AX90046 SCX10 II Jeep Cherokee Kit Build Series – Part 6

AX90046SCX10II_JeepCherokeeKit_Build_Series_Part6

Assembling the Wild Boar Driveshafts is a fairly simple task and should only take you a few minutes to complete. There are however a few tips we’re going to throw in to make sure the parts work well for those long treks on the trail. Ready, set, build!

TOOLS NEEDED
2mm Hex Driver
Side cutters
Supplied grease and threadlock also required

STEP 1
Axial SCX WB Driveshafts 1
Start by cutting the driveshaft parts from the parts trees. The trees have various size driveshaft parts on them so reference the manual to see exactly which parts you need.

STEP 2
Axial SCX WB Driveshafts 2
Here we start to assemble the driveshafts and it is extremely important to add thread lock to the screws before inserting them into the driveshaft and screwing it into the universal mounting boss.

STEP 3
Axial SCX WB Driveshafts 3
After the end is screwed into the driveshaft, place a small dab of grease on the hex driver and use it to coat the inside of the driveshaft end.

STEP 4
Axial SCX WB Driveshafts 4
With the ends greased, you can slip the universal barrels into the ends.

STEP 5
Axial SCX WB Driveshafts 5
Slip the drive cup over the end and line-up the cross-pin holes. Once the holes are lined up, you can insert the pins.

STEP 6
Axial SCX WB Driveshafts 6
To secure the pins in place, you’ll simply need to slide the plastic sleeve over the cups. Set-screws will hold these in place later.

STEP 7
Axial SCX WB Driveshafts 7
Assemble the rest of the driveshaft by inserting the appropriate slider into the Wild Boar shafts.

STEP 8
Axial SCX WB Driveshafts 8
Now the shafts are attached to the transmission output shafts. Here you’ll use the set-screw pins to secure the drive cups to the output shaft. You may use a dab of threadlock on the set-screws for extra security. Note, if the holes for the drive cup do not line up with the shaft, you may have installed the shaft incorrectly, go back and rebuild the gearcase if necessary.

STEP 9
Axial SCX WB Driveshafts 9
The skidplate is up next for installation. This is simple, secure it to the transmission case with the two provided flathead allen screws.

STEP 10
Axial SCX WB Driveshafts 10
The transmission mounts are installed next. Pay close attention to the direction in which they are installed. Snug the two buttonhead screws that secure the mounts.

FINISHED
Axial SCX WB Driveshafts 11
With several sections of the manual complete, the next steps will really start turning parts into an actual rig. Make sure you check back for the next part of our kit build!

AX90046 SCX10 II Jeep Cherokee Kit Build Series – Part 4

AX90046SCX10II_JeepCherokeeKit_Build_Series_Part4
We’re moving into a tricky area of our SCX10 II Build, the shocks. The AX90046  comes with the licensed Icon Vehicle Dynamics aluminum body oil filled coil-over shocks (AX30103) which are the preferred shocks for serious off-roaders. The shocks go together nice and smooth and offer excellent performance on the trail. Of course we do have a few tips to pass along to help you with building them so let’s get right into it.

GET READY
Axial SCX Icon Shocks 1
Like we’ve suggested in previous posts, it’s a great idea to get all the parts together that you’ll need to build this part of the kit. For tools you’ll need a pair of side-cutters, long nose pliers and we suggest TLR shock shaft pliers to hold the shafts. You can find TLR pliers HERE.

STEP 1
Axial SCX Icon Shocks 2
First up, we need to install the spring pre-load nut on the shocks. Using side-cutters, cut the nut off the tree and screw it onto the shock with the flange side facing the logos. Screw the nut on several threads so the shock caps can be installed later.

STEP 2
Axial SCX Icon Shocks 3
Oh, this is a fun job! Installing the e-clips on the shock shafts, watch out, they could go flying if you are not careful! With your needle nose pliers, snap the e-clip into the lower slot on the top of the shock shaft. Then slide your piston over the shaft and secure the top with another e-clip. Take your time here so you don’t lose any clips or damage the piston with the pliers.

STEP 4
Axial SCX Icon Shocks 4
Here is a tip you may not know. Before installing the o-rings in the shock, place them in a plastic bag from the kit followed by a few drops of shock oil and make sure they’re coated. This helps the shock feel smoother when completed.

STEP 5
Axial SCX Icon Shocks 5
Why are we showing you the shock o-ring spacers in a stand-alone photo? It is critical to cut the spacers from the tree without any extra plastic flashing. Extra plastic here could cause unwanted friction in the shock.

STEP 6
Axial SCX Icon Shocks 6
It’s time to install the shock seals into the bodies. Slip one o-ring into the base of the shocks, followed by the plastic spacer, then another o-ring followed by the lower shock cap. Tighten the lower cap firmly. After the seals are assembled, place a dot of oil on the shock shaft threads and slips the shafts into the shock bodies.

STEP 7
Axial SCX Icon Shocks 7
The lower shock ends need to be screwed onto the shock shafts. Do not use knurled pliers to hold the shaft, this could damage the shaft which will tear the o-ring seals. We suggest using shock shaft pliers to hold the shafts while installing the ends. Then pop the pivot balls into the shock ends.

STEP 8
Axial SCX Icon Shocks 8
You’ll need to prep the top shock cap before you fill your shocks with oil. These Icon replica shocks come with faux reservoirs for scale style. You’ll need to place the Icon logo on the reservoirs and then screw them to the shock caps. You’ll also need to slip an o-ring seal into the top of the cap. Watch, the o-ring may fall out. If this happens, placing a drop of oil in the cap can help keep it in place.

STEP 9
Axial SCX Icon Shocks 10
Fill the shock bodies with oil. After you fill the shock with oil almost to the top, take the shock shaft and slowly cycle it up and down. This will release any unwanted air.

STEP 10
Axial SCX Icon Shocks 11
Before screwing on the shock cap, push the shock shaft almost all the way up to the top.

STEP 11
Axial SCX Icon Shocks 12
With the shock shaft at the top, screw the shock cap onto the body and wipe off any excess oil with a paper tower. When the shock is assembled, the shock shaft should be able to be pushed all the way up to the top. If you have a large gap of shock shaft showing, you will have to bleed out excess oil. To do so, loosen the cap a few turns and push the shaft up. Oil should bleed out. Once a little oil bleeds out, retighten the cap and try it again. Keep bleeding the shock until the shaft reaches the top.

STEP 12
Axial SCX Icon Shocks 13
We’re getting close to wrapping up these shocks! Slide the springs over the shock bodies and slip on the shock perch. Snap an additional pivot ball into the shock caps.

FINISHED
Axial SCX Icon Shocks 14
Here’s how your shocks should look once completed. Note that there are front and rear springs so place them on the vehicle later accordingly.

Customize Your AR44’s In Minutes

Customize_AR44
One of the best parts to owning an Axial SCX10 II is your ability to customize it to make it your own. There are plenty of performance and accessory parts to choose from and in this blog we’re going to show you how to customize your SCX10 II’s AR44 axles. This accessory swap should only take you minutes to perform and cost you under $10 for each axle. Here’s what you need to know.

PARTS NEEDED
Axial Black Axle Options 2
AR44 Black Differential Cover and Link Mounts- AX31437 (Quantity Needed: 2)

TOOLS NEEDED
Axial Black Axle Options 1
2mm Hex Driver

STEP 1
Axial Black Axle Options 3
Swapping out the differential cover is simple and can even be done while the axle is on the truck if you have a ball head 2mm hex driver. You’ll want to locate the four diff cover screw heads on the pinion out-put side of the axle and unscrew all four.

STEP 2
Axial Black Axle Options 4
After removing the four cover screws, pull the differential cover off, it’s in there pretty tight, so use some force to pull it from the axle housing.

STEP 3
Axial Black Axle Options 5
Break or cut the new black diff cover off of the parts tree in slip it into the axle. Make sure the indent on the cover faces the bevel gear side of the axle. Screw the four retaining screws back in and tighten them snug. This is how the axle looks with a black cover and red link mounts, a cool custom option.

STEP 4
Axial Black Axle Options 6
Want to swap the link mounts out too? First you’ll need to remove the suspension links and shocks from the mount. Then unscrew the mounts from the axle as shown above.

STEP 5
Axial Black Axle Options 7
Once you’ve installed the red mounts, break the black mounts from the parts tree and install them on the axle the where the red mounts were, paying close attention to how the mount is positioned. The link mount with extra support faces the bottom. This is how an all-black AR44 Axle looks.

FINISHED
Axial Black Axle Options 8
If you removed your axles from your rig, now is the time to reinstall them. Above is another option we wanted to show you. This axle is set up with black link mounts and a red diff cover. Build your axle the way you want it for a custom look!

How To: Install the AXI31555 Blazer Hard Top

How To: Install the AX31555 Blazer Hard Top Axial’s AX90058 SCX10 II 1969 Chevrolet Blazer is certainly one good-looking ride, but the addition of the AXI31555 Hard Top is sure to catch the attention of many Blazer fans. In this article, we show you a step-by-step procedure on how to mount this cap. But, before we do, let’s go over some of the tools you’ll need to get the job done.

TOOLS NEEDED:
1. 1.5mm Hex Wrench
2. Scissors (specialty scissors for cutting polycarbonate plastic)
3. Reamer (for drilling holes)
4. Paint (for polycarbonate bodies)

LIST OF PARTS USED:
AX90058 Axial SCX10 II 1969 Chevrolet Blazer RTR
AXI31555 Axial Blazer Hard Top

STEP 1

How To: Install the AX31555 Blazer Hard Top Before we build, let’s look at what comes in the AXI31555 Blazer Hard Top package. There’s the polycarbonate plastic shell, instruction sheet, window masks, sticker sheet and hardware bags. Easy enough, right?

STEP 2

How To: Install the AX31555 Blazer Hard Top A closer look at the instruction sheet. It also documents the opening rear window, a cool feature but more needed to get to the body clips!

STEP 3

How To: Install the AX31555 Blazer Hard Top Window masks. I peeled off the excess to make it easier to see the actual window parts. Note the top and bottom are for the side windows, the center is for the rear window.

STEP 4

How To: Install the AX31555 Blazer Hard Top Before you stick the window masks on, make sure you wash the Hard Top with soap and water. Dry it completely – you may even want to let it sit out for a little bit to air dry, just to be sure. Peel off the masks and stick them on. They don’t have to be perfect as we’ve included external decals, but you want to get them as close as possible.

STEP 5

How To: Install the AX31555 Blazer Hard Top Paint whatever color you want; I did black since I figured it would match the Blazer body well.

STEP 6

How To: Install the AX31555 Blazer Hard Top After the Hard Top is done drying, cut it out, remove the window masks and the overspray film. Now, as an added detail, sprayed the outside of the Hard Top with a matte clear coat to soften up the shine. If you want to replicate this, DO NOT remove the overspray film. First, use a sharp blade (Xacto brand, Olfa, etc) and cut out around the windows, then remove the overspray film. If you don’t cut out the windows, you’ll clear coat them as well and you won’t be able to see through them.

STEP 7

How To: Install the AX31555 Blazer Hard Top Using the hardware enclosed, attach the mounts to the Hard Top. Note that there are two different designs of mounts; you don’t want to mix these up when you install them. Read the instructions carefully.

STEP 8

How To: Install the AX31555 Blazer Hard Top Assemble the swiveling tailgate mount…

STEP 9

How To: Install the AX31555 Blazer Hard Top …and attach it to the tailgate. You’ll need to notch the tailgate first; there are scribe marks to show you where to cut.

STEP 10

How To: Install the AX31555 Blazer Hard Top Attach the tailgate assembly to the Hard Top.

STEP 11

How To: Install the AX31555 Blazer Hard Top The tailgate should swing freely. If not, you may need to trim the notches until it does.

STEP 12

How To: Install the AX31555 Blazer Hard Top Here’s a quick inside look at the tailgate mounted to the Hard Top. You can also, at this time, attach the tailgate lift handle.

STEP 13

How To: Install the AX31555 Blazer Hard Top Ream 4 small holes into the Blazer body; there are already dimples in place. Note that you only need to ream the front- and rear-most holes as shown.

STEP 14

How To: Install the AX31555 Blazer Hard Top Set the Hard Top in place and attach with the supplied hardware. Set your completed Blazer down, step back and revel in your masterpiece!

Tips For Spray Painting Bodies

Tips4Painting_Lexan_Bodies
A task simple for some can be daunting for others. Spray painting an RC bodies is one of those tasks. For those who have not painted a body before, you’ve found the right blog to read. We’re going to show you just how to paint your first body successfully. These are simple tips and tricks that will allow you to paint your body so when you’re finished, it looks like it came from the factory. Let’s get started.

Axial Spray Paint1
We’re going to paint these RR10 Bomber panels for an upcoming project so they will be the demo pieces for this blog. Before you get started, here are a few things you’ll need to have on hand to get the job done. First, you’ll need spray paint of course. Make certain it is a polycarbonate compatible spray paint. This type of paint will adhere itself to the Lexan. Other paints may not adhere and flake off as soon as you roll your rig over. You’ll also need some dish soap, paper towels, masking tape and some warm water.

STEP 1
Axial Spray Paint2
The first step is to wash your body or panels. When the body is molded at the factory, sometimes oils from the molds or even someone’s hands can get on the body. Using the dish soap, a paper towel and some warm water, wash the body well and rinse out all of the soap.

STEP 2
Axial Spray Paint3
Now use some more towels to dry the body. Do not leave any water on the body. Get into all the creases with the towel to get the water out or it will deflect the paint leaving fish-eye like marks.

STEP 3
Axial Spray Paint7
We’re getting close to spraying the paint. Before you do so, you’ll want to shake the can of paint for a few minutes to mix the contents as you would do with any can of paint. Now here’s an additional trick some painters don’t share. Run warm water over the can to help warm the contents. This will help pressurize the can and make the spray come out in a fine pattern to better coat the body.

TIP
Axial Spray Paint4
Another tip we have is to hold the body about 8-10 inches from the spray can. Spray too close and you can get drips or uneven spray patterns. Spraying farther away will help coat the body evenly.

STEP 4
Axial Spray Paint5
Now it’s time for your first coat. In one direction, either horizontally of vertically spray the body. Don’t spray the body directly. Start spraying and move the can across the body and stop spraying when the can has past the body. If you hold the can directly at the body and spray, you can’t just blobbing the paint in one spot. Now for the next pass, shift the can and repeat the process until the body has a very light first coat of paint. Set the body aside and let it dry; fifteen to twenty minutes is a good drying time.

STEP 5
Axial Spray Paint6
Time for the second coat. Basically repeat the steps above. Warm the can, note your spacing, start your spray before the body and stop after you’ve passed over the body. Hold the body up to some light to see how the coverage is. Here our second coat covered well on the right side, we’re going to make one or two more passes on the left side to even up the coverage and then set it aside to dry.

STEP 6
Axial Spray Paint8
Here is the interior of our bomber after the third coat. We still have some clear spots to fill in. To do this, we’ll get just a little closer with the can to get the paint into the hard to reach areas. If you are spraying flat panels, keep your distance and spray over the light areas.

TIP
Axial Spray Paint9
Some panels can be difficult to hold. Using some tape, stick it to the panel and make a small fold in the center to hold onto.

TIP
Axial Spray Paint Tip
Be aware that some colors may need to be backed by another color. Fluorescent colors typically need to be backed with white. Candy colors can be backed with white, silver, gold and sometimes even black. If your solid color still seems transparent, consider backing it with white or even a silver. Keep in mind that whatever color you use to back your paint may alter the main color. So if you spray black behind red, it may turn the red dark. It may be better to back red with a silver as if the red is too transparent, a white might make it look pink. Here’ we’re backing this white panel with silver to give it a more opaque look.

FINISHED
Axial Spray Paint10
There we have it, a perfectly painted interior for our Bomber. Don’t forget to pull the overspray film off of the Lexan before applying decals. The interior is now ready to be installed. We hope this simple spray painting tutorial helps you spray paint your first body shell. Make sure to check back often on the Axial Blog as we’ll get into more complex paint jobs in the future.

 

 

Tips To Assemble Beadlock Wheels

Tips_Assemble_Beadlock_Wheels
Who loves assembling tires? Raise your hand! Stop raising your hand, we can’t see you. Glueing or assembling tires on beadlock rims is not among the favorite build tasks of an RC machine. Perhaps that is why most RC manual writers leave it to the end. But it’s a job that needs to get done. However if it’s not done right, it could lead to problems when you’re out at play or on the course. Here we’re going to go over how to assemble a certain wheel type so it secures the tire properly and that is a beadlock rim. Beadlock rims have some great advantages, they secure the tire without glue and the wheel can even be reused when you want to swap tires. But if you assemble a beadlock incorrectly, your tire may seem out of alignment and cause wheel wobble and erratic handling. Let’s go over some tips to help you install a tire on a beadlock wheel properly.

GATHER YOUR PARTS
Axial Beadlocks 1
Gather all the parts you need to assemble one wheel and put them together in a pile. Here is the loosely assembled wheel, tire with insert, screws and inner hub.

TOOLS
Axial Beadlocks 2
The tools you’ll need will be pretty simple. Pretty much you’ll just need a 2mm hex driver for this wheel. We’re going to make our lives easier and use and electric driver with 2mm speed bit. You may also need a leather punch depending on how you want to vent your tire.

STEP 1
Axial Beadlocks 3
These 2.2 Walker Evans Wheels came loosely assembled from the factory. It is important to notice how they come apart. They have a vent option built into the wheel that allows you to have no vent, a 2 hole vent (1 on each side) or a 4 hole vent or even a 6 hole vent. This vent system is off-set so you’ll want to notice the position of the middle ring. To make keeping track of the rim easier, we put the wheel from the factory on the table, backside of the rim first. Then slide out the center hoop and place the back side down next to the rear locking ring. Then we take the face of the rim out and placed it next to the center ring.

STEP 2
Axial Beadlocks 4
Take the center ring and slip it into the tire makeing sure it also goes inside of the foam insert. As you slip the insert in, the “back” of the rim will continue to face down.

STEP 3
Axial Beadlocks 5
Check to make sure your inner ring is perfectly positioned in the center of the foam.

STEP 4
Axial Beadlocks 6
Now pick the tire up, move it over the back side of the beadlock ring and place the tire down. You can flip the tire over now so you can push the outer rim onto the tire. We know the additional steps to keep track of the inner ring off-set sound silly, but trust us, its better to go slow and keep track rather than getting frustrated wondering why your wheel isn’t going together properly.

STEP 5
Axial Beadlocks 7
Look inside the wheel, see the notches? This is the venting system. By moving the outter rim so it inserts over the peg in a different location adjusts how much the tire will vent. We have it in the middle so only one hole on this side of the wheel will vent air. Want a softer tire, allow 2 holes to vent. Want to go in the water, shift the wheel ring so none of the holes are open. You get the idea.

STEP 6
Axial Beadlocks 8
Now take the time to set the tire bead onto the shiny portion of the rim ring, we pulled the tire off of it, so you can see it better. If its on the next lower part of the ring, it may not press on properly later. After slowly pushing in the outter ring, lift up on the tire edge a bit to make sure its seated properly.

STEP 7
Axial Beadlocks 9
Now you can flip the tire back over and place it on your bench. Slip in the front portion of the rim from the top. Push down on the rim face so the tire bead seats itself just like you did to the back ring.

STEP 8
Axial Beadlocks 10
With the rim face in place, flip the tire over again and make sure the screw holes line up. If they do not, spin the front rim face until the holes line up. Do no turn the back ring, this will change your vents.

STEP 9
Axial Beadlocks 11
Time to start assembling this thing! Screw two screws into the rim on opposite sides. Only screw them in a few threads.

STEP 10
Axial Beadlocks 12
Now install two more, again across from each other and just a few threads.

STEP 11
Axial Beadlocks 13
Thread the last few screws into the wheel, again just screw them in so a few threads catch. Your wheel should now be aligned and ready to be tightened. But wait!

STEP 12
Axial Beadlocks 14x
You will need to keep the wheel face and back ring even as you tigthen down the screws. This is achieved by tightening the screws a little at a time in a “star pattern” just as if you were tightening the lug-nuts on a real car. You may tighten the screws down in the star pattern for 4-5 cycles before the wheel has compressed and properly pinched the tire in the beadlock. Tigthen the screws until they are snug and you don’t see any gaps between the rim pieces or screws.

STEP 13
Axial Beadlocks 15
Install your inner hex hub in a similar fashion. You can install all the screws at once, but tighten them into their final position by using the star pattern.

STEP 14
Axial Beadlocks 16
Check your tire overhang. Lift up on the edge of the tire and you should see the rubber overhang edge that sits on the outter edge of the rim. It should look uniform as you turn the wheel and gently pull up on the edge. If you see a large gap or can’t pull the edge out at all, there’s a chance your  tire is not properly seated in the rim and you’ll need to disassemble the wheel and repeat the install process. If you don’t the tire will wobble. A wobbly tire can cause bad handling and wear other parts on the rig prematurely.

TIPS
Axial Beadlocks 18
Some drivers choose to vent through the tire. To do this, you’ll need a leather punch to punch a hole in the tire. The thought behind venting the tire is that any dirt that gets inside can “fling” out. Or if water gets in the tire, it can drain out. Some think less dirt gets into the tire with this style of vent. It’s an option we just want to let you know about and you can decide what style is best for you.

Axial Beadlocks 19
Foam Trimming- There are a number of methods to trimming tire insert foam that will change how the tire acts. Some will cut the outer edges of the foam on a diagonal so the sidewall of the tire will feel a bit softer. If you are just having fun, leave it as is. If you plan to race, see how other racers modify their inserts.

FINISHED!
Axial Beadlocks 17
Your beadlock wheel and tire are now properly assembled. Just three more to go! Or if you have a Bomber, just four more to go! Take your time and assembled your wheels properly. They’ll stay together and allow your rig to perform better.

Build The Perfect King Shocks

Building_ThePerfect_King_Shocks

When it comes to building shocks on an RC kit, many builders start to cringe. It’s not a favorite task for many, however building your shocks properly is a must if you want your suspension to perform. We’re working on a RR10 Bomber for some future video action shoots and decided to take some extra time to take photos to show you just how to build the King aluminum shocks that come with the kit. Here we’ll show you all of our tips and tricks that will result in a high performance shock that will give your rig the best handling possible.

YOU’LL NEED
Shock Shaft Pliers (TLR99101)
5.0 Nut Driver (Set: DYNT2010)
Shock O-Ring Grease (TLR77002)
Competition Silicone Shock Oil (TLR74020)
Paper Towels

STEP 1
Axial King Shocks 1
It’s best to take the time and lay out all of your shock components nice and neatly so you have everything in front of you and nothing is left out.

STEP 2
Axial King Shocks 2
We’re going to start with the cartirdge assembly. Carefully cut them from the parts trees and slip the clear o-ring over the threads and seat it in the lower slot.

STEP 3
Axial King Shocks 3
Don’t jump right into installing the shock o-rings in the cartridge. Before you do so, here’s a tip. Use a shock o-ring grease such as TLR77002  to grease the o-rings. Place a small amount of grease in a plastic bag and then the o-rings. Work the grease onto the o-rings so they’re well coated.

STEP 4
Axial King Shocks 4
You’ll also need the cartidge spacers and caps to finish the cartridge assembly. It’s best to cut the parts off of the tree using a hobby knife. Cut as close as you can to the spacers so there isn’t any extra material from the tree on the spacer. Extra material here could cause a binding in the cartridge.

STEP 5
Axial King Shocks 5
Place a greased o-ring in the cartridge, followed by the spacer, followed by another o-ring.

STEP 6
Axial King Shocks 6
Snap the cartridge cap on and make certian it is perfectly seated in place. If the cap isn’t completely snapped on, it could possible come apart during use.

STEP 7
Axial King Shocks 7
Now it’s time to install the pistons on the  shock shafts. In your RR10 kit, there will be delrin pistons in the bag. Use these. Place one washer on the shock shaft, followed by the piston, followed by another washer and then the retaining nut. Use shock shaft pleirs to hold the shaft and use the 5.0 nut driver to snug the nut into place.

STEP 8
Axial King Shocks 8
Once you’ve tightened the nut, make certain the piston just barely spins on the shaft. If you tighten it too much to the point it can’t move, you may have possibly “mushroomed” the piston and it could possibly bind in the shock body.

STEP 9
King SHock
Slip the assembled shock shaft/ piston into the cartridge and thread it into the bottom of the shock body slowly. You’ll want to completely screw the cartridge in slowly until the o-ring can no longer be seen and the cartridge is tight.

STEP 10
Axial King Shocks 9
Slide the bump-stop on the shaft and screw the shock end onto the shaft until the top of the end meets the unthreaded portion of the shaft. Using shock shaft pliers here is a good idea.

STEP 11
Axial King Shocks 11
Time to install the pre-load collars, but first you need to slip the black o-rings into the slots inside the collars.

STEP 12
Axial King Shocks 12
When threading the collars onto the shock body, it’s a good idea to put a drop of oil at the top of the threads. This will allow the collars to screw on much easier.

STEP 13
Axial King Shocks 13
We’re getting there. It’s now time to fill the shock with oil. Instead of using the kit oil, we’re going to use a competition grade oil from Team Losi Racing to fill the shock. With the piston at the bottom of the body, fill the shock body with oil to the top.

STEP 14
Axial King Shocks 14
Axial King Shocks 15
This is a critical step. We have to cycle out any air trapped under the piston. Slowly push the shock shaft up in the body. Don’t let the piston go past the oil at the top. When the piston nears the top, pull the shock shaft back down and air bubbles should rise to the top. Continue this process until all of the trapped air is gone. If there are fine bubbles in the oil, set the shock aside and wait for the air bubble to come to the surface.

STEP 15
Axial King Shocks 16
Seat the shock bladder into the cap. Slip the bladder in and using a fine blade screwdriver or similar object, make sure the bladder is seated perfectly in the top of the cap by pushing on the edges.

STEP 16
Axial King Shocks 18
Top off the shock with oil if necessary. The oil should be near level with the top of the body.

STEP 17
Axial King Shocks 20
Slowly push the shock shaft to the top.

STEP 18
Axial King Shocks 21
Now screw the shock cap on. Some oil should seep out of the sides. Tighten the cap firmly.

STEP 19
Axial King Shocks 22
Once the cap is tightented, the shaft should slide out a little bit. Cycle the shock shaft in and out several times to make sure it has a good feel and there isn’t any binding.

STEP 20
Axial King Shocks 23
If the shock is built correctly, you should be able to push the shock shaft all the way to the top. If there is a lot of shock shaft showing, you have what’s called hydro-lock and this will cause handling problems. You may need to bleed some additional oil out of the shock. Loosen the cap, push the shock shaft in all the way and tighten the cap again. This should bleed out some oil. Repeat the process until the shaft goes all the way up.

STEP 21
Axial King Shocks 25
Almost done, slip the appropriate spring over the shock body and slip the lower shock perch into place. Pop the ball end into the shock eyelets and you’re shock is assembled!

FINISHED
Axial King Shocks 24
Your shocks should now be assembled and ready for installation on your rig. You’re not done yet. You’ll still need to adjust your pre-load collars to set your vehicles ride height. Use the suggested collar settings in the manual as a starting point. Because the weight of the equipment used in a rig may vary, small adjustments may need to be made to set your vehicle to a ride height that will work for you.

 

How To: Low Cost Blazer Tail Lights

Simple_Blazer_Tail_Light_Install
The AX90058 SCX10 II 1969 Chevrolet Blazer has become an instant hit since it’s release and drivers all over are already taking it out to explore new trails and others are already customizing it with incredible scale detail. A few of the features that many Blazer owners like is the included front LED lights and included AE-5L speed control to power the lights. If you haven’t noticed already, there is an open pigtail on the speed control that will allow you to install an additional set of LED lights. We’re going to show you how to take advantage of that open LED port by installing tail lights on your Blazer. All you’ll need are the light pods included with the kit, some hardware you may already have and a light string you can pick up at your local hobby shop or favorite online retailer.

Axial Blazer Tail Lights 1
You remember that bag of extras that came with your kit? Time to dig it out from under your workbench. Inside you’ll find some parts trees with light buckets and lenses. There are a number of light buckets included, but we’re going to use the small round buckets found on the tree shown above.

Axial Blazer Tail Lights 3
To add LED lights you’ll need to pick up a pack of AX31481 lights that will look similar to the lights above. You’ll also need just a few screws to complete the install. Two 3x6mm button head machine screws (AXA0113) and two 2x6mm cap head machine screws (AXA013.)

STEP 1
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 4 Axial Blazer Tail Lights 5
We’re going to install the tail lights in the rear bumper. The first step is to test fit the lights so you know exactly where they are going. The two photos above show where the light buckets will be located on our Blazer.

STEP 2
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 6
Using a marker, make a mark on the bumper where the indexing pin on the light bucket will go in the bumper.

STEP 3
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 7
Now drill a small hole where you made your reference mark. We actually found that rotating a hobby knife around like a drill will make a nice small hole just right for the bucket pin.

STEP 4
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 8
Now place the light bucket back into place on the bumper, the index pin should go right into the bumper. Make sure the bucket is square in the bumper and then use your marker to make a mark around the mounting boss of the bucket. This will give you an idea of where you need to drill the mounting hole.

STEP 5
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 9
Drill a 3.5mm hole using your marks as a guide. When you’re done, your hole pattern should look like this.

STEP 6
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 11
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 10
Time to assemble your light buckets. Slide the LED light in the bucket, followed by the LED clip over the back of the light and use the 2x6mm screw to secure the clip to the bucket.

STEP 7
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 12
Next press the lenses into the light buckets. TIP 1: Paint the lens red from the backside to give it more of a tail light look. TIP 2: Before pressing the lens into the bucket, use some clear model glue to help secure the lens.

STEP 8
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 13
Here is the tricky part, screwing the light bucket to the bumper using the 3x6mm screw. To do this, we cheated and made an additional hole in the bumper bracket that allowed us to slip a long 2mm ball-end hex driver through the bumper to get to the screw. Screw your light pods to the bumper.

STEP 9
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 14
Things get simpler here. Plug your LED light string into the open port of the AE-5L speed control.

STEP 10
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 15
Use some zip-ties to secure the LED light wires to the chassis cross members.

FINISHED
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 17 Axial Blazer Tail Lights 16
In about 10-15 minutes of time at your workbench, you should have working taillights. Head out to the trails and enjoy the new look of your Blazer on your Axial Adventures.
Axial Blazer Tail Lights 18

Axialfest 2018 Concours

Each and every year, some of the best RC builders converge at Axialfest to put their work on display for Axial fans to see and judges to notice in the Concours event. Year after year, more and more spectacular builds line the miniature walls of the Cisco Grove pavilion while bystanders look on as judges stroll pass the presented vehicles looking for machines that really stand out from the rest. Like previous years, the vehicles on display were all amazing displays of passion for the hobby and representation of some skilled detailers. Two new kids classes were introduced into the mix and were supported with some creative builds for their age brackets. All of those who put their custom built Axial based machines into concours deserve recognition for a job well done, but in the end only three were pulled for awards in each class. Check out some concourse scenes from Axialfest 2018 and the top three machines for each category.

Axialfest 2018 Concours12 Axialfest 2018 Concours1 Axialfest 2018 Concours2 Axialfest 2018 Concours3 Axialfest 2018 Concours4 Axialfest 2018 Concours7 Axialfest 2018 Concours5

CONCOURSE TOP 3′s
Axialfest 2018 Concours13
Daily driver
1. Alec Va DenBrink – Liberty
2. Joe Zuniga – Hilux
3. Elio Dianda – Brute

Axialfest 2018 Concours18
D’raisin
1. Corey Hall – Goat
2. Todd Norton – Military 6×6
3. Bree Eral – Beetle

Axialfest 2018 Concours6
Monster truck
1. Paul Russel Jr – White/Blue MT
2. Ben Thomas – Black Truck
3. Cancer sucks – Kye Steiner

Axialfest 2018 Concours17
Trailer
1. Daniel Flores – Jeep Trailer
2. James Tomlinson – Forerunner
3. Judd Rummage – Amain Bike trailer

Axialfest 2018 Concours14
12 and under
1. Ina Eral – Unicorn
2. Sadie Silva – Dinosaur Wraith
3. Joe Zuniga – Blue Jeep

Axialfest 2018 Concours11
13-18
1. Jacob Simpson – 6×6 Flatbed
2. Dominic Reyes – Green Flatbed
3. Jensen LeBlanc – F350 SD

Axialfest 2018 Concours10
Best Theme
1. Bree Eral – Dragon 6×6
2. Devlin Shipley – Scooby Buggy:
3. Chris Harder – Radioactive FC

Axialfest 2018 Concours15
Adventurist
1. Ty Campbell – Dakar Truck
2. Matt Hauck – Wrangler/ Powerwagon
3. Chris Prestwood – SBC Power Wagon

Axialfest 2018 Concours9
Bomber
1. Jay Jaffe – Silver Otterpops
2. Mike Thompson – Red Altra
3. Dean Farrington – Black/ Orange

Best Of Show
After the Judges had determined the Top 3 finishers for each class, the owners of the trucks were asked to come together and vote on a best of show. Sure each builder felt their rig was the best, but it was only a short time for them all to come together and agree who was best in show overall. In the end, Todd Norton with his Kraz 255 Converted Ukrainian Military clearly stood out from the rest from it’s detailed body, perfectly scale wood log haul and it’s patina for days.
Axialfest 2018 Concours16

Congratulations for all those who took home awards and thank you to all those who entered. Yet again another Axialfest Concourse event has wrapped up and builders continue to amaze with builds that show off passion for Axial adventure vehicles and beyond. We can’t wait to see what everyone comes up with for AXIALFEST 2019!

Axial SCX10 II 1969 Chevrolet Blazer Video Collection

It’s that time again where we gather up some of the most viewed videos of Axial’s newest release. This time it’s the AX90058 SCX10 II 1969 Chevrolet Blazer. The following (in no particular order) represents some of the most viewed videos on the Blazer at the time of posting. Some are action videos, some unboxing and some include reviews of the truck. If you have or are interested in the AX90058 SCX10 II 1969 Chevrolet Blazer, then this is your go to spot to get information and impression of this exciting scale off-road ready to run rig.


By: axialvideos
Title: Axial AX90058 SCX10 II 1969 Chevrolet Blazer 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – RTR
Description: Classic looks. Open-air top. Aggressive stance. These are just some of the characteristics that describe the gorgeous Axial AX90058 SCX10 II 1969 Chevrolet Blazer, a rig that’s as comfortable climbing to the top of a mountain as it is cruising on the beach.

But this Blazer sports more than just a macho look. Additional items like chrome-coated grille, mirrors and door handles are included. Officially licensed Chassis Unlimited front and rear tube bumpers are mounted tight to the body for maximum clearance and a set of off-road light (with LEDs) shine some light when the action goes dark.

To keep the Axial Racing SCX10 II 1969 Chevrolet Blazer rolling along in even the toughest situations, we’ve mounted it on our rugged SCX10™ II chassis. High-clearance AR44 high-pinion axles, a chassis mounted servo (CMS), re-designed AX10™ transmission case and tough steel suspension links are just a few of the parts that make the Blazer 4WD, ready to run, RC scale truck a beast on any terrain.


By: Harley Designs
Title: Axial K5 Blazer SCX10-2 Review
Description: The Axial 1969 Chevrolet K5 Blazer is hitting the shelves and I’m excited to get my hands on one early. This truck is bigger than the normal SCX10-2 that we have seen lately, its much closer to the size of first SCX10-2 Cherokee body and also includes the hard molded grill, but this time in chrome! Check it out as we go deep into the details and differences of this truck vs any of the other available models!


By:Scale Builder’s Guild
Title: Axial 1969 Blazer Unbox and Q&A!
Description: (Video Recorded From Live Broadcast) I take a live look at the new Blazer bodied RTR offering from Axial, and answer your questions.


By: RCDriver_Online
Title: Tackle The Toughest Trails! – Axial Racing AX90058 SCX10 II Chevrolet Blazer Review
Description: For some time now, there has been a rumor of a Chevrolet Blazer body in the works from the crew at Axial Racing. People have been eagerly awaiting to hear if the rumor is true. Well the time has come and it’s true, Axial has released their new Blazer body on their SCX10 II and this factory painted blue machine has lots of scale enthusiasts pumped for new builds. We managed to grab one of these new machines and give it our standard unboxing, feature breakdown, action segment and performance breakdown. Have you been waiting for a exciting new Axial scale RC trail truck? This just might be the rig you’ve been waiting for.


By: ferndogg310
Title: BLUE JUSTICE!! 69 CHEVROLET BLAZER SCX10-2- Ferndogg310
Description: Before I head out to Axialfest 2018, I had the opportunity to test drive the 1969 Chevrolet Blazer by Axial Racing before its release. This may be my current favorite [SCX10-2] RTR from AXIAL. [#AX90058]


By: axialvideos
Title: Axial SCX10 II 1969 Chevrolet Blazer Through The Woods & Water Crawl
Description: The Axial AX90058 SCX10 II 1969 Chevrolet Blazer has recently been announced and we showed you a rig that’s as comfortable climbing to the top of a mountain as it is cruising on the beach in its product launch video. Now we show you how it looks taking on another tough side of nature navigating through wooded trails and trudging through creeks.

The Axial AX90058 SCX10 II 1969 Chevrolet Blazer comes ready to run with chrome-coated grille, mirrors and door handles are included. Officially licensed Chassis Unlimited front and rear tube bumpers are mounted tight to the body for maximum clearance and a set of off-road light (with LEDs) shine some light when the action goes dark. To keep the Axial Racing SCX10 II 1969 Chevrolet Blazer rolling along in even the toughest situations, it’s mounted it on the rugged SCX10™ II chassis. High-clearance AR44 high-pinion axles, a chassis mounted servo (CMS), re-designed AX10™ transmission case and tough steel suspension links are just a few of the parts that make the Blazer 4WD, ready to run, RC scale truck a beast on any terrain.