Axialfest 2018 – Get Ready


Since July 2017, Axial drivers across the globe have been waiting for a certain announcement; the dates for Axialfest 2018. Those dates have been released and officially Axialfest 2018 will be held July 18-21st; so hit those calendar apps and save those dates.


If you’ve never been to Axialfest, then there’s no better time than now to save the date, start making plans and get excited for the RC adventure that so many have already experienced and love. To get you going, here are a few great articles and videos to help you prepare and know what goes on at Axialfest.

AXIALFEST 2017: General Info and Code of Conduct


Follow this link HERE  for general information and the code of conduct for the event. Although this is the 2017 article, the 2018 info and conduct code will be similar.



HERE is a great collection of video clips from 2017 that will give you more information and details on what happens at Axialfest.



Long time Axialfest attendee and frequent Axial blogger Skeeno put together a great four part overview of his 2017 experience. You’ll certainly get a lot of details from this read: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4


Want the full scoop in a short amount of time? The video above will give you the full four day run-down of Axialfest in just sixteen minutes. Get In The Know Before You Go!

Start Prepparing
The best advice for going to Axialfest and having a great time is not waiting until the last minute to prepare for the trip and event. Plan your custom builds now and get to work. Or do as many do and show up with a Ready To Run, ready to have fun. Plan out what you’ll wear, what you’ll eat and where you’ll sleep. If you stay off the grounds, you’ll need to find accommodations. Most stay at Cisco Grove Campgrounds, but please wait until an official announcement is made to call the facility to book your camping spot. Now, let the countdown begin to #Axialfest2018!

mAh Per Mile – The Quest To Determine Run Time


If you’ve ever sat around the campfire at an RC event or perhaps camped out with some buddies on an epic multi-day RC trail adventure, you may have heard the tale of “mAh Per Mile.” As the tale goes, a rugged RC adventurer, gear junkie, and as legend has it, talented Global Marketing Director has been spotted wandering some well worn trails through California. The man, well supplied with all the contents needed for a trail hike is on some sort of mission. Passer-bys stare at him in wonder as he trudges through the less taken path, his head down and muttering to himself. What is he saying? What is he doing. On one trail, the Redonda Ridge Trail it was evident things were getting more serious. He now travels in a herd of RC trail adventurers and some of his mutters turned into recognizable phrases. “mAh Per Mile” “mAh Per Mile” he kept repeating.

mAh Battery

What is this “mAh Per Mile?” It actually may be the answer to an age old RC question; “How long will my RC truck run for?” Real cars are rated by miles per gallon to determine how far can you travel. But there hasn’t been anything comparable in the RC world to define how far an RC rig can go. Well, we actually know who that mystery trail adventurer is, it’s Rodney Wills and for the longest time, he’s been determined to deliver answers to some of RC’s important questions and how long can you drive your SCX10 for is one. Rodney is on a mission to put numbers on paper and his quest to do so has been deemed “mAh Per Mile.”

This blog post will serve as an evolving report of a talented Axial team put together by Rodney to determine an answer to the burning question. The team will be testing different batteries, different rigs all in an effort to get out of the office and have fun on the trails. WAIT! I mean test RC equipment for the good of telling you how much time and fun you can get from your Axial adventure machine. Watch the videos and keep checking back to the Axial Blog to see how the science, testing and general goofing off unravels.

mAh Per Mile – Explaining Gas Mileage for Your Rig

There’s one question we hear a lot – how far will your rig go on one battery? To find the answer, we’ve created a little formula; mAh Per Mile. In Part 1 of this series, we break down the ‘how far will it go’ question and fill you in on how we plan to find out using this formula.

mAh Per Mile – Part 2 – Testing Our Mileage on the Trail

In Part 1, we discussed the idea behind mAh Per Mile – how far can your vehicle go on a specified battery pack. In Part 2, we take 3 Axial SCX10 II rigs out (with different electronic setups) to see how far we can go on a 2000mAh LiPo battery. The results are actually quite revealing…

SCX10™ Wheelbase Compatibility Guide


Far to often, questions about the differences between each of the SCX10 vehicles arise, especially surrounding wheelbase and body options. Questions such as “is this body compatible with that chassis?” or “which link kit should I order?” and so on. The beauty behind the SCX10 is its ability to change wheelbase lengths with relative ease, which also makes it possible to choose from a larger array of bodies thanks to this adjustability.

scx10_wb2All great news but what does it mean? Simple, say for example you purchased a Ram Power Wagon RTR (AX90037) but you really want to paint and build up a Jeep Mighty FC Body (AX31268), install the 11.4” TR Links Set (AX30549) to shorten the wheelbase and your ready to go. Or going the opposite direction, you’ve got a Dingo (AX90021) and want to build up a Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Full body kit (AX04035), just install the 12.3” TR Links Set (AX30550). At the end of the day, the link kits are your gateway to multiple body options for the perfect look with wheels tucked attractively into the wheel wells.


From a tune-ability standpoint changing the length of your vehicles wheelbase will change it’s driving characteristics. For example, the shorter 11.4” wheelbase will increase slow speed maneuverability while sacrificing some high-speed stability, great for tight technical terrain. While a longer 12.3” wheelbase will improve stability and decrease maneuverability, great for hill climbing. Tech Terms: Wheelbase – The distance between the center points of the front and rear axles on a vehicle. Maneuverability – Able to be maneuvered easily while in motion. Stability – Resistance to change, especially sudden change.


All together for your reference:


Crawler Setup – Key Elements


Whether your idea of competition is attending a national championship or one-upping your friend at the local park, getting your rock crawler dialed in for top performance is an obvious plus. Out of the box, your Axial vehicle is setup for high performance, but so is everyone else’s. You need an edge. The following tips cover the key elements that you should address when you want to have the best setup crawler possible. Every aspect of tuning is not covered. These are the key elements. Also, as you learn about setting up a rock crawler you’ll quickly see that almost everything is a compromise; what works for one type of competition and/or terrain doesn’t necessarily work for another.


Tires profoundly influence performance—maybe more than anything else. While there is no single best tire, you want to make sure you have the best tire for the conditions you’re running on. Also, not all rocks are the same, so there isn’t one best tire for all rocks. For competition, the softer the compound is better. The compromise here is wear and the need to get the tire’s foam insert right for the weight of the vehicle. Axial’s softer and stickier compound is called R35 (white dot).

While outfitting your rig with new tires will cost you, it is money well spent. You can learn more about picking the right tire here.


Center of Gravity
Specifically where your center of gravity (CG) is located isn’t important—meaning you don’t need to calculate its exact position. What is of key importance is that the CG is low—as low as you can possibly get it. A lower CG is always better. On a rock crawler, an optimized CG will help on climbs, descents and side hills.

There are a number of ways to lower your CG. First, identify your heavy components and try to identify ways to mount them lower. Sometimes lowering a component isn’t possible, but lighter options are available. An excellent example is your battery. If you’re using a NiMH battery, a LiPo will make a profound difference. If you’re already using a LiPo, consider a smaller pack. It’s understandable that if you’re trail riding you want maximum runtime. Just know that the compromise of a big battery with a lot of capacity is a higher CG. Instead of one large battery, consider two packs wired in parallel with one mounted on each side of the chassis. Another way to lower the center of gravity is to add weight to your vehicle down low such is in the wheels or on the axles. The problem with making your vehicle heavier is that it can rob power and decrease durability.

A great way to lower the CG is to the body as much as possible. You will need to open up the wheel wells with body scissors, but doing this will make a big difference in handling.


If you’re running a course with gates and judges tracking the use of reverse and each  touch of a gate marker or out-of-bounds line, maneuverability is of huge importance. If available, high clearance knuckles combined with universal axles provide maximized steering throw. If you’re running a G6 or similar event, this can move down your list of importance.

scale comp 14

Weight Distribution
Weight distribution, or weight bias, is a close cousin of CG. Your crawler will perform better on climbs if more weight is located over the front axle than the rear. This is why it is better to have the battery mounted up front. While this makes for a tighter squeeze and is a little harder to access with the body on, the end result is improved weight bias.

The difference between a front weight bias and a low CG is that with a front weight bias, you can have too much of a good thing. A 60/40 split is probably ideal. Like CG, however, it is best to start by moving components as opposed to adding weight.


There are drivers who can compete in competition after competition and never break a single part and then there are drivers who need every single heavy duty aluminum hop-up offered. Axial has numerous upgrade parts that improve durability, but you don’t need to buy them all at once. For crawlers it’s best to start at the front (aluminum servo horn, aluminum steering knuckles, aluminum steering links) and work your way back (heavy-duty gears, aluminum rear axle lockouts). The only exception to the front to back rule of thumb is driveshafts.

king 1

Ground Clearance
Increased ground clearance allows a vehicle to travel over obstacles without struggling or possibly getting stuck. The axles are the lowest components on the vehicle and the most likely to come in contact with obstacles. Without major modifications, the only way to raise axle clearance is to use taller tires.

Center skid plate clearance is increased when taller tires are installed and when the suspension height is increased. The latter, however, adversely impacts the CG so proceed with caution.


Rock crawling has changed. It wasn’t that long ago that rock crawling was literally crawling. Now, competitions are entirely different and you may need some speed, but it depends on the type of competition. The key here is to know what you’re getting into. A G6 competition is going to require you and your vehicle to cover some significant ground in the shortest amount of time possible. A 55-turn motor might be good for climbing, but too slow for the long spaces between checkpoints. If you’re running a G6, consider setting up vehicle so that it’s faster than a brisk walk. In other words, it should be closer to 10 mph than 5 mph. Over 10 mph and you might be giving up more crawling performance than you should, but it really all depends on the terrain. If you’re running brushless, a high voltage, low Kv setup provides the best of both worlds.

If you’re running on a super technical course with extremely challenging obstacles, a slow and torque-based setup might be ideal. Even then, however, having some wheel speed at your disposal can come in handy on many obstacles.


If you are expecting tips and tricks on getting more articulation out of your Axial Racing vehicle, you’re mistaken. The only thing massive suspension twisting articulation is good for is flexed out photos. In the real world, it will hurt far more than it ever helps you. In stock form, your Axial Racing vehicle has all the articulation it needs. More will just allow it to get twisted up like a pretzel.

This article explains why articulation is often misunderstood and overrated.


Suspension Stiffness
Rock crawlers generally work best with slightly stiffer rear springs than front springs and you want to avoid an overly soft suspension that easily collapses when side hilling. Most people don’t consider how increasing the weight of the vehicle with hop-ups and accessories might increase the overall weight and thus require stiffer springs. Stiffer suspension also resist torque twist far better than soft, mushy suspensions.

Grassroots Competitions


No events near you? No worries. You don’t need a hobby shop or RC club in your town to get in on the fun of RC competition. Don’t join in on the action, start the action. Check out these alternative ways to get competitive with your Axial vehicle. One bit of advice before you tear off: keep the rules simple and the focus on fun.

Backyard Racing

Rock racing is growing quickly, but not every hobby shop has a course. Most hobby shops don’t have traditional race tracks. If you want to race your Yeti across more than the lawn, the best solution might be to to make your own rock racing course. If fact, it’s far easier to make a rock racing course than race track. You’re really only limited by your imagination. The whole course doesn’t need to be rocks. Collect a few wheelbarrows full of rocks of varying sizes to create the rock section. Use dirt to build ramps up onto the rocks. Use a little more dirt to fill in the bigger holes and gaps in the rock piles and you’ll be good to go. Like desert races such as the Baja 1000, a race like the full-size King of the Hammers doesn’t have clearly defined lanes, so don’t worry about creating and grooming a whole track layout. Make your rock section and mix it up with the go-fast sections. A few cones placed around your yard can search as gates that have to be raced through in a certain order. Your homegrown King of the Hammers doesn’t have to be in your backyard. Scout out local parks. Many have rocky sections of naturally exposed rock or areas filled in with rocks. To keep it safe, make sure you’re away from other people.


Truck Pulls

While they are extremely cool, you don’t need an official pulling sled with a moving weight box. A dead weight box is easily made out of wood and good old fashioned tug-o-wars are a lot of fun. Dead weight pulls are best on smooth, level dirt. Make sure you’re prepared to groom the track as needed to keep it fair. Dead weight pulls can work two ways. You can load a box with a modest amount of weight such as one or two bricks and time each truck to see how fast they can pull the weight 10’ to 12’. The key is to use a weight most if not all of the vehicles will be able to get a full pull with. The other way is to start with more weight, measure the distance of pull and add weight for the vehicles that do get full pulls. Generally, the first method works best with a dead weight sled. When doing simple tug-o-war contest, pavement actually works best. On loose dirt, both vehicles often end up in a wheel spinning stalemate. Make sure you practice commonsense safety measures when having a tug-o-war.

backwoods course

DIY Scale Rock Crawling Comps

If there isn’t a scale club near you or if the local outfits aren’t offering what you want, you can host your own competitions. You might find out you’re not alone. One example of DIY scale competitions done right comes from the east coast. Eric Bresnahan of Connecticut and a couple friends started building a course on a dirt mound out in the woods. As their course grew, so did the crowds. Now, 40 people sign up for 1.9-tire based class. They have to cap the classes to keep the day manageable. And, they keep the rules simple and focus on having fun. As a result, hours after announcing a new comp has been added to the calendar, the classes fill to capacity. Many hobby shops and clubs wished they had that problem. The courses are carved into the dirt with a shovel, rocks and some manmade obstacles are added as needed and the whole thing is again only limited by their imagination. The group has also made good use of social media to grow. Almost all of the club’s communication is done via Facebook. As long as you’re extremely careful and exercise common sense safety measures, social media is a good way to find other people interested in RC competition.

racing 2

Alternative Racing

There are a lot of times when things are done a certain way simply because that’s the way it’s always been done. RC racing is often a perfect example of this. Many people stop racing just because they’re bored. Sometimes the focus is far too much on the competition and not on the fun. Nothing changes because people are so used to doing it a certain way. Nothing changes and racers disappear. Some inventive racers in southern California have come up with an interesting twist on the racing format. Two changes make for a very different racing experience. First, after each race, the running order is reversed. Finish first and you’re going to the back of the pack. In a big field, it pays to not break away if you don’t want to have to contend with trying work your way through the entire field on the next race. The second twist in the program is each race goes in a different direction. Talk about really mixing things up. They also allow you to jump in at the start of any race. It doesn’t matter if you missed the first three races. Again, the focus is on fun, not determining who’s the world champion.

Rock Racing Class Selection


R/C is a hobby, and a fantastic and fun one at that, but there is also a competitive side—most often in the form of racing. R/C racing has been around just about as long as there have been R/C cars. Racing first took off in parking lots on temporary tracks. As a whole, the hobby has come a long way from the days of parking lot racing. Today there are all sorts of type of competitions. The rock racing segment is a prime example of the awesome variety available. You can learn more about rock racing here. Getting started in racing or even just a segment new to you can be a bit daunting. One of the biggest questions is what class does my rig belong in and what are the rules. Using U4RC as the guideline, here is a breakdown of what class you can expect to compete in at a rock racing event with your Axial Racing vehicle.


If you have an Axial SCX10 with stock or stock-sized 1.9 tires, you can run and be competitive in the 1.9 Trail Limited or 1.9 Trail Pro classes. The 1.9 Trail Limited class is suggested because it is limited to solid axles only and the competition will not be heavily modified.


The 1.9 Trail Limited class only allows for 2S LiPo and motors are limited to 21-turn brushed motors or 18.5 2700 Kv brushless motors. The SCX10 RTR models include Axial’s 27T motor is within the legal limit for 1.9 Trail Limited. While the 27-turn motor will be slower than other motors allowed, your RTR SCX10 won’t require a motor change to compete.

Motor selection can be a little tricky if you don’t know how the motor nomenclature works. When a motor limit is set at 21-turn, such as in the U4RC 1.9 Trail Limited class, the rule is indicating that 21-turn and higher motors can be used. The fewer turns a motor has the faster it will be compared to a similar motor with motor more turns. If the motor limit rule indicates a brushless Kv rating such as 2700 Kv, the  legal motors are 2700 Kv or lower. This is because the higher the Kv rating, the faster the motor.

The 1.9 Trail Pro class removes the battery and motor limits, but is still limited to solid axles. This class will feature more heavily modified vehicles.

2900 kv

The Vanguard 2900KV brushless motor is legal for the 1.9 Trail Pro class and is an excellent motor for this class.


If you have a stock Yeti, the Yeti Limited class is the perfect class. The rules do allow you to upgrade the servo and servo horn, but the rest should be stock.

The next step up is the Yeti/EXO Pro class. There are no motor and battery limits. EXO Terra Buggies will need to be fitted with 2.2 tires to be competitive.

Heavily modified Yetis and EXO Terra Buggies are ideal for the Trophy 2.2  class. Metal cages are required, so this class is for more advanced racers.


Wraith and Ridgecrest
The 2.2 Competitor Limited class is limited to solid axles only, so this class is ideal for the Wraith and Ridgecrest. The U4RC rules even state, “This Class is designed for RTR and kits with Axial only parts.”

3150 kv

The 2.2 Competitor Limited class does restrict motors to 3150 Kv or less, but 550-sized motors are allowed. This means the Axial Racing Vanguard 3150KV is an ideal choice. This motor is loaded with torque and delivers more than enough speed.

The 2.2 Competitor Pro is also an option, but this class will be faster, so it is recommended that a Wraith and Ridgecrest receive some attention before entering this class. This class is ideal for a modified Wraith.


Yeti XL
Even though the Yeti XL RTR can handle 6S, the Yeti XL class is limited to 4S to keep speeds reasonable.


Don’t Stress
U4RC is understanding that many people may be building rigs without a real understanding of their specific rules, so they will allow anyone to compete the first time they show. They will review the rules and your vehicle and explain what needs to be done to comply with the rules. Violations will not be an issue for the first race day, but will be expected to be resolved for the second race.

AXIALFEST 2015: Waiver, General Info, and Code of Conduct


We are very excited to welcome all of you to AXIALFEST 2015. Like in years past, we will be leaving the confines of cement sidewalks, quaint neighborhoods and bumper to bumper traffic in favor of the great outdoors. The Cisco Grove Campground venue is the perfect spot for the Axial family to get together and share a weekend of fun and excitement. Please remember the focus of this event is all about having a good time. Please also remember that it is important to respect your temporary neighbors and this facility, as we want to come back in the future! Below you will find some helpful information to make your experience at AXIALFEST 2015 the best it can be. We are asking for a little homework before your arrival. This is not necessary, but should cut a tremendous amount of time out of your registration process, allowing you to get to the fun part of the weekend a little faster. We have also included some helpful tips for those of you who have not been to an AXIALFEST in the past as well as a checklist of basic supplies.

1. WAIVER – SKIP A STEP AT CHECK IN! If you want to cut the line to check in, download this waiver: ADULT and MINOR. Print it, fill out the info, and have it handy when you show up to check in! (For Pre-REG and ON SITE REG attendees)

ADULT Waiver:
MINOR Waiver(Under 18):



After checking in with the campground, follow the AXIALFEST signs to head up to the Pavilion.

Steps for Driver Check In:

Step 1: SIGN WAIVER at Waiver Booth in front of the Pavillion (OR SKIP THIS STEP IF YOU PRINTED IT YOURSELF!)

Step 2: TECH INSPECTION OF YOUR MAIN RIG @ Tech Inspection Booth



i. Line up by Driver Last Name

ii. Bring your pre-reg ticket confirmation with you and a form of ID

iii. Receive Event Wristband and Driver Bag!


i. All On-Site Registration MUST be made in CASH. NO EXCEPTIONS!

Note: Run Groups will be assigned here

Note: All ULTRA Drivers will be in Group G and run Trail G together

Step 4: PHOTO OP with your Main Rig

Step 5: CHECK SCHEDULE FOR YOUR ASSIGNED CLASS AND HAVE FUN! DRIVER CHECK IN TIMES: THURSDAY (6-9PM) – for those arriving on Thursday / EARLY DRIVER CHECK IN. FRIDAY (7:30AM-9:30AM; 5-7PM) – for those arriving on Friday. SATURDAY (8-10AM) – for those arriving on Saturday


AXIALFEST 2015 Supplemental Intel

Warnings About Nature

Heat- Temperatures in the Sierras can reach as high as 100 degrees during the day and below freezing at night. Weather can vary. We have seen snow, ice, rain, as well as 90* temperatures all during the same weekend at Cisco Grove. Be prepared for all temperatures and types of weather.

Altitude- Cisco Grove is in a High Altitude area. Those traveling from lower elevations may experience some altitude sickness. Altitude sickness may give you headaches and dizziness, loss of appetite and drowsiness. If you experience these symptoms it is recommended that you drink plenty of water. Headaches can be treated with a mild pain reliever such as ibuprofen.

Food and Water- There are very limited food vendors around the Cisco Grove Campground. Hours and miles of Scale RC fun burns a lot of calories. You will need to replenish those calories and fluids. Pack extra food and water than you are expecting.

Wildlife- We will be camping in the mountains. There are all kinds of wild animals in the nearby forest. Be aware of this at all times, watch where you step and be aware of your surroundings. When driving your rig, be sure to look up and pay attention to where you are going and what is in front of you.

AXIALFEST is a family friendly event. Here a few guidelines:
• Mind your language when in groups. Remember, there are kids around.
• This isn’t a fraternity party, please act accordingly.
• Respect others wanting to sleep at night. Mind the campground quiet hours.
• Dress modestly. Again, kids will be around. Consider what is printed upon your clothing. • Respect the campground.
• Clean up after yourself.
• Don’t waste water.
• Don’t park in undesignated areas.
• If there is a non-emergency problem, reach out to the On-Site Axial Phone Line (contact listed below).
• If there is a life threatening emergency, call 911.

ATV/UAV Rules Off road vehicles that are not street legal and registered may not be ridden around the campground. OHVs may take the dirt path to the dirt road to access the Fordyce Trail. Registered street legal vehicles can be driven on the paved areas of the campground.

Emergency Contact Info

- On-Site Axial Phone Line (760) 846-5504 – This number is temporary, and will only be turned on for the duration of the event starting Thursday July 17th. This number is a way to reach Axial staff if there are any issues that you would like to report regarding the experience you are having on site. You will be able to speak to someone anonymously so that the Axial staff may try to rectify the situation. This is not a basic information number, for basic information, please proceed to the Pavilion.

- Gateway Urgent Care 11105 Donner Pass Rd Truckee, CA 96161 (530) 582-2070

- Tahoe Forest Hospital Donner Pass Road and Pine Ave 10121 Pine Avenue, PO Box 759 Truckee, CA 96160 (530) 587-6011

- Nevada County Sheriff’s Office 10879 Donner Pass Rd # A Truckee, CA 96161 (530) 582-7838

Printable Checklist of what to bring:
• Headlamp
• Flashlight
• Axial RC
• Transmitter
• Batteries and Charger
• Spare Parts • Tools
• Food and water for three full days.
• Plates, cups, pots, pans, and utensils.
• Stove/BBQ
• Shorts
• Pants
• T Shirts
• Sweatshirt/Jacket
• Socks and underwear, lots of them.
• Hat/gloves
• Sturdy, close toed shoes, hiking boots recommended. Bring 2 pairs, in case one gets  wet.
• Soap, shampoo, towel, quarters for showers.
• Tent, pad, sleeping bag, pillow
• EZ Up canopy
• Extra towels/rags
• Wash buckets, soap, sponge
• Now that your list is complete, bring more drinking water


Above you’ll find the current trail and camp map. Each letter corresponds with a trail.  For example, if you are assigned to Run Group C, you will START here at Trail C indicated on the map and then work your way around to D, E, G, A, and B.

Note: Trail G is for ULTRA classes only.

Below are some recent AXIALFEST 2015 announcements:




AXIALFEST 2015 Intel


Axialfest 2015

“The 10th Anniversary Edition”

hosted by


From the Brian “DRVNMF” Parker RECON G6 base-station: happy anniversary to Axial R/C Inc! To all the Axial fans, what a great 10-years it has been! Since 2005, Axial has brought radio controlled fun to the masses with innovative products like the AX10, SCX10, XR10, EXO Terra Buggy, Wraith & the Yeti family. All of these vehicles have, in one way or another, helped push our radio control hobby to new levels. I am personally honored to host this very special edition of AXIALFEST, alongside the world class Axial staff, volunteers, experts, & Axial enthusiasts. I am sure this anniversary party will be one for the ages! – Brian Parker / let’s get this party started!


AXIALFEST 2015 10th Anniversary Intel

  • 10 scale items are mandatory. (An Axial SCX10 RTR meets this requirement.) 5 scale anniversary items are not mandatory, but highly recommended.
  • A tow strap is mandatory.
  • A winch is not mandatory, but highly recommended.
  • Waterproofing is not mandatory, but highly recommended.
  • An aluminum foil anniversary party hat is mandatory and must be worn during the first stage of the RECON G6. Wearing your AF anniversary hat during other stages and events may or may not get you special swag, but it will keep Big Brother from reading your thoughts.
  • A raft, kayak, or canoe is not mandatory, but highly recommended and will be used on one of the sections of the stage. If you drive this section at night, a light on your craft would be useful or put a glow stick in your watercraft for visibility.
  • A raft or boat to float your Axial scale adventure rig on water is not mandatory, but highly recommended. Your boat should have a 10th anniversary Axial Theme. Boats may be built to carry more than one truck, but boat sharing will be very difficult this year. Cruises are popular anniversary doings. It may be self powered or man powered.
  • Saturday Night Stage Anniversary Dance theme is the Sock Hop. Dance to your favorite oldies, but there is a catch. Not Mandatory, but HIGHLY RECOMMENDED, is that you wear a pair of Axial Socks. The best decorated pair of socks may or may not be rewarded with swag. Socks should be themed and include as many Axialfest 2015 sponsors as you can fit. Have fun and get your sock hop on!


AXIALFEST 2015 10th Anniversary Stage Intel


ADVENTURIST Intel; 1.9 Adventurist / 2.2 Adventurist / 40+ VET Adventurist / RECON Rascals / Driving Divas

  • The three RECON G6 Stages will feature separate Trail Sections; A-B-C-D-E-F and G.
  • Trail Sections will feature a variety of terrain.
  • There will most likely be no “Clear Dirt” on any section requiring rigs to transit through.
  • Drivers will be assigned their first Trail Section during registration. After completion of your first stage, you will complete each stage consecutively, meaning if you start on Trail Section-C, you will go to Trail Section-D and so on. Completing 2-sections is a great driving plan.

Ultra Class Intel

  • A tow strap & winch is mandatory!
  • Waterproofing is mandatory!
  • The Ultra Class stage will be kept scale. The water crossings may be hood deep rather than tire deep. The climbs may require winching. The Ultra Class will test your driving ability and your Axial scale adventure rigs capability.
  • A completely separate stage for Ultra Class drivers will be set to test man & Axial machine. Good Luck & Have Fun!


  • Side by Side off road 4X4 drag racing.
  • Single elimination.
  • Track will have boundaries, hit a boundary & be eliminated.
  • Lose to your opponent and be eliminated.
  • Win every race you’re in & be crowned the first ever, Axialfest Off-Road Rhythm Drag Champion!

Terra-X Race

  • If you have raced in the AF Terra-X, then you know, part of the race is reacting to the unique requirements of each moto.
  • Several motos will determine starting position for the Main Event.
  • Expect several different terrain changes on the track.
  • There will be no corner marshals, but a driver may have their own chase crew or corner marshal stationed at key locations around the track for motos. No outside help or chase crew is permitted during the Main Event.
  • If a driver flips his/her Axial rig over in the Main Event & cannot upright, the rig becomes track art until the finish.

A First Timer’s Guide to AXIALFEST


A First Timer’s Guide to AXIALFEST

Words and Photos by Matt Soileau

Are you planning on attending AXIALFEST? Is this your first time? Then this blog may be just what you have been looking for. This is Skeeno’s Guide to AXIALFEST. I will be covering all that you need to know about having a successful AXIALFEST experience.


Let’s start with what AXIALFEST is. AXIALFEST is a customer appreciation event held by Axial Racing to thank it’s loyal customers for their support. Each year is a bit different. For AXIALFEST2015, there will be several driving events including the world famous RECON G6 as well as the RECON Terra-Cross (RTX), and drag races. There is a grand awards ceremony on the final evening with so much giveaway swag it will make your head spin.



Last year I witnessed what seemed like every single participant received a prize. Many lucky participants scored brand new kits and RTRs. Some lucky drivers also scored a sneak peak of the Axial Yeti prototype before anyone else in the world got to see it! You definitely want to make sure you attend the awards ceremony.


At AXIALFEST you will witness a celebration of all things Axial. AXIALFEST is the Woodstock of Scale RC, a family gathering of Axial enthusiasts. Hundreds of participants from all over the world come together to share their love of Axial and scale adventure. Expect to see both male and female drivers from all walks of life. From singles to large extended families.



Not all are drivers; many are just there to support friends and family and watch the fun. There will be groups of people hanging out, wrenching on their Axial kits, cooking, and just generally socializing. Expect to find a very family friendly atmosphere where everyone is willing and eager to help out.




Step 1: Register

This year there is only one price for everything at AXIALFEST. $55 for each adult and $25 for each child. All preregistered drivers will receive a driver’s bag containing a limited edition AXIALFEST 2015 t-shirt and trucker cap, stickers, itinerary, and swag from Axial and the AXIALFEST sponsors. Word on the street is the swag will be extra special this year, so make sure you preregister now if you haven’t already.


You can register online right now at:


You may also register in person at AXIALFEST, but will not receive the driver’s bag. Extra shirts will be available for purchase at G-Central, but the driver’s bags are limited to only those who preregister. It is highly recommend that you preregister, so you don’t miss out on any of the limited edition swag from Axial and the official sponsors of AXIALFEST.



Step 2: Get a place to stay

Luckily, AXIALFEST is at a campground, a huge campground. Don’t be scared if you’ve heard all the camp sites are gone. They are not, but you may have to walk a little farther to get to G-Central as the veterans have probably already reserved their camp spots from last year that are closest to G-Central. Call Cisco Grove to reserve your spot ASAP.


Cisco Grove Campground

48415 Hampshire Rocks Rd., Cisco Grove, CA 95728

P: 530.426.1600

Cisco Grove is about an hour from Reno, NV and about an hour and a half from Sacramento, CA. Camp sites are about $30 per night and include water and electrical hookups. There are bathroom and showers available at the campground. Multiple people can share the spots to help divide the cost among several people.



Step 3: Start Packing RC Stuff

• Your kits (SCX10, Wraith, AX10, Exo, Yeti). Since this is AXIALFEST, the thing to remember is to pack Axial vehicles. You can leave your other RCs at home, as this is an Axial appreciation event. Before you arrive at AXIALFEST, make sure you do a once over on your kits. Clean, rebuild, and replace worn components to reduce chances of failure.


Don’t let something little stop you from finishing. I found this broken axle housing while cleaning up Skeeno Jr’s Axialfest rig just yesterday.

Also, be prepared for mud and water. Chances are high that you will be driving through both, so waterproofing your electronics is not mandatory, but highly recommended.


For more info on waterproofing, check out these past Axial blogs:

Waterproof Your Receiver

How to Waterproof your SCX10


• Transmitter, charger, and all of your batteries. You will be driving your kits probably more than you ever have, so you want to make sure you have enough mah to complete each G6 stage. A good rule of thumb is 10,000 mah, but more is always better. You will be able to charge your batteries at your camp sites with the available electricity at each camp site. Make sure to bring a power strip, so you can have multiple chargers going at once.

• Spare Parts. Bring all the spare parts and electronics you have. Driving for three hours straight can tax even the most stoutly built drivetrains. If you don’t have many spare parts, that’s OK. Most veterans will have something to help you out on the trail. Vendors will also be selling parts on site, so bring some spare cash.


• Tools. Chances that you will need to make a repair or adjustment are high. Bring all your tools, including wrenches, pliers, drivers, scissors, and soldering irons.

• Hydration pack/Camelbak. It will be July and most likely very warm. You will be walking long distances for many hours. Bring a backpack or pack hydration to carry water, trail snacks, and tools and spare parts. There is no shame in stopping on the trail to rest, eat, or fix your kit because the goal is to finish. For more info on what to bring out on the trail, check this blog: Make Your Own RC Vehicle Field Tool Pack

Low Ball

Camping Equipment

• Lots of people bring RVs and campers. Others rough it in tents. Some people sleep in their cars. A good night sleep makes for a happy AXIALFESTer. Bring the stuff that will get you the best sleep. Tent, Mattress, Sleeping bag, pillow, and extra blankets are highly recommended.

• Canopy/EzUp. It’s nice to have protection from the sun or rain while cooking or wrenching. If you have walls for your canopy, bring those as well.


• Power strip/splitter. As mentioned earlier, each camp site has water and power. Make sure you have enough outlets for all your chargers, soldering irons, lights, etc. Some sights have the RV outlets, not the standard 110 outlets you see at your house. Have no fear, the camp store has adapters for sale for cheap. I think I paid $5 last year.

High Ball

• Lighting/Lantern. You want to be able to see at camp if you have to have a late night wrenching session.

• Alarm clock. Events start early in the morning. You don’t want to be late or miss anything, so bring an alarm that will wake you up, especially if you are a night owl participating in after event revelries.


• Flashlight and Headlamp. There will be a night stage for the G6. You will need to be able to see in the dark. Don’t skimp. Get a headlamp with a high lumen output.

• Shampoo/soap/quarters. Showers are available, if you can find time, so you don’t get too ripe.

• Sunscreen. Don’t get burned by the high elevation.


Food and Beverages

• Water/beverages. A hydrated G6er is a happy G6er.

• Meals. Hungry equals grumpy. Be prepared for the breakfasts, lunches, and dinners for each day you will be there. There are no restaurants close by and the camp store has a very limited selection of edibles. That’s 3 breakfasts, 3 lunches, and 3 dinners, if you are planning on being there from Thursday until Sunday. Plan accordingly.

• Snacks. Trail mix and power bars are good to have in case you need extra nutrition in between meals while out on a G6.


• Stove/BBQ. You gotta cook that food on something, right?

• Regular kitchen supplies. Pots/pans/knives/forks/spoons. Think about what you need for each meal and make sure you bring it.


• Coffee maker and coffee cups. A nice cup of coffee gets me ready for each long day. I like mine with a little cream and sugar.

• Paper towels. For your meals and wrenching.

• Soap/sponge/towel/buckets. Good for washing your face, brushing teeth, and doing dishes.

• Toothbrush/toothpaste. Fresh breath makes socializing less awkward, especially after a few cups of coffee. No one likes morning breath.

• Ibuprofen/Aspirin/Advil. Bring the pain reliever of your choice. Your feet and legs will be sore if you are not used to extended hours of being on your feet. 1000 trail markers can equal several miles hiking around the campground.


• Shoes- bring sturdy shoes for mountain hiking. Hiking boots are recommended. It’s also a good idea to bring some spare shoes for relaxing at camp and flip flops for the showers. I’d also plan on extra socks. After 1000 trail markers and several miles, your feet will most likely be sore.

• Jackets/sweatshirts/pants/hoodie/beanie. You never can tell what Sierra weather will be like. Temps can vary from in the 90s during the day to in the 30s at night. One year it rained. Last year the nights were very cold. Be prepared for everything, so don’t just bring shorts and t-shirts. Pack for four days of clothing, plus extra socks and underwear.

• Swimming gear. There is a little swimming hole at the campground. My daughter makes sure we hit it every year.

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Step 4: Arrive

The first stop is at the camp store at the front of the campground. Pick up your campsite and vehicle tags, then go find your campsite. Get set up, so you can start the fun.


After you have camp set up, go find G-Central. G-Central is the central hub of Axialfest where all the activities begin. G-Central is located in the pavilion. There will be signs posted to point you in the proper direction. It is easily spotted, because you will see lots of large green Axial banners as well as the RECON G6 canopy, truck and trailer. There are usually other vendor booths also set up at G-Central. If you are not sure, ask someone. Everyone is friendly and helpful.


At G-Central you will pick up your t-shirts, hats, driver’s bag, and any other instructions. Inside your driver’s bag you will find the Axialfest itinerary, sponsor information, stickers, and some special swag from Axial as well as the official Axialfest sponsors. Make sure you preregister, so you qualify for all the driver bag goodies.



Don’t forget to check out the camp sites. Assorted vendors will also have their booths set up with their wares displayed and items for sale.


Trail markers will be everywhere! Don’t be surprised to see trail markers on the side of the road, next to your camp, in G-Central, pretty much everywhere. There are over 1,000 trail markers for the G6, so please do not disturb them. They will be needed for the entire event. Do not be tempted to take the one with your favorite number and risk the next G6er getting lost. Also, feel free to play with your kits, but please stay off marked obstacles. You’ll know because there will be colorful ribbon on certain sections.


What class are you in? RECON G6. Most AXIALFESTers come for the RECON G6. The RECON G6 is a scale trail run. At Axialfest, the RECON G6 is an extreme trail run. A course of 1,000 trail markers is set. Drivers start from G-Central and follow all 1,000 trail markers out, around, and through the Cisco Grove Campground, ultimately returning back to G-Central to finish. The general rule of the RECON G6 is No HOG, which means No Hand of God. That means you should not touch your rig. No flipping over or repositioning it if stuck. Use a tow strap or winch to make a scale recovery. Also remember to travel in the proper direction. The red trail marker is always on the right. Red on Right, get it?


Out on the RECON G6 trail, drivers will encounter a varied selection of terrain from dirt to rocks to mud to water to trees to whatever is out there. Have fun using your scale accessories like tow straps, winches and sand ramps to conquer the terrain. And here’s a little secret, if you see something that looks out of the ordinary on the trail, it might be a trail treasure. Attach it to your rig and drive it back to G-Central for a possible bonus.


Drivers have the freedom to drive as fast or slow as they feel. Most drive in small groups assisting each other when the trail gets difficult. Drivers during a RECON G6 are always happy to help out other drivers by loaning a strap, winch line, parts, or tools. Whatever it takes to help their fellow G6ers continue on the adventure. At Axialfest, the RECON G6 trail is often many miles long, that’s why being prepared is so important. Drivers and their kits need to be prepared to endure a long day of scale fun. And remember, Finishing a RECON G6 is like Winning a RECON G6.

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There are several RECON G6 classes to choose from. Here’s a break down:

Every G6er falls into one of these four classes. 1.9 and 2.2 denote size of your rigs wheels, not tires.

• 1.9 and 2.2 Adventurist- this is the largest class. It’s very relaxed and about having a good time with friends. If you are a first timer, this is probably your class.

• 1.9 and 2.2 Ultra- this is a competitive class. It’s a race. These drivers run. Also known as Cardio RC. Bring your trail running shoes if you choose this class. This class also has more than the standard 1000 trail markers. If you encounter them of the trail it is courteous to pull over and let them pass.
Bonus classes. You will be in the both the above and below classes if you fit into one of the categories below.

• Drivin’ Divas. The lovely ladies of AXIALFEST.

• RECON Rascals. If you are under the age of 16, aka 15 and under.

• 40 and Over Veterans. Old guys rule! Feel free to take your time. We need it.

Other events include the following:

TERRA-X ROCK RACE aka RTX. Rock Racing meets RECON G6! We test the limits of the machine and sometimes the man? Don’t expect a regular timed race. RTX runs on completed laps. Also, don’t plan on a driver’s stand. There’s a little cardio involved here as well. You may be jockeying for position both on the track and in the drivers’ area. You may also be marshalling your own vehicle. RTX has the following classes:
Terra-X Rock Race – 1.9-SCX10 Class
Terra-X Rock Race – Wraith Class
Terra-X Rock Race – YETI Class
Terra-X Rock Race – EXOTerra Buggy
Terra-X Rock Race – OPEN, run what you brung. AKA the Mike Pham class.

Yes, we are always trying something new… but it’s not new!

Concourse Show & Shine
Trailer queens that spit shine and show it off, minus the cobwebs please!
Once you are settled in, get ready to have a great time. Don’t expect much downtime. Once the action begins, it’s likely that you will be busy the entire weekend. Axialfest 2015 has set a tentative schedule below. Remember, times are subject to change, so be sure to check at G-Central for updates and LISTEN during the driver’s meetings.

Thursday Night July 16th, 2015:
6:00pm – 9:00pm Early Driver Check-In
6:00pm – 9:00pm Concourse Park Ferme
8:00pm – 9:00pm Judging of Concourse

Friday July 17th, 2015: TIMES SUBJECT TO CHANGE!!!
07:30am – 09:30am Driver Check-In
10:00am – 10:30am DRIVERS MEETING
10:00am – 01:00pm Terra-X
01:00pm – 02:00pm LUNCH
01:00pm – 02:00pm Driver Check-In
02:30pm – 04:30pm 4X4 RHYTHMDRAGS
05:00pm – 07:00pm Food Truck / DINNER (for those who don’t want to cook – bring your $’s.)
05:00pm – 07:00pm Driver Check-In
08:00pm – 08:30pm Driver Groups Staging
08:30pm – 12:00pm RECON G6 Stage-1 Night Stage (Headlamps Mandatory)

Saturday July 18th, 2015: TIMES SUBJECT TO CHANGE!!!
08:00am – 10:00am Driver Check-In
09:00am – 09:30am Driver Groups Staging
10:00am – 3:00pm RECON G6 Stage-2
04:30pm – 05:30pm Food Truck / DINNER
06:00pm – 09:00pm RECON G6 Stage-3 (Headlamps Mandatory)
08:00pm – 09:00pm Late or Trail DINNER
(you can eat out on the trail if time is needed so pack accordingly)
09:30pm – 11:00pm AWARDS Bonfire (bring your chairs and a stick of wood)

Sunday July 19th, 2015:
Sleep in and travel home safe or Sunday Funday for those who want to scale trail with us…
For more info, check out our past AXIALFEST reports.
Axialfest 2014 – Report By Skeeno
Axialfest 2013 – The Recap!
Axialfest 2012 Skeeno Report

Useful links:
Facebook Event Page
Recon G6
Cisco Grove Campground
How To Waterproof your Receiver
How To Waterproof your SCX10
Make Your Own RC Vehicle Field Tool Pack


What is Rock Racing?


Axial offers vehicles identified as rock crawlers and as rock racers such as the SCX10 and the Yeti, respectively. To make the perfect selection when purchasing your R/C vehicle, you need to know the difference between rock crawling and rock racing.

Rock crawling has been around as long as there have been off-road vehicles like the classic Jeep and rocks to drive them on. The Rubicon Trail in northern California might have originally been used by settlers in covered wagons, but the rocks on that trail have probably seen more rubber tires than wagon wheels. When people think of rock crawling, they often think of this iconic trail or a similar scene and driving over rock formations with beautiful vistas. They see rock crawling as slow, enjoyable and relaxing. They also recognize that it’s challenging. This is recreational rock crawling. It can be a pretty tame trip down an easy trail with a few rocks to negotiate or a hardcore excursion with ample body damage and winching. Recreational rock crawling led to the creation of competitive rock crawling. You probably already know that if it is automotive in nature, it can and will be made into a competition.


Rock crawling, as the name implies, generally takes place on rocky terrain and is not about going fast, but sometimes the skinny pedal is the only way to get up and over something. Not all rock crawling is competitive, of course, but when it is a competition, time is a factor and, thus, speed is a factor. Hence, you’ll see plenty of throttle used at rock crawling competitions. The course is most often marked with such items such as cones, tape or rope. Hitting markers results in penalties. So, competitive crawling requires a mix of speed and finesse. You won’t win if you finish with the fastest time, but hit every marker on the course and racked up the time penalties. Conversely, you won’t win a rock crawling competition if you miss every marker with a perfectly executed and clean run, but take all day to finish the course. As described previously, rock crawling is also a popular recreational motorsport. In this case, rock crawling is often called trail riding. Again, as long as the first Jeeps were available to the public, this type of rock crawling has existed.

rock racing

In the same way that just about anything automotive can be made into a competition, any automotive competition can increase in intensity if given a little time. Thus rock crawling has given us rock racing. Rock racing comes in many forms. The first type of rock racing evolved from rock crawling competitions that focused more on speed and less on the finesse needed to avoid markers and the accompanying penalties. Some rock racing competitions feature side-by-side racing by running two vehicles on the course at once. One of the more popular forms of rock racing came from a challenge made between desert racers and rock crawlers. The challenge became an annual event called the King of the Hammers. This race combined high speed desert racing and grueling rock crawling. Both forms of racing have high attrition rates and require specialized equipment.

Besides the increased speeds, one of the biggest differences between rock crawling and rock racing is that most rock racing has the whole field on course at once. Again, some small course rock racing might feature two vehicles that are running partially separated courses, but Ultra4 style racing such as the King of the Hammers has the whole field racing at once. This creates an interesting element as isn’t always easy to pass a competitor who’s stuck on the rocks you also need to get up and over.

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R/C rock racing is mostly patterned after the growing full-size Ultra4 style of racing. While people are R/C rock racing all around the country and world, one organization has stood out as a leading in developing a race format, rules and in promoting events. That racing body is U4RC. Following is an interview that helps explain what rock racing and U4RC are all about.

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The R/C community is starting to hear more and more about U4RC, but who is behind this still relatively new organization? U4RC is; Jerry Tobin (owner/founder), Brian Jones (owner/co-founder) and Jerry Ellifritz (owner/promoter). Between the three owners of U4RC there is a very solid background in R/C. Jerry Tobin has been in the SoCal R/C crawling scene since 2005. Jerry competed in competitive R/C crawling at a national level for several seasons and was ranked in the top 15 for USRCCA Super class. In 2009, Tobin created the infamous “King of the Compound” R/C endurance rock/desert race which U4RC, as we know it today, was born from. Brian Jones was around when R/C rock crawling was in its infancy and still on the pages of the monster truck forums, which stemmed from originally. Brian has been highly involved over the years in many aspects of growth in the crawling segment of R/C, including exhibitions, trade shows and was one of the original owners of RCP Crawlers. Brian too, was a national level ranked competitive crawler. He even attended the first USRCCA Nationals event in Moab, Utah. Jerry Ellifritz has been involved in R/C crawling for about five years, and comes from the scale side of the hobby originally. In those five years, Jerry has immersed himself deeply in R/C crawling including coordinating “G6” scale events, several one-off scale events and, of course, U4RC. Jerry’s involvement with U4 has proven to be invaluable to the advancement of this exciting, new segment of R/C.

Tell us about U4RC? What is its mission? Who is it geared towards? U4RC is an R/C rock racing organization that was launched in 2012. Our mission is to deliver R/C racing with a real, grass roots operating style and feel to it, unlike what is mostly available to the “go fast” R/C community. Currently the majority of the racers are from the R/C crawling world, although we are surprised constantly by the influx of inquiries and new racers from the “go fast” community. We feel U4RC is a great “crossover” of several genres, mainly because “racers” as well as “scalers” can find common ground within the classes available through U4RC. The class structure is set up so that everyone from a “newbie” with a box stock RTR rig, (SCX10, Spawn, Yeti, Wraith) all the way to advanced custom tuber chassis “builders/racers” have a competitive, fun class to run in.

How many tracks are affiliated with U4RC and what are they typically like? The list of tracks is growing quickly throughout the nation and globally, with tracks in SoCal, NorCal, Washington, Arizona, Florida, Minnesota and so forth. There are currently at least a dozen dedicated U4RC tracks at R/C facilities nationally. There are also U4RC tracks and clubs globally, including Canada, Australia, Austria, South America, Italy, Poland and so on (too many places to list).

Given that U4RC is modeled after full-size rock racing, tracks are typically a design that is different from what is considered the “norm” in R/C off-road racing. U4 tracks are not generally groomed (with the exception of watering), there is no sticky stuff, and you will never see a broom used on a U4 track. In contrast, our tracks usually include one or two rock gardens, a hill climb obstacle, elevation changes, jumps, whoops, wide open straights, stutter jumps, semi-tight technical sections, moguls, sand/gravel pits, etc.

What is the U4RC race format? U4RC runs a heads up heat, LCQ (Last Chance Qualifier), Main style racing format, where top finishing positions are key in every “Heat” round for advancement to the “Main” races. We feel this format is the purest way to find the best of the best for the day. Many forms of R/C racing run a “quickest time” advancement structure during lower rounds. Not at U4RC, we want to avoid drivers having an opportunity to sandbag early in the day by just getting a good “hot lap” time in and not conserving the rig because the track itself is a challenge along with the fellow racers you’re up against.

U4RC, like the full-size competition it models, combines go-fast racing and extreme rock crawling. Who usually does better, the racer types or the rock crawlers? That is a difficult question to accurately answer due to the varying terrains on the different U4RC tracks. The racer types definitely excel on the faster, less technical tracks where high speed vehicle control is key. The crawlers that learn to “go fast” well tend to be very successful due to the fact that you have to conserve your rig to a certain extent during the course of a U4 race. Overall the fastest racers to date in U4RC are the rock crawling crowd, which is very similar scenario when compared to our full size counterparts. Once the racer types learn to conserve their rigs, look out!

What classes are there in U4RC? Describe how the Axial Yeti, Wraith and SCX10 typically fit in the various classes? There are six classes in U4RC racing currently. There is a class available for every Axial rig made at this point. The classes are 1.9 Trail, 1.9 Comp, 1.9 Trophy, 2.2 Comp (Limited), 2.2 Comp (Open) and 2.2 Trophy. The SCX10 platform falls into the 1.9 Trail class, which is intended for trail rigs such as (but not limited to) a “G6” or “1.9 Deadbolt” or “Falken” SCX10. For Wraith owners, there is 2.2 Comp (limited), which is limited to a Solid/Solid axle configuration. The Wraith “Spawn” rock racer is a great starting point for this class. All Wraith models are legal for this class in their stock configuration. Axial Yeti owners have a place to race in 2.2 Comp (Open), which is open to the IFS/Solid axle configuration of the Yeti. The Yetis have proven to totally dominate 2.2 Comp Open since its release last year. Not to be forgotten is the fact that the majority of the 1.9 and 2.2 Trophy class rigs are either built using the SCX10 (1.9) and Wraiths (2.2) as their base for the builds.

 Is there a class for the Axial Yeti XL? We are currently writing rules for the next series that will include a class for the Axial Yeti XL. The XL hit the market just after the current rules were released last year. Given the success and performance of the RTR version and the recently released kit version, we definitely will provide a place for XL Yeti owners to compete. U4RC track in the future will be designed with consideration of the Yeti XL.

What goes into a good U4RC vehicle? Probably the most important thing would be choosing the right components. U4RC racing is hard on parts so choosing the right upgrades for your application is a must.  In an entry-level class where your car is close to stock, the smart thing would be to upgrade the smaller parts before, say, throwing a 3S pack and a 4000+ Kv motor in it. Those things are more suited for the fully built rigs of the mod and trophy classes.  Another very important aspect of setting up a car is suspension.  Good shocks, springs and the right oil combo makes a huge difference.  Since we race at different tracks, with varying technical levels and obstacles, that means the driver needs to be on top of their set-up at all times. Of course, as in all racing, tires are also a big deal. Some drivers actually sipe their own tires for different tracks, just as in the 1:1 world.  Fortunately, we have recently had companies designing not only tires, but many other parts specifically for U4RC racing and the results have been outstanding. If you take a look at our sponsor list you will see what I mean.

There’s an old saying in racing that to finish first you must first finish. That seems to have been suited for Ultra4 racing. Do you have any driving advice you can share for U4RC racers? You nailed it 100% with that statement. That old adage couldn’t apply any more that to U4RC racing. A conservative driving style will get your rig to the finish line, because you are racing against other drivers as well as the challenging terrain. The racers that have a “wide open” driving style generally run a higher risk of catastrophic equipment failures. This is due to the nature of U4 racing and the built-in obstacles throughout the track. Don’t expect the “turn marshal” to win the race for you. Keeping the rubber side down is the way to go. Walk the track prior to your race and identify any obstacles that you will want to avoid or gather your game plan for tackling those obstacles. Final bit of advice is to drive. Get out, drive your rig and learn how it reacts to your inputs from the transmitter.

What do you see in the future for U4RC? We believe that U4RC will bridge the gap between the R/C rock crawling community and the R/C racer community. With the amount of scale realism required from the rules and the extremely fast paced action on the track, it has aspects that both sides will be drawn to. U4RC is holding our first regional level event here on the West Coast this June that is sure to see attendance of U4 racers from all our neighboring states. There has also been overwhelming support and interest from many of the top manufactures in the R/C world, which leads us to believe our future looks bright.

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Photos courtesy of U4RC