in the past few years. “I learned the hard way. I absolutely sucked for a couple years. I was very young and had an attitude,” says Walsh. “It took me awhile to learn that going slower is faster. Not trying to beat everyone in the first 100 miles is the way to go. ” Walsh is currently in third place in the Class 7 after three races in this year’s series.

Cody Reid – Age 23, Class 10, Apple Valley, Calif., No. 1068 RPI Racing Custom-Chevy Reid, whose bother Shelby is driver of record in SCORE Class 1, started his racing career at age 16 in a Class 9 car. In 2014 he won the SCORE Class 10 championship, and this year won Class 10 in the inaugural SCORE Baja Sur 500. “My driving style is to keep the car wheels down” says Reid. “I take it a turn at a time and drive what I can see. I don’t charge hard in the dust, where others do. I push myself and the car to what I feel are the limits, and hope for the best.” Reid is currently second in the 2015 SCORE Class 10 point standings.

Eduardo “Lalo” Laguna – Age 24, Class TT, Mexicali, Mexico, No. 17 RPM Racing Chevy Silverado Laguna is a soft spoken desert racer who won his first race in SCORE Trophy Truck in only his second attempt when he won the Inaugural Bud Light SCORE Baja Sur 500 in April. Laguna is driven by goals and his his hope is to claim the number one plate for the RPM Racing SCORE Trophy Truck as the season Champion. Laguna is currently fourth in SCORE Trophy Truck season points. In the other two races this year he finished seventh in San Felipe in January and 17th in Ensenada in June.

Axial partners with SCORE International – Official R/C Vehicles of SCORE

blog_official_score_2015_500x220

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
(Mission Viejo, CA) February 25, 2015.

Axial R/C Inc., A subsidiary of Hobbico Inc., is proud to announce Axial as the Official R/C Vehicles of the Baja 500, Baja 1000 and SCORE International.

So much focus in the R/C industry is placed on short course off road racing. It makes perfect sense, as it is easy to gather lots of people into a confined area to experience off road racing vehicles. What many people don’t know is that short course off road racing was born in the desert. What short course promoters are attempting to do is bring desert racing to the masses. What is lost in this process is the adventure. In true Axial style, we are all about chasing adventure. In this case, Axial R/C has partnered with SCORE International to support further growth of the off road racing that started it all.

The Baja 500 and Baja 1000 are two of the most recognizable off road racing events on the planet. The machines, the people and the experiences of these and all of SCORE’s events are the inspiration for many of today’s off road enthusiasts. Axial fans and consumers are driven by adventure, getting out there and experiencing the relationship of man and machine in the wild. Axial will be taking an in depth look at what drives all of these individuals to push themselves and their machines to the absolute limit to conquer Baja.

About Axial
Founded in 2005, Axial R/C, Inc. has quickly became a global brand leader of hobby grade radio controlled products as Axial is a company of enthusiasts for enthusiasts. We manufacture chassis and accessory products predominantly for the Rock Crawling and Overland Adventure segments, with design emphasis on rugged construction and scale realism. Axial is regularly involved in local and national events which allow us to keep our finger on the pulse of R/C culture, thus earning us awards year after year, including “Best Truck”, “Most Innovative”, “Best Engineered Product of the Year”, and “People’s Choice.” For more information on Axial and Axial products please visit www.axialracing.comtwitter.com/axialracingfacebook.com/axialincyoutube.com/axialvideos

About SCORE International
The World’s Foremost Desert Racing Organization, SCORE International was founded in 1973 by the late motorsports innovator Mickey Thompson and continues today under the ownership and director of former SCORE Trophy Truck racing champion Roger Norman. The five-race, internationally-televised SCORE World Desert Championship features 35 Pro and six Sportsman classes for cars, trucks, UTVs, motorcycles and quads. The series is televised nationally on the CBS Sports Network with international syndication for each of the one-hour programs. The flagship event of the SCORE World Desert Championship is the iconic SCORE Baja 1000, the granddaddy of all desert races. The 2015 SCORE Baja 1000 will air as a two-hour special on the CBS Sports Network. For more information regarding SCORE International, visit www.score-international.com