Axial Papercraft Vehicle Kit Boxes

tech_papercraft

Being the die-hard Axial fan that you are, a while back you may have noticed the Papercraft Accessories blog that was posted up just before the RECON G6 B-Day II Scale event. Within the post you’ll find gas cans, pieces of luggage, wrapped presents, toolboxes, and even a boom box. Pretty cool considering that if the crafts ever got damaged you could easily print, cut, and put together a new one.

Now that some time has gone by, we figured it would be a great time to update the papercraft assortment to include ALL the current and past Axial vehicle boxes! Yes, ALL BOXES, which includes the original AX10™ Scorpion, EXO™, XR10™ and even the new Yeti™ SCORE® Trophy Truck®!

Just when you thought your scale garage/work shop scene was fully sorted out… Time for papercraft!

Scrambling to open the box immediately after delivery drops it off!

PC_all boxes-8430-2

Where it all started, AX10™ Scorpion
(click vehicle name for file)
PC_AX90001-8453

SCX10™ Vehicles

SCX10 II™ 2000 Jeep® Cherokee 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – Kit
(click vehicle name for file)
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SCX10 II™ 2000 Jeep® Cherokee 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – RTR
(click vehicle name for file)
img_8277_500px

SCX10™ Ram Power Wagon
(click vehicle name for file)
PC_AX90037-8441

SCX10™ Jeep® Wrangler G6™ Falken Edition 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – RTR
(click vehicle name for file)
PC_AX90036-8437

SCX10™ Deadbolt™ 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – RTR
(click vehicle name for file)
PC_AX90044-8433

SCX10™ 2012 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited C/R Edition 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – RTR
(click vehicle name for file)
PC_AX90035-8445

SCX10™ Jeep® Wrangler G6 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – Kit
(click vehicle name for file)
PC_AX90034-8439

SCX10™ 2012 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – Kit
(click vehicle name for file)
PC_AX90027-8435

2012 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon Papercraft How To VIDEO of the 2012 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon Papercraft

SCX10™ 2012 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – RTR
(click vehicle name for file)
PC_AX90028-8436

SCX10™ Trail Honcho™ 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – RTR
(click vehicle name for file)
PC_AX90022-8452

SCX10™ Dingo™ 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – Kit
(click vehicle name for file)
PC_AX90021-8434

Wraith™ Vehicles:

Wraith™ Spawn 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – Kit
(click vehicle name for file)
PC_AX90056-8438

Wraith™ Spawn 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – RTR
(click vehicle name for file)
PC_AX90045-8456

Jeep® Wrangler Wraith™-Poison Spyder Rock Racer 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – RTR
(click vehicle name for file)
PC_AX90031-8443

Wraith™ Rock Racer 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – Kit
(click vehicle name for file)
PC_AX90020-8450

Wraith™ Rock Racer 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – RTR
(click vehicle name for file)
PC_AX90018-8440

Yeti™ Vehicles:

Yeti™ SCORE® Trophy Truck® 1/10 Scale Electric 4WD – RTR
(click vehicle name for file)
PC_AX90050-8458

Yeti XL™ 1/8th Scale Electric 4WD – Kit
(click vehicle name for file)
PC_AX90038-8451

Yeti XL™ 1/8th Scale Electric 4WD – RTR
(click vehicle name for file)
PC_AX90032-8449

Yeti™ Rock Racer 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – RTR
(click vehicle name for file)
PC_AX90026-8442

Yeti™ Rock Racer 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – Kit
PC_AX90025-8454

AX10™ Vehicles:

AX10™ Deadbolt™ 1/10 Scale Electric 4WD – RTR
(click vehicle name for file)
PC_AX90033-8446

AX10™ Ridgecrest™ 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – RTR
(click vehicle name for file)
PC_AX90019-8448

EXO™ Vehicles:

EXO™ Terra Buggy – 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD Terra Buggy – RTR
(click vehicle name for file)
PC_AX90024-8455

EXO™ Terra Buggy – 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD Terra Buggy – Kit
(click vehicle name for file)
PC_AX90015-8447

XR10 

XR10™ – 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD Rock Crawler Competition Kit
(click vehicle name for file)
PC_AX90017-8444

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Original Axial Recon G6 BDay Bash II Scale Papercraft Accessories Blog Post

Axle and Suspension Designs Explained

solid axle articulation

Axial Racing vehicles are patterned after full-size off-road vehicles, and at Axial, scale realism is more than skin deep. That means that Axial’s RC models are more than just realistic bodies on top of universal or generic platforms. The SCX10, for example, features solid axles and a linked suspension. The EXO Terra Buggy, on the other hand, has what is called independent suspension, front and rear. The Yeti has independent front suspension and a solid rear axle. In addition to axle types, there are different suspension types found on the same axle designs. Here are the basics of axle and suspension designs and what they are generally best for. sc10 solid axle

Solid Axle

The solid axle gets its name from the solid axle housing that goes from one side to the other, not the axle shafts inside. The internal axle shafts aren’t actually a single solid piece going all the way across. Inside the housing, there is an axle shaft on each side. This is true in the full-size world and with Axial axles. Axial’s design is extremely similar to a real solid axle. The AX10, SCX10 and Wraith all feature solid axles front and rear. The SCX10 features a narrower axle design; the Wraith platform and the current AX10 feature Axial’s wider AR60 axle that is the RC equivalent of a full floating 1-ton design. wraith solid axle

Often the terms live axle and solid axle are used interchangeably. Most solid axles are live axles, but they aren’t the same thing. A live axle is any axle that is powered and not free rolling. When rock crawling, the solid axle is often the preferred design. In addition to the durability solid axles are known for, they also don’t lose ground clearance as a tire is pushed up during suspension articulation. The easiest way to visualize this to grab a pen or pencil and imagine it is a solid axle. Tilt one end up and over an obstacle and you can see how by driving tires up and over obstacles makes maintaining ground clearance easy. This exercise also makes it easy to see why it’s often best to place tires on rocks in the trail instead of trying to straddle them. independent

Independent Suspension

Independent suspension means the two opposing sides work independently from each other. If the right front tire hits a bump, the left front tire is not impacted. When speed is involved, the independent suspension is a better choice as it provides a much smoother ride. Keep in mind that when a tire on an independent setup encounters an obstacle, the tire and suspension components travel up, but the vehicle typically doesn’t. This allows the vehicle to go over rough terrain at a fast rate and remain stable. Picture all of the wheels moving up and down independently as a truck races across a desert terrain. The downside is when traversing rocks, the center section of the chassis will stay low to the ground as the tires move up and over rocks. Many full-size trucks have independent front suspensions (IFS) paired with a solid rear axle. This used to be common on only 2WD trucks, but is essentially the standard for the majority of factory trucks. There are many SUVs that have front and rear independent suspensions.

 

scx10 aluminum 3 link

3-link

A solid axle can be attached to the frame or chassis of the vehicle in a number of ways. Probably the oldest and simplest way is via a leaf spring setup. Vehicles that are engineered for better ride quality and articulation (suspension movement) now use coil springs. Using coil springs, however, requires the axle to be held in proper position (and still articulate or move). This is done via links. There are a variety of link setups. A 3-link setup, as the name implies, uses three links to connect the axle to the chassis. Take the SCX10, for example, the front suspension setup has two bottom links and a single upper Y-shaped link. Since the upper Y-shaped link attaches to the axle at one spot, this is called a traditional three link setup. To add a degree of confusion, the name a suspension design gets isn’t always based on the total number of links. This is because some suspension designs, even in R/C, will have a pan hard bar (or track bar) that helps locate the axle under the vehicle and keeps the axle housing from moving from side to side. So, someone may say they have a 3-link setup with a pan hard bar. This is a total of four links. It’s worth noting that a link design that is properly triangulated will not need a pan hard bar.

 

wraith 4 link

4-link

The Wraith uses a traditional triangulated 4-link suspension design. A close look reveals that at the axle the lower links are mounted far apart and then closer together at the chassis. The opposite is the case for the upper links, which have an even more pronounced triangulation. This design properly positions the axle, allows for plenty of articulation and is very strong. The previously mentioned Wraith has a 4-link setup front and rear. Depending of the particular version, you are most likely to find a 4-link rear suspension on the SCX10. The Yeti uses a 4-link rear suspension. And, the current AX10 platform, Ridgecrest and Deadbolt, use 4-links front and rear. The XR10 competition crawler also uses a 4-link design front and rear.

 

Example of an IFS and 4-Link vehicle: Yeti XL

Gearing for Speed

guide_gearingforspeed3

The Yeti, Yeti XL and EXO Terra Buggy all have one thing in common. All three are built to be able to go fast, and the thing about speed is you always want more. Many factors contribute to how fast a vehicle goes. The main factors include, but are not limited to, the motor, battery, and gearing. While upgrading the motor and battery are common ways to increase speed, gearing also makes a big difference but does so at a fraction of the cost of other modifications. The other thing to know is gearing changes are often needed when making the previously mentioned motor and battery changes.

pinion and spur

Gearing is primarily influenced by what are often called the primary gears, which are the pinion and spur. The pinion is the small gear that attaches directly to the motor’s output shaft.

plastic spur

The spur gear is much larger and is spun by the moving spur gear. The pinion gear is most often metal and spur gears are most often a composite plastic.

spur

There are many options available in the radio control hobby. As such plastic pinions are available, but should never be used for Axial vehicles. Metal spur gears are available and are, in fact stock, on both the kit and RTR Yeti XL vehicles.

The most common question after purchasing an RC vehicle is “how do I make it faster?” As previously mentioned, motors and batteries make a big difference, but gearing is a significant part. The key part is installing a larger tooth count pinion gear will make a vehicle faster. It will also decrease runtime and increase the heat in components such as the motor, speed control and even battery. Installing a smaller tooth-count spur gear will provide the same results. Again, bigger pinion, more speed. Smaller spur, more speed. Speed comes at the expense of more heat and excessive heat will ruin components.

pinion

When installing a new motor, gearing has to be addressed. The stock gearing has been optimized for the stock motor and expected battery. Sometimes nothing has to change, but gearing must be addressed. Often, a smaller pinion is needed to keep temperatures in check. If a battery change is made from NiMH to a 2-cell LiPo or further to a 3-cell LiPo, a significant gearing change may be needed. Often the best high performance setup is a high voltage battery with a mild motor and gearing.

In the end, what most people are confused about is how changing gearing impacts speed. The bottom line is a larger pinion gear will make your Axial vehicle faster. A smaller spur gear will have the same effect.

Project Wrexo – Bender’s Latest Custom Build

Now that Axial is the official R/C company of Ultra 4 Racing, I figured it was time to build a proper Ultra 4 R/C vehicle. If you are not familiar with Ultra 4 Racing it basically combines low speed “rock crawling” with high speed “baja” style racing. So, your vehicle has to be able to handle technical rock sections and high speed desert bumps in the same race, on the same day. Most hardcore off-road enthusiasts know a solid axle set-up front and rear rules in low speed rock crawling. And most of those same off-road fans know that independent suspension rules for high speed and jumps. There are a few competitors in Ultra 4 Racing that have been mixing the two set-ups together for a suspension system that works decent in both situations. Shannon Campbell was the first to try this, if I am not mistaken, and he has had great success winning the King of the Hammers crown in 2008 and 2011. Shannon’s rig runs independent suspension up front and a solid axle set-up in the rear. This latest custom build has been dubbed “Project Wrexo” and follows suit with that hybrid suspension set-up. Here’s a little sneak peek at this new build, more details and info to come soon so keep an eye on Axial’s blog and Facebook page.

Exo Terra Sand Buggy – 2WD Conversion

Axial Exo Sand Buggy
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When the Axial EXO was first announced I found myself going back to the web page over and over again just to look at it. Axial really nailed scale appearance with this rig and I knew I had to have one. So whilst daydreaming about what I wanted to do to my EXO, I began to kick around the idea of making a sand car. This vehicle would make an awesome sand car, it looks like those 100K sand cars flying around Glamis sand dunes. I began researching the drivetrain and what it would take to make this into a RWD sand buggy. Axial is great at using common gear train in their vehicle line up, so I was hoping to see the same gear sets in the EXO as their other vehicles. They did not disappoint, the differential components were the same as previous Axial vehicles with an open diff. This meant the parts would already be available to lock the center diff and make this a RWD sand buggy. The process to convert the EXO to RWD is very simple, have a look.
I elected to build this into a sand car while building the kit for the first time, so these steps can be followed exactly if you are building a kit from scratch, if you already have a running EXO and want to do this, simply remove the center diff and start here.

Step 1- Secure Axial part number AX30390, the Differential gear set.

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Step 2- Build center diff according to instructions, or open the center diff if EXO is already built

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Step3- You are going to lock the center diff by simply placing an extra spider gear in the diff which will not allow the diff to function. You will be using one of the 2 smaller gears in the diff gear set to accomplish this.

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Step 4- I have found that grinding down the outer diameter of the extra gear to be added to the diff really helps for ease of installation

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Step 5- Install the extra gear into the diff housing as shown

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Step 6- Seal up the differential and reinstall it into the EXO chassis. Be sure the differential housing sits flat against the spur gear, you may need to adjust the position of the extra gear a few times to get it to seat properly. If there is extra space between the gear and the diff housing, do NOT use the bolts to try and seal the space, the bolts will pull through the gear before you get a seal. Take your time and make sure everything lines up nicely before final tightening.

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I elected to remove the front axles and run some Pro-line Mohawk SC front blade tires for a proper scale sand car look and performance. I also elected to run the Pro-line Sling Shot SC rear paddles, as these tires are awesome in the soft stuff. If you wish to run 4 paddles you can leave the front axles in place, the locked center diff will help tremendously with the traction in the sand either way, and will offer the option of pulling and keeping the front wheels off the ground. Who doesn’t like wheelies…. Right?

Here are a few more shots of the Exo Sand Buggy in the studio!

Notice we just had to get the light bar working with LEDs
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and of course add some lights to the rear!
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We cant wait to hit the sand with this bad boy!
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Brandon’s Axial EXO RTR Terra Buggy goes Baja Bug!

The Axial EXO Terra Buggy stands out due is its unique looks and construction.  The integrated cage and multi-piece body seperates it from the norm, eliminating the standard body posts and bouncy lexan body found on most RC’s.  So what do you do when you feel the need to change the look of your EXO Terra Buggy?

First thing I did was find some inspiration.  While surfing the classified’s section on race-dezert I came across this heavily built VW Bug with an LS1 out back.  Perfect!  The EXO Terra Buggy is also V8 powered thanks to Turnkey.

Browsing Pro-Line’s website I found quite a few Baja Bug bodies.  After talking with them it looked like the Volkswagen Baja Bug Body 3283-62 was the best fit.

A few days later the fun began!  A quick trim and mock-up showed that this project had some potential. I started the build on my EXO Kit, so excuse its rough looks.

Some more trimming, fitting, and head scratching resulted in the following:

I immediately knew this body needed something to top it off…  How about Axial’s Universal Light Bar?  Part number: AX30709

Decision on the paint scheme was easy.  I know this is a VW and not a Toyota, but I couldn’t resist.

To finish off the lighting I installed a pair of the small round buckets included on the Axial Light Bucket Set.  Part Number: AX80045

Now for the fun part.  My AX90024 Axial EXO Terra Buggy RTR is still fresh and right out of the box.  Let the modifications begin.  With the body already trimmed to fit and the basic modifications required already laid out this was an easy build!

First things first, I removed those awesome green body panels. The rear wing was also removed for now.  Still undecided on the look with/without the wing.

Because the hood of the VW body is longer I had to look at finding a way to move the front bumper out of the way.  So for now I simply removed the bumper brace.  Add that to the pile of removed parts…

I also wanted to give this build more of a long travel stance.  Out of the box the EXO sets at about mid travel for ideal handling.  I decided to use some longer rear springs in the front to achieve the look I am after.  Some 14x70mm Firms did the trick.  Part Number: AX30221.

New longer springs vs. the stock front springs.  Both are Firm (Yellow) Springs.

End result, the new front stance.

To mount the VW baja body I decided to avoid using the existing hardware that was used to mount the EXO Terra Buggy body.  Instead I fabricated some body mounts.  Lots of ways to do this but here are the parts and placement I decided to go with.

I picked up some some threaded posts.  They were included with Traxxas TRA3727A.  The simply threaded into the existing hole that held down the old hood.

I also trimmed the hood mounts on the front to allow the body to sit as low as possible.  The two mounts circled in red were cut flush.

For the rear body mounts I dug through the parts box.  These started life as AX10 body mounts.  Part number: AX80005

I simply cut them to the required length and drilled a new hole in them.

Once my cut was cleaned up and I confirmed the length I used the existing holes on the EXO cage (where the original body mounts).  I used some M3x15mm Tapping Buttonheads that used to hold on the bumper compression brace.  Perfect length for this, and a great way to re-use parts from the “removed” pile.

The end result looks factory.  I even have some adjustment left to fine tune the fitment of the VW Baja Bug Body.

Next I decided to remove the rear light bezel.  The roof of the VW Baja Bug body will cover this, and removing this allowed me to get the body to set at the desired height.  Plus this gives me easy access to install the radiator.  Note: It is possible to remove the light bezel without removing the cage, I used an Axial 2.0mm ball driver.  Axial Part Number: AX20021

Guess what is included in the spare parts bag of the Axial EXO Terra Buggy RTR?  How about an officially licensed Griffin Radiator.  Score!

This parts tree is available separately as well.  Its a great accessory for your SCX10 or Wraith.  Part Number: AX80103

I decided to cut the radiator off and lay down some silver paint for scale realism.

Radiator assembly and installation.

Did you catch that additional parts tree with rod ends I showed in the picture of the radiator?  They provided a perfect solution for adjusting the position of the front bumper to fit the VW body.  I picked up some M3x25mm threaded turnbuckles, Part Number: AXA1633 to complete the assembly of the links. The following screws and nuts were used to mount the assembled links to the bumper and bulkhead:

M3x45mm Cap head.  Part Number: AXA0094
M3x18mm Button head.  Part Number: AXA118
M3 Thin Nylon Lock Nuts.  Part Number: AXA1052

Installed:

One thing I really liked about the 1:1 inspiration was the overall width and stance.  I decided to mimic this look by simply installing some front wheels and tires on the back of the EXO.  The EXO Terra Buggy comes with narrow front wheels/tires and standard rear wheels/tires.  To match the narrow wheels/tires on all 4 corners I needed the following parts:

2.2 3.0 Raceline Renegade Wheels – 34mm (Chrome/Black) Part Number: AX08106
2.2 3.0 Hankook Dynapro Mud Terrain Tires 34mm Part Number: AX120107

Getting close!!

Here is my final pile of removed parts.  Looks like my EXO Kit gets some fresh body panels and a new wing now!

Here is a shot of the cutouts on the hood to clear the shocks.  Also note the cutouts for the front bumper, this wasn’t necessary but I didn’t want to take away too much clearance from the front by pushing the bumper any further forward.

Hmm, something is missing back here.

Ahhh, my Turnkey V8!  Axial Part Number: AX04031

This also includes the seats and dash, I’m saving that for a potential part 2 of this build.

Trimmed, painted, and stickers applied.  Too easy!  My EXO RTR should be much faster now…

Install time, simply remove the 2 button head tapping screws holding on the center brace from each side and it comes right out. (4 Screws total)

I grabbed 4 of the M2.6 button heads that held all the original green body panels to the cage.  These will be used again to mount the motor.

Once mounted it simply slides into place.  The detail of the motor and radiator should definitely make this VW Baja Build stand out.

Ready for it?!?

The completed build is definitely very unique.  It was surprisingly simple to do as well!  The EXO Terra Buggy platform has a ton of potential for scale builds and replica’s.  Already brainstorming the next EXO based project, hope you enjoyed this one.

EXO Terra Buggy Build Tips: Motor Mount

The Axial EXO Terra buggy includes a very unique motor mount.  The adjustable mesh screw and the dovetail groove are both unique designs for ease of adjustment and maximum holding strength with minimal effort.

Lets go over the basic installation and assembly of the motor mount.

Step 1: With the motor mounted onto the slide use this screw to adjust your mesh.  You can slowly adjust the mesh as you tighten or loosen this screw, once set you will be able to remove the slide with the motor attached and install it again into the same exact position. Use a 2.5mm allen driver for this adjustment screw.

Step 2: Once the mesh is set install the M4 set screw in the top of the motor mount.  Do not tighten this screw all the way down yet.  Use a 2.0mm allen driver here.

Step 3: Continue tightening this set screw, you will feel the screw stop once it hits the motor mount slide shown by the green arrow on the step 3 image above.

Step 4: Once the screw has touched the motor mount slide you only need to turn it another 1/4 turn.  Or 90*.  This will snug up quickly and lock the motor slide into place.  Over tightening this set screw will cause damage to the motor mount or the motor mount slide.  1/4 turn is all you need here.

DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN THE M4 SETSCREW!  YOU WILL DAMAGE THE MOTOR MOUNT.

Here is an image from Step 22 in the EXO Kit manual.  You will see the slide attached to the motor, and the motor mount attached to the chassis.

**Worried that the extra 1/4 turn past snug isn’t enough?  Here is why it works.

The Motor Mount has a male dovetail, while the motor slide that the motor mount attaches to has a female dovetail.  When the M4 setscrew is tightened you are not only applying pressure to the point of the set screw, but also to the entire surface of that dovetail.  This increased surface area means you have that much more material holding the motor slide into place. Trust the surface area! Over tightening the set screw will actually decrease this surface area and potentially break the mount. AGAIN, DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN!

Here is an image of the added surfaces from the dovetail.  This is holding the motor mount slide into place.  Keep in mind these surfaces are on the front and back.

Axial EXO Status

Dear Axial fans, enthusiasts and potential customers,

We wish to express our sincerest apology for the delay of the AX90015 Axial EXO™ Terra Buggy.  We are working very closely with our global distribution partners in ensuring the EXO reaches retailers by March 13, 2012. At Axial, we hold ourselves to the highest quality standards possible. Our decision to delay the delivery of the EXO to market was made to assure you get the best brand experience possible.

Again, we are sorry for the delay and we are always very thankful for you choosing Axial as your product brand of choice.

Sincerely,
Axial

Birth of the EXO Terra Buggy

The Wraith™ gave Axial it’s first taste of speed, and while speed was not the total pursuit principle of the Wraith, we still sought after more.
Axial Wraith; Telling of the EXO Terra Buggy Story

Axial’s R&D team started with a clean slate and took an in depth look at the off-road desert scene before starting the EXO Terra Buggy project.
Desert Trip Nov 2011
ICON Vehicle Dynamics
ICON Vehicle Dynamics
ICON Vehicle Dynamics
The design conclusion was, that if money was no object then we wanted the best of best and best of each type of desert rig. Plain and simple, trophy trucks are cool! But a Class-1 buggy is more practical and would easily allow a design to consist of four-seats much like a fun sand car. You could simply say it is a four seater sand car, but we all know that sand cars do not work in the desert and while a full-size 1:1 with 4WD is crazy expensive, this is our dream and we wanted our dream rig to be 4X4! Yes, we know the EXO does not exsist in the 1:1 world, and that is exactly what we intended – TO DREAM! Just not to the moon.

Axial worked directly with Hankook for tire development:
Axial version Hankook Dynapro A/T
Paul Jho of Hankook checks out the Axial Version Hankook Dynapro M/T
Paul Jho of Hankook checks out the Axial R/C version of Hankook Dynapro M/T.

Four Wheeler April 2011
Hankook? Off-Road? Did anyone read the April 2011 issue of FOURWHEELER magazine? The Hankook Dynapro MT was crowned FIRST PLACE in the Ten-Way Tough-Tread Shootout!

Matt Kearney of Axial Inc
Matt Kearney, Head Of Research And Development at Axial Inc. Many of you know him simply as “AXIAL” on the RCC-network. His desk is never this messy, I just fixed it up like this so you can treasure hunt for hidden items…

Brandon Coonce of Axial Racing
Brandon Coonce, R&D Product Designer at Axial Inc. He is the Lead Designer for the EXO Terra Buggy project; has a Bachelors of Science in Mechanical Engineering from University of the Pacific. I think there is a running joke that he is “son of Badger” on RCcrawler.com I need to investigate that story more, but without a doubt, Brandon is super talented and very nice too! He also lead the design team on the XR10.

Jamie Seymour of Axial Inc
Jamie Seymour R&D Product Designer at Axial Inc. Jamie was the Body Designer for the EXO project – he has a Bachelor of Science in Transportation Design from world renowned Art Center College of Design in Pasadena. From pencil to pixels, then add in some drums as Jamie is our resident band member.

Axial Meeting
The Axial team made several decisions even down to the body details as we wanted to create something that look as modern if not more so than anything already existing in the full-size market. We think our man Jamie created what has to been the coolest looking body we have seen in some time! Any full-size companies looking to us for inspiration would be an honor!
AXIAL EXO Concept Drawing by Jamie Seymour

Axial has a mixed and varied passion for rocks. Previously we have only shown you how we like climbing on them… But we also like spitting them too!
Axial EXO Terra Buggy Rock Splash
And we try to creatively capture and show things as well, such as with this image. Yes, we takes lots of pictures and we like to tease you with images from our testing sessions.

Axial EXO Terra Buggy AX90015
The product has been blessed by a Baja Champion.

Axial EXO Terra Buggy AX90015
Rory Ward of Racers Only: cartoonist, communicator and “historian” for the off road community, has given his blessing to the EXO™. He even knocked out this little drawing for us! Who the hell is Rory Ward of Racers Only? Check this out: http://axialracing.com/wordpress/2011/10/24/rory-of-racers-only/

Hundreds of hours of research and development in new directions for Axial resulting in what is called the EXO™ Terra Buggy.
Axial EXO Terra Buggy AX90015
The result of all this passion, time and creativity have resulted into a new tool for the “toolbox” as we’ve expanded our arsenal.

Axial – Bringing Dreams To Reality Faster!™

Check out the product page:
AX90015 Axial EXO™ – 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD Terra Buggy – Kit

The Official Axial EXO Terra Buggy Video