SCX10 II Trail Honcho Truck Tips & Tricks For Noobs


Getting your RC adventure underway has never been easier with the well equipped, affordable SCX10 II Trail Honcho ready to run. This revival of the original Honcho body, from the famed SCX10, now features an updated electronics package combined with improved SCX10 II platform. It’s aimed at getting anyone into the hobby and on the trails with success. It of course is also a great truck for the seasoned enthusiast. But our focus here is on the many who will pick up an RC transmitter for the first time with the Trail Honcho and we want their first adventure to be the best of many trail driving experiences to come. Here we’ll go over all the basics from the unboxing to checking over your rig for its first run, tips for your first drive and tricks to keep it in proper running order.
Honcho 3

Before just diving into your new RC adventure, take the time to unbox and educate yourself about everything that encompases your new Honcho kit. Inside the box, you’ll need to cut the zip-ties securing the truck to the inner box support. Remove the radio from it’s packaging and dip into the bag with instructions and accessories. The most important step here is to read the manual. Although we’re walking you through the paces here, it is always best to familiarize yourself with the manual in case you have any questions in the future. After your up to par with manual, take a look at what is included with the kit. You’ll find a bag of “extra parts” these parts are unused during the assembly of the kit and may be used for future projects once you get hooked on your Axial adventures and trust us, you will get hooked. There will also be some basic tools in the kit, these should be transferred to your adventure backpack as they make great tools for on-trail repairs. And finally you’ll notice some green “domes” we’ll talk about this later.

Honcho 2
Honcho 1

We’re moving onto the fun part; getting your Honcho going. First remove the four body clips that secure the body to the chassis, remove the body completely and set it aside. Now you can access the battery tray. At some point at your local hobby shop or online, you’ve purchased a battery and charger for the rig. Locate the battery tray and unhook the Velcro strap. Slide your charged battery into the tray and secure the velcro back in place to retain the battery. Next move to the transmitter and install four AA batteries that you supply into the radio. Power the radio on using the switch on the face of the radio. Now move back to the SCX10 II and plug in the battery. The battery plug is your on/off switch for the truck. Tip: The radio is always on first and off last. Your SCX10 II is now powered up and ready to go after placing the body back on the truck and securing it with the four clips.

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Head outdoors and place the Honcho on the ground for a quick systems check. The electronics should be dialed in from the factory, but things can happen. You’ll want to check to make sure your trims are set properly. First is your truck moving on its own when you power it up? If so, you will need to use the throttle trim on your radio to reset your neutral point. Use either button for throttle trim to find the neutral. If you tap the trim on one side and the truck starts moving more, it means you’ll need to use the opposite button to get the throttle back to neutral. Keep tapping the button until the car stops (is at its neutral point.) With the throttle set, check to see if the truck tracks straight. With the vehicle pointing away from you, give the truck a little throttle. Note if the truck tends to “drift” towards the left or right. If so, use your steering trim to find the neutral point of the steering in a similar fashion to the throttle adjustment.
Honcho SCX10 2

Wait! Now that your truck is trimmed, you probably have the urge to pin the throttle and see what the truck can do. We’ll get there. First start by driving slow in a figure eight pattern. This means giving the truck a little bit of throttle trigger input and steering the truck in a figure eight pattern; turn the wheel right, go straight a bit, turn the wheel to the left, repeat. This will help you get a feel for how the steering feels reversed when coming towards you. When the truck is going away from you, steering the radio wheel to the right will always turn the truck to the right, but will feel reversed coming back towards you. Get a feel for the throttle range in both forwards and reverse. Note: the throttle is not an on/off switch and is proportional. In trail truck driving much of your rock crawling adventures will happen at a slower speed.
Honcho SCX10 7

Before going out and driving on the gnarliest terrain you can find, practice on something less harsh. Find small hills or rocks with a slight incline to drive on. First drive straight up and down the obstacle. Note the amount of throttle it takes to make the incline and how the drag brake in the speed control affects the decline. Next drive up on an angle. Like a real vehicle, the trucks center of gravity may want to cause the truck to roll over. Determining the type of angle you can drive on before the truck wants to roll over is all a part of developing driving skill.

Honcho SCX10 6

With a general feel of how the Honcho drives, you can venture out for tougher obstacles. Find steeper inclines, off-set rock ledges, varying rock surfaces and use your newfound vehicle control to try and get your truck over the terrain. Think about where the wheels need to be places on rocks, how much steering you need to use, how much throttle and where will the truck be positioned when you’ve tackled what’s in front of you. Remember, you need to set yourself up for the next obstacle too. Then it will become time to refine your lines, challenge yourself and that’s where those little green domes come in that you found in the kit. These green things are gate markers and they are set on trail courses for your rig to pass through. They’re usually placed in positions that will challenge your skill. Find challenging parts on your trial and place these markers so you can practice driving through gates.

Honcho SCX10 3

What happens when your truck rolls over? Well, in real life, if a truck rolls over, no big hand reaches down from the sky to flip it back over. So, you need to use vehicle control to try and right the truck. If the Honcho is completely upside down, try using throttle and steering to “wiggle” the truck over. Or towards a nearby object. The point is to get the wheels to grab onto something to help pull it back over. If the truck is on its side, you can turn into the ground and give it throttle. This will oftentimes pull the truck out of the roll over and back onto its wheels.

Honcho SCX10 5

The rest of your driver education is up to you. To improve your skill, try locating nearby parks or even an urban adventure away from the public. Finding new places to have an adventure each time you go out with the Honcho will improve your driving skill. But in the bigger picture, you’re also going out and finding new adventures for yourself. Adventures that will not only build skills and love for a hobby, but will also build memories.
Honcho SCX10 4

Once your adventure outdoors is over, you’re not exactly done with your Honcho rig. A maintained rig is always a well performing rig. Take the time to remove any dirt and debris from the truck. A simple 2” paintbrush and a little elbow grease knocking off dirt from the truck can clean it up. Compressed air works as well. If your adventure lead you into the wetlands, take a look at our Driveline Maintenance Tips to help you with your clean-up procedures.
Honcho SCX10 1

At some point, You’ll want to join the custom club. Installing option parts to make your honcho stand out or to make it more durable for the adventures you’ll put the rig through. Here are five option parts we recommend you take a look at when taking your SCX10 II Honcho to the next level.  

Gear Set (48P 28T, 48P 52T)
Part- AX31585
If you read the story of the Honcho taking on the Redonda Ridge Adventure, you saw the rough terrain eventually took its toll on the transmission gears. Luckily this is an inexpensive upgrade up to steel gears if you feel your truck needs it.

Aluminum Servo Horn 25T (Hard Anodized)
Part- AX30836
The steering is among one of the most abused parts of any vehicle. Swapping the stock plastic servo horn for the aluminum option could prevent any unwanted steering issues on the trail.

M4 Serrated Nylon Lock Nut
Part- AXA1046
For obvious reasons the wheels endure a lot of abuse during use. This on occasion can lead to a wheel nut backing off. The locking serrated nuts grab onto the wheels for extra security.

SCX10 TR Links Set – 12.3″ (313mm) WB
Part- AX30550
Although the links on the SCX10 II Honcho have been greatly improved over the previous units on the SCX10, upgrading to aluminum links is a popular upgrade for many adventurers.

Steering Upgrade Kit
Part- AX30426
Like the suspension links, the stock plastic steering link can take a lot of abuse and flex during use. In this set, you can use the long link to upgrade your SCX10 II.

Honcho SCX10 7
With your new found hobby and new found key to adventure, keep things interesting by continuing to drive on new trails, build new courses in your backyard, continually modify and upgrade your Honcho to reflect you, your likes and interests. Every day is a new adventure behind the wheel of the Honcho and can give you new found enjoyment outdoors while learning new sets of skill. When you do conquer a new challenge, be certain to document your experience with a photo on social media and give it the hashtag #AxialAdventures so other adventurers can see what you’re up to.


Desert Turtle Racing KOH 2018 Race Recap

Desert Turtle Racing KOH 2018 Race Recap

KOH 2018 Race Week:
First and foremost, we were stoked to be setting up our pits in the Lasernut Laser Town hanger. We arrived at Laser Town and got the Turtle set up in the hanger and set up all our camp stuff. We did a little last minute shock tuning on the Rock Krawler shocks to get them dialed in for race day, then headed over to get registered for the race. Monday was our qualifying day and in practice we discovered that the motor was running not so peppy. We learned that we had to shift to 4-Lo just to get up the hill climb and then shift back into 4-Hi to finish the lap. It hurt our qualifying times a bit but we were still able to get an 11th in class start for Thursday’s race. We also discovered that we had a melted coil pack and spark plug that were causing the engine to run poorly. We were able to get in a run around Lap 1 of the KOH course and mark down some trouble spots on GPS as well as set up our lines to get through the new “Notches” area that Ultra4 added to the course this year. We were feeling pretty good about the course of Lap 1 and the car was running well. We headed out for a pre-run of Lap 2 and got through a couple trails but unfortunately cracked the oil pan on a couple big hits and that caused us to call the pre-running extremely short. A big part of our pit support this year was provided by Dust Junkies Racing and they just so happened to be near where we broke down and gave us a helping hand to get back to Laser Town. We spent the rest of our pre-running time hunting down an oil pan and making repairs to the rig and studying the course map.


KOH 2018 EMC Race Day:
Let’s just start with, the green flag dropped and we were off and running! Darin was behind the wheel and ready to attack the desert lap. The first few miles had us on edge, knowing that race nerves can cause you to overdrive the rig and/or potentially suffer flats. As we clicked off the early miles we passed many rigs that had suffered exactly that, and a couple others with some quick driving decisions. We were able to maintain a good pace and cruise through unscathed. As we passed by RM12 we felt the rig was doing well. We radioed to Dust Junkies at Remote Pit 1 that we didn’t need a tire change and opted pass through without a stop. They responded with “Well done. We’ll catch you on the flip side at RM48”. We waved on the way by the pits and were feeling great about the rig. We kept clicking off the miles, passing other racers along the way. As we arrived at “The Notches” a little ways past RM24 we followed a couple other rigs into the banner area. Again, we passed a few others that were floundering in the rocks not knowing where to go. We stuck to our pre-planned route and managed to maneuver around a couple more. As we exited, we were on the tail of a 4800 rig and we decided to go for the pass in a whooped-out section to the drivers left. We made the pass, but we also went for a good ride when the front end got bucked pretty high, and we were reminded that we needed to tone it back.


We got back on our pace as we rounded the half-way point at RM32, and we continued carrying a good pace, picking our way through the tight desert section before reaching RM47, where we again needed to radio to the Dust Junkies at Remote Pit 1 what our plans were. We chatted for a bit about how the rig was doing, we were not hearing any strange sounds, and we again didn’t need to stop for a tire change. We hit the pit zone and again gave the big thumbs up as we passed by. Heading out crossing the base line we knew the speeds were going to pick up as we rounded the big bend at RM52. Around RM54 we had a close encounter with a bird — this bird was about 20 feet off the deck and clocking us for speed about 50 feet off the front passenger corner of the rig. At least it seemed that close. So we mashed the gas to pick up the pace and see what they would do. We gave them the applause and enjoyed the camera man hanging off the side of the helicopter. Let’s hope it makes the cut into some footage somewhere.


We reached the intersection at the baseline exit and headed out across the dry, dusty Melville lakebed. At times we couldn’t see much more than a few feet in front of us. Picking our way up into the top of Resolution, preparing for our drop down it and Backdoor, we knew we had just a couple more miles before we were back to Main. We had a bit of a close call at Backdoor — we got in a little bit of a hurry to prevent another rig from passing us and did a great nose pose with the rear tires straight up in the air. We hit the gas to prevent the roll-over and hit the rear bumper hard on the rock wall behind us… BUT we were down and all four wheels and the rig was still moving. We called in to pits that we were down but took a hard hit and would need to look the rig over really well. We made the last of the little climbs before hitting the short course and the Main Pits. At this point we were pretty stoked Darin just had a VERY clean run on Lap 1 and suffered ZERO flats with our Falken tires. We had a feeling that we were sitting in a pretty good position and it was time to change drivers.

And so the race continues… Lap 2 — Randall is now in the driver’s seat and ready to take on the rock sections. Before we got there, we had to run through the first 8 miles of the Lap 1 again, and then around the desert for another 9 miles before reaching Remote Pit 2A. Again, we kept a descent pace intent on not overdriving the rig. As we reached Remote Pit 2A the rig was feeling pretty good and we called in to let them know that we would just be passing by. We headed into the first rock trail, Boulder Dash, and made pretty quick work of it. We headed down Upper Big Johnson and continued across the valley and around to the bottom of Wrecking Ball. While we were in Wrecking Ball we had a few difficulties leading up to the waterfall but cruised right up the bypass line and continued on. At RM85 we headed over to Fissure Mountain to run across the top of the range and down to Sledgehammer. Another new thing for the Ultra4 race this year was the addition of two trails at RM90, Idle Issues and Her Problem, two trails that I did not get to pre-run nor even see. As we approached the trail we saw the trail markers but the terrain looked untraveled and there were no obvious lines. There was no stopping us on this trail we picked it apart, as if we were cutting a new trail. We had a little trouble getting through Chocolate Thunder but were able to keep our cool and get back on track.

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Once we got over into Jack North we felt something strange in the steering and decided we should stop and take a look. What we discovered was the mount on the axle for the Hydro Assist Ram has been torn off and the Ram was just hanging there cycling left and right. We also discovered that all of the drive flange bolts on the rear axle (BOTH SIDES!) had backed out and we were leaking a ton of gear oil. We tightened up the flange bolts, removed the hydro-ram and capped the hydro lines so we could continue the race. We wheeled up to the crux of Jack North and, like a replay of last year, Darin got out and spotted the rigs through and then got us through and we headed for Jack Hammer. The problem with not having Hydro Assist is that every rock the tires come in contact with will jolt the tires one way or another and that makes it very difficult to steer and stay on the line that you need to get over the rocks. Coming down Jack Hammer we made sure to plan way ahead and keep the car on the right line. Heading up the sand hills at RM93 was pretty fun with the new motor screaming as we made our way. We got around to Hells Gate and continued to struggle with the ability to steer and stay on the right line. Thankfully we had a new ZEON 10 winch from Warn on the rig to get us quickly un-stuck when necessary.

We cruised down Devils Slide and headed over into Sunbonnet Pass. We came upon a few other rigs in the trail and made passes when we could but also got stuck a few times, and again had to use the winch to get unstuck. Somewhere in Sunbonnet we got lodged between two big rocks and had to use our jack to get out, which cost us a significant amount of time. At that point we also discovered that we had cracked the oil pan again and it is was dripping. We took some time to look at the leak and see if we could spot the crack. We debated continuing the race with the leak but the concern was, if we cracked the oil pan even worse, we could damage the motor and possibly be stuck in a trail until the race is over. We agreed that we would make our way out of Sunbonnet and then reassess the condition of the rig. It’s always a hard decision to make but we had to make it. We decided to make our way to the stock bypass split at RM100 and call the race. We didn’t want to risk severe damage to the motor and didn’t want a late-night team recovery after the race. We got in touch with our pit crew at Remote Pit 2B and had them relay to Race Ops that we were out of the race at RM100.

We finished our race as the 1st place DNF, putting us officially in 4th place by progression. Yes, you read that right — There were only three 4500 class rigs that finished the race, and only another nine rigs in the 4800 class. This race was a difficult one — Not because of the number of rock trails or a difficult desert lap, but because Mother Nature has not rained on the Hammer trails in some time, and that caused the dirt to be very dusty and the rocks to be covered in dust, and some holes to be extra deep.


We would like to give a special thanks to several sponsors – To Off Road Development for providing the shop space for us to get ready for KOH. To Sucuri Security for stepping on board to support the team this year. To Warn for going above and beyond standard customer service to solve our winching issues. To Dust Junkies Racing for providing pit space and pit support at the race. To Lasernut for providing us space in the Laser Town Hanger at KOH. To Rock Krawler for their continued support in our race program. To Falken for providing ZERO flats this year on the Wildpeak M/T tires. And to our DTR team… Without them we would not be able to do what we do. We are a team that is more like a family and we are all in it together. Even though we did not finish, we did not lose. We come away smarter and stronger. We are still a young team and we continue to learn at every race.

Thanks to all of our sponsors for your continued support: Rock Krawler Suspension | Falken Tire | Sucuri Security | Axial Racing | Poison Spyder Customs | Raceline Wheels | DJ Safety | Fuel Safe | Rugged Radios | J. E. Reel | Rugged Routes | Lasernut | Currie Enterprises | Magnaflow | CTM Racing | sPOD | Artec Industries | PRP Seats | Luxwurx | Warn | Sharq Skinz | DGP Motion Media | Factor55 | 212 Performance Gloves | Off Road Development | Pacific Advisors | SoCal Services | Beachview Insurance | Villa Landscape Products | SoCal Land Maintenance | EctoVentures

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Axialfest Adventures – Video Collection


It’s never too early to start thinking about Axialfest. Actually does anyone stop thinking about Axialfest? It can be said for certain that those who have attended Axialfest never forget their time there. If you’re new to the event, then we can get you right up to speed on what experiences you can have there. You’re about to witness a collection of Axialfest videos produced by people who are truly passionate about the radio control hobby and who are now passionate about what goes on at Axialfest. The collection covers some of the best videos posted to Youtube. Not all of the videos, there are certainly many more amazing videos created by attendees that we urge you to hunt for on Youtube, but the videos selected here will get you ramped up for Axialfest 2018 and beyond.

Before we take a look at some of the highlight videos from each year, it is important to know what is Axialfest. This video from the Axialvideos Youtube page gives you the deep down meaning of the event:

AMain Hobbies
AxialFest 2017 by AMain Hobbies
Team AMain Hobbies Presents AxialFest 2017. The crew that attended Axialfest 2017 has put together an amazing presentation of what goes on at the event. Rigs in action, the excitement of the participants the beauty of the setting this video will leave you wanting to see more and attend Axialfest if you don’t already.

4-Days Of AXIALFEST In 16 Minutes – Get In The Know Before You Go
Axialfest can seem overwhelming for the first time attendee, but here each day’s events are broken down so you know what to expect. The elements of Axialfest evolve each year, but this will help you start your journey.

5150 Media Productions
Come Drive With Us – Axialfest
Probably one of the most epic documentary style videos about Axialfest is the 5150 2016 video sponsored by Pro-Line Racing. This finely crafted film gives you the background of Axialfest, what it means to the people that attend it, the grueling terrain both people and Axial rig endure at the amazing grounds of Cisco Grove. Here, you’ll see people come together from all over the world all with one passion, Axial.

2015 (Uploaded in 2018)
This is AxialFest!
Scale Builders Guild
Scale Builders Guild is known for its unique view on the scale and trail community and they took that talented perspective to Axialfest in 2015 to capture some amazing moments. Plenty of action footage was packed into this video and covers all of the special events and terrain you can tackle with your rig.

AxialFest 2014 Highlights
RC Logic
This video takes a good look at the rough terrain your rig can encounter at Cisco Grove and of course the fun you can encounter with the people who attend.

Axialfest 2013
Sometimes it good to look back, way back. This is a look at Axialfest back in 2013 and if you watches the videos above you’ll see some changes in format, but many other things are still common. The love for Axial, friendships, custom built trail rigs, amazing adventures and most importantly the appreciation for the fans.

There are plenty of thrilling moments and messages in those videos. What it’s like to be a part of the Axial lifestyle; to eat, sleep and then work or drive your Axial rig day in and day out. To seek out people just like you who love Axial, who want to build great things, to express yourself through a moving model that will turn heads and then have those people approach you to talk more about your passion. At Axialfest everyone is there to be appreciated by the company Axial, but everyone there appreciates each other for having the same love for Axial radio control vehicles.

2018 Ultra 4 / King of the Hammers






11:00AM – 01:00PM
01:30PM – 02:30PM
03:0OPM – 05:00PM


11:00AM – 01:00PM
01:30PM – 02:30PM
03:0OPM – 05:00PM


11:00AM – 01:00PM
01:30PM – 02:30PM
03:0OPM – 05:00PM




10:00AM – 12:00PM
12:30PM – 06:00PM



SCX10 II Trail Honcho 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD RTR Video Collection

SCX10II_Trail_Honcho_Video Look what’s back, the trail rig that lured so many RC enthusiasts off of the tracks and from backyards to the trails for an off-road adventure. The Trail Honcho again graces the trails, this time with the new SCX10 II platform under the iconic Honcho body. But there is a bit more than meets the eye. The SCX10 II has gone through a few revisions and optimized in a way that still delivers the scale performance enthusiasts desire and now at a price that many will find affordable. The Trail Honcho will get you into the scale off-road scene and the level you take your hobby to is up to you. To get you up to speed on what Youtube’s top influencers are saying about the SCX10 II Trail Honcho, we’ve gathered a collection of videos so you can easily see what these trusted channels have to say about the rig.

Axial Videos

Axial AX90059 SCX10™ II Trail Honcho™ – Hike across Redonda Ridge For the launch, the Axial crew went to great lengths to show you the capability of this new release. The SCX10™ II Trail Honcho™ is the reliable choice for scale trail fun! For the past nine years the SCX10™ has been the staple vehicle platform for scale trail enthusiasts around the world. When it’s you, the trail and your rig, you want the tried, and true. You want real world community tested, hobby shop supported, aftermarket supported with close to ten years of history and scale trail adventures. The Trail Honcho™, built on the SCX10™ II chassis, meets the demands and the rigors of scale trailing miles from home when you need reliability the most! The Redonda Ridge Trail, within the mountains of Big Bear California, is mostly used by off road motorcyclist, and revered as the Malcolm Smith Trail due to it’s technical tenacity. The trail was recently re-visited by one of Axial’s own; part of a crew who had traversed the 9.68 mile OHV trail a few times in the past on motorcycles. The thought came about that it would make for a great SCX10™ proving ground, thus the idea was conceptualized to hike the trail, and put the latest version of the Trail Honcho™ through its paces, to uphold the “Trail Honcho” name by putting it on a “black diamond” trail for full size vehicles. Axial takes toys seriously, plays seriously, and made plans to go the extra mile to showcase the Axial SCX10™ Trail Honcho™ in it’s true, namesake terrain.

Harley Designs

Axial SCX10-2 Trail Honcho RTR AX90059 – First Drive – Pre-Budget Build! Harley Designs has already released a number of videos on the Trail Honcho and detailed  the rig before it was even in his hands in the Budget Build Time! Axial SCX10-II Trail Honcho RTR video. After, he followed up with a first running video during a New Year’s Eve trip. The adventure on the rocks is pretty exciting and filmed from a number of perspectives including some drone shots and backed up with some great music. Harley Designs has also teamed up with Scale Builders Guild for a head to head budget build series on the rig. The number of episodes the Trail Honcho will go through has not yet been announced.

Scale Builders Guild

The Trail Honcho is Back! The Scale Builders Guild drops some knowledge on you about the big changes to the SCX10 II Trail Honcho, first going over the links that so many people are talking about. Mathew of SBG takes and compares an old link to a new link to show the difference between the two. His opinion of the new link? Well, you’ll need to watch it to find out. What we can tease is SBG’s overall opinion: “This is a great entry-level truck to fuel your new RC obsession! It’s got a great price point for an RTR and should be robust enough to tackle any trail.” And finally Mathew goes over a number of other changes to the rig and also talks about the budget build series with Harley Designs, using the Trail Honcho.

Hemistorm RC

LOW BUDGET FUN! – Axial SCX102 Trail Honcho Hemistorm RC dips right into the SCX10 II Honcho and delivers a great overview of the trucks new features and what he likes about the original Honcho. Hemistorm explains that at $329, getting the Axial scale experience with the SCX102 chassis has never been more affordable then it is with the Trail Honcho. He discusses the updates in the axle and link design, along with a the budget friendly Tactic radio. Stiff plastic links, single piece axle housings with a reinforced truss section and the use of the AX10 transmission case offer a solid base, along with all the electronics that we’ve seen proven in the other SCX102 platforms, as the Trail Honcho shares a lot of parts with the other versions, the Cherokees and the CRC JK. His overall opinion? The “Trail Honcho one of the most attractive ready-to-run RC trail trucks.”

Extreme Scale Performance RC

Axial AX90059 SCX10II Trail Honcho UNBOXED! If you like some raw unboxing with some suspension squishing, suspension flexing, tire squishing and even watching someone taking a hit of fresh tire smell, then Extreme Scale Performance has the video for you. CWC goes over all the details from the box to the rig from his side arm cam view. He gives you his deep thoughts and opinions on some of the new parts found on the Trail Honcho SCX10 II platform like the links, axles and transmission set-up. No drive time here, but plenty of detailed honest info.

RC Driver Online

The Honcho Returns! Better & Budget Friendly – Axial SCX10 II Trail Honcho Review This video is a long one folks, RC Driver Online unloads a thorough unboxing video giving you all the details you could possibly want and more about the Honcho. You want to know specifically what it comes with all the way to what changes were made in this specific SCX10 II RTR, it’s here. Then RC Driver goes on to talk about the differences in the Honcho kit in comparison to the two other SCX10 II ready to runs available at this time; the SCX10 II 2000 Jeep Cherokee and the SCX10 II 2017 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited CRC. After that tour, the Trail honcho is taken out for a frigid drive under some bridges in a snow covered park. Then the video is wrapped up with thoughts of the rigs performance. If you want to know everything about the Trail Honcho in one shot, sit back, relax, learn a whole lot and enjoy the drive with RC Driver.

Axialfest 2018 – Get Ready


Since July 2017, Axial drivers across the globe have been waiting for a certain announcement; the dates for Axialfest 2018. Those dates have been released and officially Axialfest 2018 will be held July 18-21st; so hit those calendar apps and save those dates.


If you’ve never been to Axialfest, then there’s no better time than now to save the date, start making plans and get excited for the RC adventure that so many have already experienced and love. To get you going, here are a few great articles and videos to help you prepare and know what goes on at Axialfest.

AXIALFEST 2017: General Info and Code of Conduct


Follow this link HERE  for general information and the code of conduct for the event. Although this is the 2017 article, the 2018 info and conduct code will be similar.



HERE is a great collection of video clips from 2017 that will give you more information and details on what happens at Axialfest.



Long time Axialfest attendee and frequent Axial blogger Skeeno put together a great four part overview of his 2017 experience. You’ll certainly get a lot of details from this read: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4


Want the full scoop in a short amount of time? The video above will give you the full four day run-down of Axialfest in just sixteen minutes. Get In The Know Before You Go!

Start Prepparing
The best advice for going to Axialfest and having a great time is not waiting until the last minute to prepare for the trip and event. Plan your custom builds now and get to work. Or do as many do and show up with a Ready To Run, ready to have fun. Plan out what you’ll wear, what you’ll eat and where you’ll sleep. If you stay off the grounds, you’ll need to find accommodations. Most stay at Cisco Grove Campgrounds, but please wait until an official announcement is made to call the facility to book your camping spot. Now, let the countdown begin to #Axialfest2018!

mAh Per Mile – The Quest To Determine Run Time


If you’ve ever sat around the campfire at an RC event or perhaps camped out with some buddies on an epic multi-day RC trail adventure, you may have heard the tale of “mAh Per Mile.” As the tale goes, a rugged RC adventurer, gear junkie, and as legend has it, talented Global Marketing Director has been spotted wandering some well worn trails through California. The man, well supplied with all the contents needed for a trail hike is on some sort of mission. Passer-bys stare at him in wonder as he trudges through the less taken path, his head down and muttering to himself. What is he saying? What is he doing. On one trail, the Redonda Ridge Trail it was evident things were getting more serious. He now travels in a herd of RC trail adventurers and some of his mutters turned into recognizable phrases. “mAh Per Mile” “mAh Per Mile” he kept repeating.

mAh Battery

What is this “mAh Per Mile?” It actually may be the answer to an age old RC question; “How long will my RC truck run for?” Real cars are rated by miles per gallon to determine how far can you travel. But there hasn’t been anything comparable in the RC world to define how far an RC rig can go. Well, we actually know who that mystery trail adventurer is, it’s Rodney Wills and for the longest time, he’s been determined to deliver answers to some of RC’s important questions and how long can you drive your SCX10 for is one. Rodney is on a mission to put numbers on paper and his quest to do so has been deemed “mAh Per Mile.”

This blog post will serve as an evolving report of a talented Axial team put together by Rodney to determine an answer to the burning question. The team will be testing different batteries, different rigs all in an effort to get out of the office and have fun on the trails. WAIT! I mean test RC equipment for the good of telling you how much time and fun you can get from your Axial adventure machine. Watch the videos and keep checking back to the Axial Blog to see how the science, testing and general goofing off unravels.

mAh Per Mile – Explaining Gas Mileage for Your Rig

There’s one question we hear a lot – how far will your rig go on one battery? To find the answer, we’ve created a little formula; mAh Per Mile. In Part 1 of this series, we break down the ‘how far will it go’ question and fill you in on how we plan to find out using this formula.

mAh Per Mile – Part 2 – Testing Our Mileage on the Trail

In Part 1, we discussed the idea behind mAh Per Mile – how far can your vehicle go on a specified battery pack. In Part 2, we take 3 Axial SCX10 II rigs out (with different electronic setups) to see how far we can go on a 2000mAh LiPo battery. The results are actually quite revealing…

Inside the Largest TTC Event – 2017 Team KNK Hardware TTC 4


Lebanon, Ohio
June 1st – 4th, 2017

How did this sleepy country neighborhood event become the second largest scale trail event in the US of A and the largest TTC event?

$20,000 in prizes
Attendees From 19-states + 2 countries

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To have met Mike Kirby of Team KNK Hardware, it’s easy to understand. He is pure enthusiasm with a whole lot of spice add-on’s like; big hearted, compassionate and driven! And he is doing it all for the right reasons, to bring awareness and grow his segment of choice in the hobby industry. He knows that in order for his company to succeed, he needs the upper end of the food chain to succeed and he is going to great length’s in order to do so. On top of it all, he is going about it the long hard way; do events, promote the activity, hope people come, have fun, tell friends, purchase vehicles, get more involved, want to build, need screws to build with, thus purchase KNK Hardware. That is serious long term investment and commitment. For Kirby, it’s just hard work for something he believes in building on his 35+ years of being an R/C enthusiast!

Luckily for Axial we fall into his radar, with our attention on the scale trail segment, we gain a partnership in KNK Hardware with their events aligning with our like-minded mission. We share the mission to bring awareness to the scale trail segment.

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While we all love our fun trail runs, events are simply the best way to effect change and awareness on a more grand scale. Events brings the potential added bonus of more exposure. Events potentially bring a larger group of people together and result into “communities” that share a common bond that naturally wants to grow and share the fun.

Scale trail runs by nature are very organic, held outside of the common driver stand / designated purpose built courses. But Mike wanted to bring a bit of that back into the scale trail segment because, while the grandiose trails of AXIALFEST are just that, they are not permanent, not easily accessible, only held once a year and 3,000 miles away from Kirby’s backyard!

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Mike has his own ideas and wanted to transform his backyard into the ultimate playground for scale trail enthusiast in his area. Kirby’s vision was a bit more than most, he wanted something more permanent, something he could keep building upon. At the same time, his playground is something of a testing ground as he knows very well from his racing days, it’s all about steering wheel time VS just purchasing the latest greatest perceived performance advantage.

In June 7-10 of 2015, just after two in business, Mike and Amberly Kirby held their first event on their 14-acre property, to include camping space and their idea of what they wanted to see in a scale trail Tough Truck Challenge facility.

What sets Kirby’s course apart from the rest is his layout of the trails with separate or detached groomed walking area’s that are wheel chair accessible, kid and family friendly.

With all this attention to detail for the enthusiast, Mike knows the number one issue with competition based scale trail events is looking after the trail itself.

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It’s one thing to have natural trail degradation due to a 10lbs vehicle throttle jockeying up the rocks, shuffling the deck with 4600Kv on 6S, that’s motorsports! (insert Dan Wilson’s motto “power solves everything, just add more!”)

But add a foot print or bumped rock by a 100+ pound individual and a trail could be blown! The scale gods would frown as no proof has been made to big foots actual existence (debatable, but for all intended purposes). If such happened in the middle of a competition, it would change everything and it has happened.

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Kirby saw the separation of driver and rig simply as the only solution to provide the best competitive platform possible, thus the KNK Farm with its unique features was constructed and continues development. Like when his son, Gavin age 7, says “Dad, let’s make this bridge that walks up and around and back down the tree!” Kirby obliges, keeping the whole family involved.

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While the competitive spirit runs very strong within Mike’s DNA, Kirby also knows the offroad enthusiast is very community driven and that aligns well with Mike’s super family friendly environment. We are in his backyard, we are his guest, so it’s his rules, his family’s playground we’ve been invited over to play on his playground. It’s not a race track, it’s not a park, it’s Mike and Amberly Kirby’s personal backyard.

Come as guest, leave as friends, but help clean up after ourselves so we can continue the greatest family gatherings east of the Mississippi!

CLICK The Picture Below To Scroll Through The Event Photo Gallery:
2017 Team KNK Hardware TTC4 - AXIAL

Hiking the Redonda Ridge with an SCX10 Trail Honcho

Hiking the  Redonda Ridge with an SCX10 Trail Honcho

Words & Photos: Rodney “GCRad1″ Wills

Hopefully you’ve read the lead-up stories:
Planning a SCX10 Hike over Redonda Ridge OHV Trail 1W17
Getting There – SCX10 Hike Over Redonda Ridge – Big Bear, California
 Axial AX90059 SCX10 II™ Trail Honcho 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – RTR

All the planning is sorted, now we are about to do this thing! We wake up early, I think my alarm went off at 6:00am. Didn’t sleep that well, I think I was too excited.
Too much planning made for too much anticipation.
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It’s Wednesday Morning, October 25th, and I get myself physically prepared; Altra Lone Peak 3.0 Trail shoes, Stance Training Crew socks and Hammer Nutrition Endurolytes for cramp prevention as its going to be a warm day.
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I load the beloved SCX10 Trail Honcho into my ADV80 and we get ready to depart camp and make our way down to the the start of the trail just past Crab Flats Campground. We will start here (Google Map Link) at the Redonda Ridge 1W17 trail marker sign. Four of us will be walking the trail and John Schultz and ScottG will be taking the two vehicles back to camp awaiting our return to camp later this afternoon – evening.
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Last minute morning bits; I get my water bladder filled and of course I have my Hammer Nutrition Heed pre-mix going!
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John Schultz hooked me up! I have a magnetized hood so I don’t loose my body clips!
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Rather simple and rather simple silly cool! Schultz learned it from somewhere and we will make a little blog about it at a later date.
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Load in the first battery and mark the time of start.
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OFFICIAL START: 9:05am Wednesday October 25th, 2017
Axial Trail Honcho Hike Over Redonda Ridge OHV Trail 1W17 is now underway!!!Redonda Ridge Planning-7
This first portion of trail is actually down hill. Everyone is in good spirits!
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I can’t help it, I shoot photos of everything… even the trees. And the landscape! I love the textures and the colors. I’ve been known to “#textures” on my IG before. I can hear my buddy Jarod DeAnda laughing now, “your and your #texture hashtag.”
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Big Bear is a mix or a transitional point from the desert to the mountains, depending on your location on the mountain, you can get a mix of cactus and pine trees of which we will see both today along ridge route to Big Pine Flats.
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The SCX10 Trail Honcho doing what its suppose to do, trailing along.
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Still working our way down hill.
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The sun is warming up quickly, but luckily we still have some shade as we make our way down to the creek, but once over we are fully exposed and will be in “up hill mode!”
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Trails crossing… should put us right about here on Google Maps.

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Keep on mini truckin’ hehehe That’s funny! I know all the GMC dude’s rock the #TinyTrucks tag. I’m an og Mini-Truckin’ dude! I’m going to see if I can dig that old hat out!
We might upset some folks… hehehe
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BRAAAP! off the air craft landing strip shrapnel – the OG Sand Ladder aka Marston Mat. Know your overland-spec history yo! Look it up!
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We are almost to the creek crossing, more like stream crossing, but it is coming up soon.Redonda Ridge Planning-28
I’m usually the one hauling the video camera on these missions so it’s a bit strange for me to see my colleagues carrying the gear.
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It’s been at least a month since my previous crossing and the water level is going down quickly.
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Anthony Rivas got roped into hiking this trip with us and he is doing what he does best, directing some social media shots!
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Hey look! It’s not me on the vid-cam, it’s Scott Roberts doing the video camera action! While most people don’t see or know much about this man right here, he has worked here at Axial with me since 2011. Everything you see visually from Axial basically comes from this man or at least across his desk.
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We crossed over it at the creek crossing, the PCT runs along it through here making yet another appearance in my face! It keeps calling me… But not a full blown thru-hike, maybe just the SoCal weekend section hiking…
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The SCX10 Trail Honcho looks down on the PCT like, “I got this!”
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Who is a fan of desert tan, green eggs and ham mixed with DJ Red Alert.
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Since we left the creek crossing it has become very apparent that THE ASCENT IS ON!
The trail surface to this point has been mostly course sand mixed DG based.
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But as we continue on and up, rocks are starting to litter the trail.
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Also too, after the creek crossing, we are out of the tree cover and exposed to the sun.

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The crew said there was suppose to be a picnic table set up at this GPS point location. Something about pre-paid Amazon air drone delivery service…
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I keep on trucking as I want to get the SCX10 Trail Honcho into rockier conditions!
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The crew finally gives up in protest about the picnic table. “We are canceling our PayPal payment!” The sun laughs and turns up the temperature and add some incline for good measure.
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See! Cactus… on the edge of the forest!
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At the one shade spot…
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We see deer tracks.
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Little ones…Redonda Ridge Planning-51
Hey guys, where you at?
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Carrying on our climb dance!
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Climbing… It’s what the SCX10 Trail Honcho eats for breakfast.
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Climbing… It’s what the SCX10 Trail Honcho dream about before breakfast. Redonda Ridge Planning-59
Climbing… It’s what the SCX10 Trail Honcho does at high noon.
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Climbing… It’s what the SCX10 Trail Honcho does just for fun!
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We make the first major climb for what seems like two hours straight…
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but we finally reach a little plato of earth… Redonda Ridge Planning-67 Redonda Ridge Planning-68
POSER SHOTS! Scroll back up three images…. The guys are asking if the trail goes up over those hills.. “The trail looks like it goes over…” I ignore or I think I said, “yea, naa, I think it cuts around to the right out of sight… Time to roll!”
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From our moment of flat perch, we get to see down this little canyon and its cool to see the small batches of trees. Feels like some wilderness to me!  Redonda Ridge Planning-71
“Therezzz GOLD IN DEM DAR HILLS!!! FOOLS GOLD YO!!!” I gotta’keep the spirits high!
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It’s cool to see the terrain change.
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More #texture change.
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I think this is my favorite shot of the trip. I saw the setting as I was walking up to the crest, stopped, snapped one photo and said, “Yep! Leave it chance and see how the “film” comes out!” Came out all right…
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As the SCX10 Trail Honcho takes in the view, I check the spot to see what it looks like from the front. It’s not as cool of a shot but see that trail we are coming up! Yes sir, we are doing this thing!
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I circle back around to verify the animal footprints. Small one here, but I did see some larger “kitty cat” prints earlier, most  likely a healthy bobcat.
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The Axial SCX10 Trail Honcho is its proper surroundings.
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Trail Honcho bossing the moto trail, but the gnar lay ahead.Redonda Ridge Planning-83
I nicknamed this “scary bush.” Especially if we was coming through here at night.
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The tree is still wearing it’s charred skin from the Butler Peak fire of which I think was back in 2007.
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Did I ever tell you that I actually like shooting photos? But just look at that trail! It’s an “ALL BRAAAP!” section! But wait…
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Now we are getting into some gnar! It’s not easy to get a 2D photo to show the dynamic perspective of hills and their steepness, but take note of Scott Roberts walking ahead, you get a little since of the angle here.
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Maybe this will give you a perspective… Rest stop! SR & Rivas taking a breather, because they can see what lays ahead… ANOTHER HILL!Redonda Ridge Planning-91
The Trail Honcho is upholding it’s SCX10 heritage and just eats up each mile regardless of steepness.
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Meanwhile the steepness is eating up my crew. “Look SR, we have to climb that hill, that other hill behind that and then that other one way back there…”
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Kinda’ spectacular out here!
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Interesting how the cross section view of this tree’s rings looks like four trees in one.
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The SCX10 Trail Honcho just churning out the climbs.
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This trail has obviously been here for a while and been well “knobby traveled” but you have to wonder, who did it first? Who cut this trail? Was it an Indian foot path before? One day I need to stop into Malcolm Smith Motorsports and ask Malcolm directly as this trail is called the Malcolm Smith Trail. But there is very little historical information about this trail online.Redonda Ridge Planning-99
Same photo as the one preceding this one, but I wanted to show the ridge of which we traveled. We’re kinda’ out here! Yes, civilization is just over the mountain the in the background, but your still out here… We haven’t seen anyone else all day… and I like that.
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The SCX10 Trail Honcho takes the hard line just for fun I however will walk the easy path.
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More gnar please.

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The SCX10 Trail Honcho FINALLY runs out of gas! It would… just feet from a nice shady flat area.
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Good thing I have my Schizzle-magnets! I’m a fan! Thanks John!
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Battery #2 loaded and battery #1 marked with the elapse time.Redonda Ridge Planning-108
Just a few more feet and my view looks like this and I join the crew in the shade.
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While I’ve been self-fueling all along, we take a static moment to enjoy our nutrition bars.
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Time to roll!
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With another crest of a hill reveals another view!
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And then more climbing!!!
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While spectacular, the views keep showing those climbs… Redonda Ridge Planning-116
Here you get a little sense of the climb as you can see the crew pushing on.
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I like this shot! I think it shows a bit more of the hill but the view is spectacular!
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But the climb has a summit and a summit reveals more.. See that little trail thread? Talk about onion layers! Redonda Ridge Planning-122
We take a moment in the shade.
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I know you guys are on the Altra Trail Running shoe tip, but are you on the Trial Gator tip? I’m diggin my shoe gators! As goofy looking as they are, they’re total function! With the small gravel-DG-dirt, the gators are perfect for keeping all that stuff out of my shoes!
Get some!

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SCX10 Trail Honcho is back in the trail saddle.
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The sun is starting to throw the long shadows…Redonda Ridge Planning-125
The team is working to push themselves forward as elevation and the rate of steepness has not given in!
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We start to get into another step section, but its been steep all along. I guess it’s more like a steep chute.
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ou sorta’ get a sense of steepness from this view, but regardless I’m just shooting it for the view, the memory, the way the sun is flaring.
Just as I drop the camera back to my side, I’m having to get after this little section. I actually start to wonder if I can actually make this section! I won’t say I am nervous yet as I know I can trail blaze the SCX10 Trail Honcho around if I have to, but it will be limited space to do so. I stay in the trough or chute of a trail and work the rig through the boulder and then in the deep heavy granular sand or DG – decomposed granite. The combination of having to use wheel speed to push up hill in the DG while also the tires dig down and find bite on the rocks below… I hear it… Wait, what? I don’t want to hear that!!!
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After we diagnose the issue, Tony takes my tools and jumps into action so I can
document the wrench action.
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Again, dig the magnet trick as we can drop the screws here on the underside and the body clips are on the top side.
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As suspected, idler gear gone fishing for the afternoon.
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We fish out what debris we can in preparation to install a new gear.  Redonda Ridge Planning-128g
We install a metal idler gear Mr. AX31585 Redonda Ridge Planning-128h
Field repair is almost complete!
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Buttoning it all back together and we will be back in action in moments!

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Now we are back in action and started where we pulled off and it’s the start of
the nasty climbs!
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As you can see, there is a cleaner easier path to take, but what is the fun in that?!
I came here to put the rig through its paces on the rugged trail of the Redonda Ridge.
I could have just stayed home and drove circles around in the parking lot, but that is not my idea of fun! Being out here is fun, while it is both grueling on my body and the SCX10 Trail Honcho. But it’s worth it as it’s an additional layer of testing.Redonda Ridge Planning-131
These climbs also showcase some scenic views!
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Photos never seem to capture the true steepness of a hill, but looking at ScottR and Rivas as they make their way up, shows a bit of how steep this section truly is. When I begin to question if I will be able to drive a section due to the steepness, I really start looking creative driving lines!  Redonda Ridge Planning-134a
When you see motorcycle parts on the ground, you know its a tough section.
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But we are “still not out of the woods” yet, insert “rocks” in place of woods. Yes, we are still in the woods, with rocks strewn about! hehehe   Redonda Ridge Planning-138
Rivas making his way up. The team has come to the conclusion that there is no end in hills, they just keep rolling at us. Only to discover around each bend, more hill!
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And more hill it is!
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The lighting from the sun is just awesome! We are within the “golden hour” and I could sit on this hillside and shoot till dark!
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But, I only snap off a couple and keep moving as I knew we have at least a mile or two further to go and we will be hiking in the dark.
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The sun is is about to drop behind the mountains and the ground bush on our mountain is blocking some of that light, but we finally made it through that section! Redonda Ridge Planning-143  Redonda Ridge Planning-145
You just want a lounge chair and a big dinner as this is the perfect wide-screen!
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But we must keep going, the SCX10 Trail Honcho marches on!Redonda Ridge Planning-147
Another big boulder garden! Who plants these things?!
Who would want these things to grown like this?
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The SCX10 Trail Honcho makes no worries of such matters and see’s only the playground in mother nature’s garden of rocks.  Redonda Ridge Planning-150
WHAT?! A moment of downhill or even flatness is a happy moment!

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Only to be defused by another uphill climb as Tony makes more reveling with his headlamp that we will be engulfed by darkness on the backside of this climb.
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Everyone is beat tired, but the view is magical.
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Battery change time!
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There is both excitement and angst in the air from the crew. The hills are behind us, the darkness is ahead of us.

Maybe the last climb? Redonda Ridge Planning-172
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Hike team headlamps streaking by.Redonda Ridge Planning-174
The SCX10 Trail Honcho awaits the last of the team to pass for the final view of darkness and the final decent to the trail gate at Crab Flats. The end is near, just ahead down a dark mountainside with ZERO moon light. We make our way down and ScottG is awaiting us, with lights on in the rig, we can see how much further we have and the excitement builds for the team!  “GET US OFF THIS TRAIL!” is what a think I heard! Redonda Ridge Planning-181
WE ARE HERE – WE ARE HERE – WE ARE HERE!!!Redonda Ridge Planning-184
We extract the third and final battery out of the SCX10 Trail Honcho and mark the times.

OFFICIAL FINISH: 7:30PM Wednesday October 25th, 2017

Total mileage: 9.68 mile / Total Elapse Time: 10-hrs & 25-mins
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This trip epic, awesome, fun, grueling and was a big learning curve!
The crew will forever remember this trip! Redonda Ridge Planning-185
That’s a wrap! Spark Arresters Required!

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Back at camp, ScottG aka “BKGriller” makes HAMBURGERS for the HUNGRY!!!

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[L2R] Tony Phalen (cam-2), ScottR (cam-1), Rodney Wills (SCX10 Pilot), John Schultz (team basecamp & rig prep), Anthony Rivas of Rivas Concepts (guest & social documentary) ScottG (team basecamp & trail transpo & chief).

See the rig:
Axial AX90059 SCX10 II™ Trail Honcho 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – RTR

Planning a SCX10 Hike over Redonda Ridge OHV Trail 1W17
Getting There – An SCX10 Hike Over Redonda Ridge
Axial AX90059 SCX10 II™ Trail Honcho 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – RTR
About the Author: Redonda Ridge Planning-191
Rodney Wills may not have been born with a silver spoon in his mouth, but he was more than compensated for it by being able to grow up behind the wheel. At eight years old he started driving heavy equipment on his uncle’s farm. Flouting child labor laws, his uncle would put him to work; he would get him started and jump off the tractor, and have Rodney cut and plow fields. The uncle found Rodney a willing employee. Now, while he did not engage in any tractor races, the seed had been planted (literally); the passion for driving already raced through his veins.

Later on in Alabama, Rodney would drive his father’s old pickup truck. As young teenagers sometimes do, he would sneak the truck out to splash in the mud on the local country back roads. Rodney did not limit himself to four-wheel rides, however. Motorcycles were always apart of family life and Rodney had started riding at age five. Racing came at age six on the dirt oval flat track at Talladega. Trail riding was an everyday thing in the backyard woods and local mountains.

Magazines would introduce Rodney to skateboarding and then BMX in 1977. Normal by today standards but then in rural Alabama, Rodney was way ahead of his peers. Just like his hobbies, his life went in the order of Art, Music, and Cars. His passions led him to the California College of Arts and Crafts after two years at the Atlanta College of Arts and Crafts. After achieving a bachelors degree of art in graphic design, Rodney went on to work ten years in the snow, skate and surf industry through his art, working for the famous O’Neill wetsuit company. Next came music as the art director for the car audio speaker manufacturer Image Dynamics. That led to Rodney starting the import car culture lifestyle magazine, TMRm’zine [1996-2000]. This magazine put the “lifestyle” label on the import market that has now grown to enormous proportions in the automotive industry. For the next 10-years Rodney worked in magazine publishing. During a meeting between colleagues, Wills was helping an event promoter make his event better, which lead to a more in-depth connection to the R/C industry pulling Rodney in to work for HPI Racing [2006-2010]. Since 2010, Rodney has worked for Axial as Global Marketing Director coming up with wacky ideas such as this.

Getting There – An SCX10 Hike Over Redonda Ridge

Words & Photos: Rodney Wills

Hopefully you’ve read these previous blog posts, building into a little mini-series adventure story:
Planning a SCX10 Hike over Redonda Ridge OHV Trail 1W17
 Axial AX90059 SCX10 II™ Trail Honcho 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – RTR

Logistics logistics logistics, what do you mean the log is tics?
Who said tics? What log is full of tics?! Get the gas! I’m bringing bug spray! Who’s got grey spray paint?! “Logisticmundo’s” will NOT be televised on Telemundo at 7:00pm to protect the innocent of the children. Does that mean that it’s logical to just use bondo?

The logistics of looking after your crew is like looking after your kids!  Add in adventure and the stakes increases six-fold. No, not the ones on the grill, the risk-factor! In all seriousness, six persons coming from six different directions and we only need-want two vehicles for our mission, this requires some sorting the details out! We will actually have three vehicles in use for this trip; ScottG is picking up ScottR, Rivas is driving to Schultz’s house and riding with him and I am picking up Tony Phalen from his house. No, ScottK is not on this trip as he is holding down the office-fort. Three “Scott’s” one office, I got it sorted! “G-K-R!” What we will be doing is traveling from our six personal locations and all descending onto a camp location nestled north west of Big Bear lake called Big Pine Flats.
This area was chosen as discussed in this previous blog post: Planning a SCX10 Hike over Redonda Ridge OHV Trail 1W17 (Hence the mild suggestion, “Hopefully you’ve read these previous blog post…”). All kidding aside, lets get on with this operation!

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We are traveling along the 91-FWY just before the HWY-241, the area where the Canyon Fire broke out and took some homes.
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The burned homes are visibly up on our right, but what I was looking at was the “burn-dust” coming across the hills as the wind is still blowing strong. We’ve seen our fair share of fires in southern California and as I put the finishing touching on this  (December 12th, 2017)  “At 230,000 acres, Thomas fire is now the fifth-largest wildfire in modern California history” as reported by the Los Angeles Times. Needless to saw, we will have a watchful eye when we are in the woods.

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We are all traveling from three different directions to the mountain. While in route, Tony and myself were having a good chat and I drove right past my exit as my brain was thinking I was driving to King of the Hammers. Guess what we was talking about… The first two guesses don’t count. We wound up coming in the same way and meeting on the road Schultz & Rivas.
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Our meeting point before going into the woods is the Deep Creek Drive-In Restaurant in Running Springs, California, serving Burgers, Taco’s and BREAKFAST!
The last meal… It’s the joke of the morning. Redonda Ridge Planning-5
I’m enjoying my morning coffee…Redonda Ridge Planning-7
in good company with (L-R) ScottG, ScottR, Anthony Rivas, Tony Phalen, Rodney Wills (me) and John Schultz.
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We are packed into these three rigs; the #ADV80, the #XJSchizzle and the #SHTFV.
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What would be funny is all six in one!On our way into Green Valley Lake, we see this rig up for sale. But someone had to go off and buy a 6X6 instead.

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Poser shots of the ADV80 at the intersection of Holcomb Creek, Pacific Crest Trail, 3N16 and 3N93 Google Maps Link to this spot. This dang PCT trail just keeps talking to me! While the thought of through-hiking it is everyone’s dream, it’s truly that, a dream.
Book- Hiking the Pacific Crest Trail- Southern California by Shawnté Salabert
BUT, we can weekend section-hike southern California section of the Pacific Crest Trail! Thus, I have recently purchased the book Hiking the Pacific Crest Trail: Southern California by Shawnté Salabert.

On with the show:
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The crew coming up from the Holcomb Creek / PCT crossing towards the Big Pine Flats Area. The “Family” campground there is closed for the winter season, but I didn’t want to stay in there anyhow.
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I like camp spots that are as remote as can be, but for this trip I need convenience as the trail that we will be hiking ends near by. This is YP #7.
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We make camp on this small hill top just off the road.
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Tents are located as best possible out of the wind.
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But those RTT guys throw caution out with the wind just toss it up where’evz!
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The XJSCHIZZLE remote R/C pit-camp compound with included RTT overland-spec kit with ground anchors. Note that license plate…
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SR looks on and informs us we are doing it all wrong! This needs to be drilled and hollowed out of the rock, add the front porch and fireplace here please.
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Camp GCRad1, I try to be the minimalist of the bunch.

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Granite’s got grip! At least I hope it’s granite, I’m no geo-rock-hound, but we are hound dogging this rock with the SCX10 Deadbolt with a game of RC horse of course!
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The game play rules are simple. One rig, everyone gets a chance on the wheel. Roll-3, pass the wheel. Follow the leader, standard issue camp-rules.
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ScottG – still got game! Look at that concentration! This is serious! Big bragging rights are on the line! The fun of R/C – this is as PURE AS IT GETS!

The wind was a bit howling as the night set in. It was a bit cold and no fires were allowed at this time due to the high wind. With the recent fires we just had, we didn’t want to contribute to the destruction so we didn’t have a camp fire. Bit of a spoiler. We went to bed early thinking we would get some sleep and awake early, charged and ready for tomorrows pursuit….Redonda Ridge Planning-36
WRONG! 1:00am and EVERYONE IS AWAKE and crawling out of their tents.

The wind had died down by this time, but we were still awake.
We mill about in camp for a short bit, raid the snacks and back off to bed.
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I snap off a couple of long exposure with the camera sitting on whatever was available to hold it steady enough.Redonda Ridge Planning-38
Time to try and get some sleep! I think the anticipation in killing me!

Planning a SCX10 Hike over Redonda Ridge OHV Trail 1W17
 Axial AX90059 SCX10 II™ Trail Honcho 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – RTR