The Perfect Fit: SORRCA Class 1 Ready SCX10 / SCX10 II | PART 4: BODY

AX17_SCX10_II_SORRCA_CLASS_part4

We left you hanging there in Part 3 didn’t we? We tell you not to modify the body and then tell you about a follow up blog on Body Mods. Well, here we are to show you a little can be done and some things to completely steer clear from doing. SORRCA in efforts to keep rigs on the trail in a recognizable scale form has determined performance gaining modifications like boat siding and sectioning bodies will not be permitted within the Class 1 rules. Here are some details to consider when preparing your Axial SCX10 or SCX10 II for a SORRCA event.

FOCUS 4: BODY MODS

SORRCA Rule • Boat sides are not allowed.

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The flat sides of the SCX10™ II 2017 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited CRC edition conform to the SORRCA rule set.

Ok Gilligan, you can’t modify your ship in order to run it ashore. Boat siding is a process in which the lower rocker panel and sometime door area is bent to an inward facing angle. This is done to help gain body ground clearance and also allow the body to glide over rocks and obstacles rather than possibly getting hung up. The angle of the modified panel simulates the angled hull of the boat which is how the name came about. All of Axial’s bodies from the 2000 Jeep® Cherokee, to the 2012 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon and even the new 2017 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited CRC all have body sides perpendicular to the ground and fit within the rules. Resist the urge to tweak your Axial body with a pair of seaming pliers and you’re good to go.


 

SORRCA Rule  • Any removal of material from behind the front wheel well (except trim/molding) is considered a boat side.

Cutting the body along the red line would be considered 'Boat Siding."

Cutting the body along the red line would be considered ‘Boat Siding.”

Put the scissors down and step away from the body. It is ok to trim your fender flares or molding from the body, but in doing so, make certain not to remove material from the fender on an angle greater than the removed flare. Simply altering the angle of the wheel-well opening is considered boat siding and can gain an advantage on the trail as well as take away from the scale look SORRCA is trying to maintain. 


 

SORRCA Rule • Sectioning or narrowing of the body is not allowed.

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Sectioning and narrowing a body, although more commonly practiced on ABS hardbodies because they are easier to glue back together is a way to reduce the chances of the body hanging up on rocks and obstacles. In this practice you are physically taking material away from the body in order to gain precious clearance that can help you gain an advantage. In doing so, you take away from the realistic scale appearance of a factory look.

 

GET SORRCA READY
If you are looking for every advantage possible during a SORRCA event, running factory Axial bodies with minor tweaks is an advantage. Consider the lightweight Lexan SCX10 II Jeep Cherokee XJ or Jeep Rubicon or Jeep Wrangler Unlimited with the flares removed. This will give you additional wheel clearance that could make a difference on the trails. On to Part 5; bed time…

The Perfect Fit: SORRCA Class 1 Ready SCX10 / SCX10 II | PART 3: BODY

AX17_SCX10_II_SORRCA_CLASS_part3

Onto part Three of our SCX10 and SCX10 II SORRCA fitment guide and in this installment, we’re going to talk about the body. We’ve seen many builders get creative with Axial bodies, turning them from clear Lexan shells into unique scale masterpieces. Of course being unique is what sets you and your rig apart from others, but in SORRCA’s Class 1 guidelines, it appears it should be done in a way that maintains a realistic scale look.

FOCUS 3: BODY
SORRCA Rule • Bodies should be mounted in a realistic position in relation to the chassis (like a 1:1 would be).

SORRCA 3

Well, if you thought you were going to shift a cab body all the way to the back of your rig like some George Barris creation, it may not fly under SORRCA rules. The rule is pretty self explanatory, the body should be placed in a realistic position. Axial’s SCX10 II with XJ body fits in these rules as long as you follow the body instructions on the kit version or leave your RTR as is. Axial’s other body offerings on the SCX10 chassis can easily fit these rules as long as your imagination doesn’t go too far off track during your build.


 

SORRCA Rule • Vehicle must have a windshield that fills the entire windshield frame.

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You’re in luck, every Axial body comes with a windshield and as long as you don’t go wielding your rotary tool or hack at the windshield with your scissors in some sort of jaws of life incident, passing this rule should be a breeze. The SCX10 II XJ has a full windshield, the Wrangler Rubicon, full windshield, you get the idea.


 

SORRCA Rule • The vehicles body must be mostly intact. Only mild trimming is allowed, such as removing: flairs, trim, molding & a hardtop. If the hardtop is removed, a full interior is required (no extreme trimming of bodies allowed)

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Let’s face it, customizing your rig is one of the best parts of the scale model scene, but SORRCA wants to see your modifications done within reason. The key here is to be scale and of course rigs like the SCX10 II Jeep XJ, Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon fall right into place with the scale rules. If you do choose to run the Unlimited Wrangler Rubicon body, it can be used with or without the cap. The Rubicon’s molded interior qualifies as a full interior. The XJ has a full roof, so of course it doesn’t need an interior unless you add one. If however you do want to chop the top or even add scale points, you can get creative and used an interior chopped out of the Rubicon body as the interior for your XJ. Is it an replica interior? Obviously no, but it is an interior option that can be utilized. Remember, one of the best parts of scale crawling is using your imagination and craftsmanship.

GET SORRCA READY
There are always some that want to twist or bend the rules and we understand the urge. It is those what if’s that can really help make your rig into something that stands out from the rest and may perform better too. But SORRCA’s intent is obvious, the RC trails should be filled with vehicles that look scale in Class 1. Next up in our SORRCA fitment guide; Body Mods. Wait what? We just told you not to modify the body. Stay tuned!

The Perfect Fit: SORRCA Class 1 Ready SCX10 / SCX10 II | PART 2: EXTERNAL ACCESSORIES

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In part two of our SCX10 and SCX10 II SORRCA fitment guide, we’re going to talk external accessories. These are the scale items that are on the outside of the truck that enhance the scale look of the machine like the bumpers and sliders. We know there are plenty of tricks and techniques to do to these components to help improve performance, but remember SORRCA is about scale, so these parts have to follow specific requirements to fit within the rules for competition.

 

Axial SCX10 II Fits SORRCA

FOCUS 2: EXTERNAL ACCESSORIES
SORRCA Rule • Full width bumpers are required on the front and rear of the vehicle. Bumpers that are molded into the body qualify. A rear bumper is not required on a flatbed, but adding one to the flatbed will gain the additional scale points. (Bumpers are measured from the outsides and must be the width of your windshield).

Axial SCX10 II Fits SORRCA

Once again, the Axial SCX10 II with XJ body fits right into SORRCA rules as both its front and rear full width bumpers exceed the width of the windshield. The SCX10 Rubicon however has a front bumper that is narrower than the windshield. If you plan on using the Rubicon and have already updated your right with the CMS as discussed in Part 1 of our SORRCA series, you’ll have to hunt down a bumper option such as the  Scale Front Plate Bumper Set (AX80039A) or the JCROffroad Vanguard Front Bumper (AX31392).
By SORRCA rules, bumpers molded into the body are also considered a legal bumper so if you need to fit your existing rig into this rule, you may want to consider a new body such as the 2015 Ram 2500 Power Wagon® Body (AX31132) or Jeep NuKizer 715 Body (AX31267). These two bodies have both the front and rear bumpers molded into the body and they fit the windshield width rule.

 

SORRCA Rule • Sliders must run parallel to the factory rocker bottom.

Axial SCX10 II Fits SORRCA

Many drivers modify their sliders and place them on an angle with the front of the slider being higher than the rear in efforts to glide over obstacles easier. This doesn’t conform to SORRCA rules, however if you are using the complete factory slider set-up on Any Axial SCX10 or SCX10 II without modification, your sliders will be parallel to the factory rockers on your body when it is mounted level.

GET SORRCA READY

The SCX10 II fits right into SORRCA’s rules pertaining to the bumper and sliders as long as you run your rig as it arrives from the factory. The venerable SCX10 too can easily be brought up to spec with off the shelf parts from Axial. But we have more to cover. Check back for Part 3 of our SORRCA fitment series where we discuss rules for the body.

 

The Perfect Fit: SORRCA Class 1 Ready SCX10 / SCX10 II | PART 1: CHASSIS

The scale truck world is getting pretty intense with clubs popping up everywhere you turn, social media loaded with builds of incredible rigs and more organized competitions than ever before. Axial has always delivered the perfect platform for you to build the rig you envision, but we want to show you just how capable a stock SCX10 II is and how it fits into the SORRCA rule set. What’s SORRCA? It’s an organization that has come together to provide a standardized rule set for everyone to follow. In the rules, they have broken down what you can and can’t do to your vehicle depending on the class you want to compete in. Individual rules for Class 1, Class 2 and Class 3 trucks can be found on sorcca.com. But here we’re going to show you how an Axial SCX10 fits right in and what you use from Axial to build a rule abiding scale machine to dominate on the trails and rack up those scale points at a SORRCA based event near you.

 

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FOCUS 1: CHASSIS

SORRCA Rule • Vehicle must utilize a Chassis Mounted Steering (CMS) setup.
SCX10 CMS
The SCX10 II kit and SCX10 II Ready To Run both fit right into this rule of having the servo mounted to the chassis, this is a standard feature from the factory. It is not however on the first generation SCX10; the steering is mounted on the axle. Have an SCX10? Don’t worry, you can convert your truck to CMS using the parts list shown below or source an alternate aftermarket option.
SCX10 CMS Conversion List:
AX31388  SCX10 II Battery Tray
AX31387  SCX10 II Servo Mounts
AX31386  SCX10 II Frame Braces
AXA114  M3x8mm Hex Socket Button Head
AX31373  M2.6x8mm Hex Socket Button Head
AX31423  Threaded Aluminum Link 7.5×56.5mm
AX31343  M4x20mm Set Screw
AX31186  M4 Rod End Set
AX80018  Hardware Parts Tree

SORRCA  Rule • Vehicle must run a full length rail chassis
Axial Frame Rail SORRCA
Either the SCX10 or SCX10 II frame rail conforms to the ruling as long as the frame rail remains the factory length. If you have bobbed the bed of your body and cut back the chassis rails to fit under the body, this would not be acceptable to the rule. If you’ve cut your rails from the cab back and fabbed on a flatbed or tube bed, this isn’t going to work either. Keep those rails as they came from the factory.

SORRCA Rule • *For 2018, you will be required to run a metal rail chassis AND parallel skid plate in class
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Both the SCX10 and SCX10 II come with a metal channel rail chassis and factory skid plate that is parallel to the chassis. Some available aftermarket parts allow you to angle the skid, but the factory skid and chassis rails conform to the rules.

GET SORRCA READY
The chassis rules are fairly simple and the SCX10 II fits right in. We know there are plenty of SCX10 owners out there and the parts list above will help you get your vehicle up to date to fit within Class 1. Our next focus will be on External Accessories such as Bumpers and Sliders, be sure to follow the Axial blog daily for updates.

Trail Time Never Ends – Installing LED’s For The Daylight Savings Switch

Deadbolt_led_ina_deadbolt

Two times a year something called Daylight Savings Time really messes with me and so many others. Sure there is a good side of some additional sleep in the Fall, but that kick back in Spring is really like a kick in the… let’s skip that. Daylight savings came about as a way to give people more usable working hours as the earth’s axis tilts between seasons which in turn affects daylight time. The practice of DST was also used to conserve power before recent efficient household products came to market.
We’re not here to give you a whole history lesson, we’re here to tell you that this Daylight Savings Time is once again about to encroach upon your trail time and of course we cannot have that! Typically during the Fall Daylight Saving Shift, many lose out on wheel time, the skies darken and that evening run after work, school or other activity gets sidelined. Rigs get shelved and sit begging for use until the next DST shift. Well it’s time to break that cycle!

Axial Night Run Open

Many trail events have incorporated a evening or night trail run. At Axialfest, the night runs are among the most popular trail times and drivers will flood the trails until the sun rises in the mornings. These evening adventurers have their rigs wired for business so light floods their paths making it fun and challenging to hit the trails for nonstop action. So why can’t the rest of us do that? We’re about to break the mold and beat up the guy that made the mold. We’re going to show the glow on the Axial Deadbolt SCX10 using factory Axial option parts. The Deadbolt comes equipped with a 5-bucket light bar that only requires a few option parts to make them illuminate and so it’s a natural fit to turn into the perfect Daylight Savings Time evening trail runner. But, it’s not going to end with a simple light upgrade. We’re going to take it a step further and show you how to really light up the trails.

PROJECT NIGHT VISION DEADBOLT
Axial Night Run 1
Our project vehicle is a brand new Deadbolt SCX10 ready to run kit. The Deadbolt is assembled from the factory with electronics installed and ready for trail runs day or soon to be night runs. As mentioned, it is already equipped with a 5-bucket light bar on the cage that can be easily fitted with the Axial AX24251 Night Visions System. The NVS actually includes a number of the LED light strings that will fit right on the Deadbolt. Installation is easy, let’s get to work.


OPTIONS USED
Axial Night Run 15

The Night Visions System or NVS is a great for customizing any scale RC machine. This set controls the headlights, tail lights, brake lights, and right/left turn signals, as well as some extra auxiliary lighting. The complete details on this set are: HERE

Includes the following LED light strings:
(1) Double LED light string for headlights (White LED)
(1) Double LED light string for brake lights (Red LED)
(2) Double LED light strings for turn signals (Orange LED)
(1) 5 LED light string for auxiliary lights (White LED)

TOOLS NEEDED
Axial Night Run 11
1.5mm & 2mm Hex Driver
Reamer
Small Zip-Ties
2-Sided Tape
Scissors
Soldering iron and solder (possibly)


STEP 1
Axial Night Run 4
The first step to installing the 5-LED light string (included with the NVS) in the Deadbolt light housings is to locate the LED retaining retainers on the back of the light buckets. There you will see a small screw holding the retainer in place. Using your 1.5mm hex driver, remove all five screws and retainers.

STEP 2
Axial Night Run 5
Unpack the LED string and place a retainer onto one of the end LED’s and then slip that prepped light into one of the end light buckets on the rack.

STEP 3
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Time to secure that LED. Using the screw and your 1.5mm hex driver attach the retainers to the light housing with the screw.

STEP 4
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Repeat the process for the remaining lights. We “twisted” the wires as we went along for a neater look.

STEP 5
Axial Night Run 8
The power wire needs to be run inside of the body. Using your reamer, locate an area to make a hole where you can run the wire inside of the body.

STEP 6
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Feed the LED power wire into the body.


Axial Night Run 10
TIP: Use zip-ties to secure the wires to the roll bar for a finished look.


STEP 7
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The NVS controller needs to be connected to the receiver to utalize all of its functions. To access the receiver, use your 2mm hex driver and remove the two receiver box lid screws. Pop the top off the box.

STEP 8
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Locate the Channel 1 and 2 port on the receiver; unplug your servo and ESC. Remember, the servo is Chanel 1 and the ESC is Channel 2.

STEP 9
Axial Night Run 17
Now plug the servo lead into the NVS system in line with the Channel 1 signal lead on the NVS. Repeat for the Channel 2/ ESC lead.

STEP 10
Axial Night Run 18
The NVS works inline with your servo and ESC signals. It interprets the signals and can initiate LED functions that work in sync with your vehicle’s movement. For example, when you turn, the NVS will make the turn signal blink. If you hit the brake on the radio, the brake lights will illuminate on your truck if you choose to install them. We’re keeping it simple here by powering our light bar. To complete the wiring, you’ll need to plug the Channel 1 lead from the NVS into the receiver and then follow suit for Channel 2.

STEP 11
Axial Night Run 19
It’s best to tidy up your wiring. Take a zip-tie or two and neatly bundle the extra wire before tucking it into the receiver box.

STEP 12
Axial Night Run 20
It’s time to find a location for your NVS power controller. We’re going to use a piece of double sided tape to adhere the controller to the top of the receiver box. We’ve used two additional pieces to fill in the indents on top of the box for a larger area for the NVS to stick to. This location will give us easy access to the wiring.

STEP 13
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Once the controller is attached to the box, use some zip-ties to neaten up any hanging wires. Secure the NVS on/off switch using 2-sided tape to an easy access location.

STEP 14
Axial Night Run 22 Axial Night Run 23

Locate the power harness to power your NVS system, it is included with the set. You’ll notice it has two Tamiya connectors with a jumper wire. Insert the small white plug into the power port on the NVS. Since the newest model Deadbolt comes with a Star-Plug, it will not work with the Tamiya connectors. Rather than solder Star Plugs to the harness, we’re going to take a neater approach to integrating the connector. We’re going to cut the small gauge power wire leading to the NVS and solder it to the tabs of the Star-Plug.

STEP 15
Axial Night Run 24
After a quick solder task, the NVS power wire looks at home connected to the Star-Plug and much neater without the additional connectors. If you don’t have a soldering iron, you can probably head to the hobby shop where you purchased your machine and they can solder it for you. Some shops might charge a service fee for soldering. Or you can head out and purchase your own soldering supplies, they certainly come in handy for this hobby.

STEP 16
Axial Night Run 25
This is probably a great time just to check to make certain the components power up. We’re going to use the Auxiliary ports for our rack lights and front bumper/fog lights. Here we’ve plugged the fog lights into one of the upper Auxiliary ports. First turn on your radio and then plug in your battery to the ESC to power the Deadbolt. Turn on the NVS switch and wait a few seconds. The NVS has to power up and then it will illuminate the LED’s. We’re Good!

STEP 17
Axial Night Run 26
There is a two LED white light string in the NVS (shown above) and two open light buckets in the Deadbolt bumper. Seems like a match to me, let’s add them too! Remove the bumper to install the LED lights by removing the two bumper retaining screw pins with a 1.5mm hex driver.

STEP 18
Axial Night Run 27
Locate the rest of the parts you’ll need. That means going back and finding the additional parts that came with your kit. Here you’ll find the two LED retainers you need. You’ll also need a pack of AX31066 M2x8mm screws to secure the retainers. Then dip back into the NVS box to find that 2-LED string.

STEP 19
Axial Night Run 28
Install the LED light into the bumper in the same manor as you installed the lights in the light buckets. Once both lights are installed, place the bumper back in the cross-brace and reinstall the retaining screw pins. Plug the LED wire connector in to any Aux port on the NVS.

Axial NVS Plugs
We’re almost done! Place a fully charged battery into your Deadbolt, turn on your radio and then plug your battery in. Now connect the extension wire from the 5-light string into the controller Aux port. You should have working lights! Place the body on the truck, insert your four body pins… And go explore the trails at night!

Axial Night Run 29

Axial Night Run 30

Axial Night Run 31

Now your ready to go make some cool images! See our blog post:
Night Photography Tips by Ian Coble

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SCX10 II Rubicon Trail Adventure With Photo Pro Brad Perry

 

SCX10 II Rubicon Trail Adventure

Mention the name Rubicon Trail and just about anyone you speak to will say they’ve heard of it whether they are into 4×4 off-roading or not. If by some reason, like you’ve been abducted by aliens for most of your life and you’ve never heard of the Rubicon Trail, here is the short of it. The trail’s origination actually began as an Indian trading route and in the 1800’s became a service road, but over time lessened in use and the terrain degraded. The scenic trail with unique terrain then became a favorite for explorers and adventurers. In the early 1950’s, the trail sprung back to life as the Jeepers Jamboree event picked the trail as its home. The trail that spans from from Georgetown, CA to Tahoma, CA at Lake Tahoe and has basically become internationally known as an ultimate destination for hiking, 4X4′s, motorcycle or quad, or mountain bike adventures.

That leads us to the story of Brad Perry, a hiker, adventurist, professional photographer and more importantly, an Axial RC fanatic. Brad joined the media at Axialfest 2017 and captured some amazing moments from the event, so our eyes were on his work. Then he posted a photo (above) from his recent trek on the Rubicon Trail, that he organized himself, to his social media. Brad had our attention once again and we got a hold of him to tell his story of the trip.

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About:
Name: Brad Perry
Age: 32
Hometown: Born and raised in Livermore, CA but I have lived in South Lake Tahoe, CA for the past 11 years
Profession: Owner of Von Perry Photography and Freelance photographer
Hobbies: Bouldering, Hiking, Riding all types of bikes

Prep:
Prior hikes – I hike almost every day for work. If I’m not out shooting some kind of action sports, I’m in my local area hiking around with my wife, dog and RC. When it comes to the Rubicon I had hiked the trail multiple times for other photo assignments so I had a lot of prior knowledge of the trail.
Physical prep – I knew I could hike the mileage with no issue but I had to do a lot of overall prep. I did 3 prior hikes that were around 12-14 miles each. I had to figure out what mileage the truck was getting so I didn’t run out of battery power and I had to figure out my overall pace so I could plan on being picked up at the finish.

Gear:
Clothing  – Shorts and my Axial t-shirt
Shoes – Altra Timps
Backpack –North Face Mega Mouth
Headlamp- Petzl Tikka
Supplies – Sony A7s Camera, Canon 16-35mm and a 50mm lens, folding tripod, iPhone6s, tools if anything breaks on trail.
Extra parts – Front and rear drivelines, C-hubs and knuckles, steering servo, a servo horn and a few misc screws.

Nutrition:
Food and hydration – Two PB&J sandwiches, one Cliff Bar and some beef jerky. Two Lemonade Rockstar Recovery energy drinks. 50oz of Skratch Labs exercise hydration mix and 50oz of water.

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The Rig:
Axial SCX10 II RTR
Upgrades – Axial 1.9 BFGoodrich Krawler T/A’s, Vanquish shock hoops, Vanquish Method 105’s, CI single stage foams, HR hardened trans gears, Proline 4runner body
Special mods – None
Electronics – Castle Mamba-X with a 1410 3800kv brushless system. Spektrum DX4C radio system. Stock steering servo.
Lighting  No lighting on the rig.
Batteries – I took 6 Venom 2s 5000mha 50c batteries. I used about 28,500mha in total.
The radios batteries held up just fine.

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Challenges:
The trail itself is very challenging just to hike. It’s not your normal well groomed hiking trail. Lots of loose rock and silt covered slabs. Traction and footing is a constant issue. I knew I wanted to go fast but I needed to be safe at the same time. Twisting an ankle out that far with no support is something you have in the back of your mind the whole time. I was also on the trail during very low traffic times so the hopes of a ride out were low.

Tough obstacles- I had it in my mind that areas like Big Sluice and Little Sluice were going to be my biggest issues. The water crossing at Buck Island was also a worry. Funny thing was the hardest obstacle ended up being the Buck Island Dam. It’s a little taller than a curb and is only passible in one direction with the truck. When you go the other way you have to go way up by the bathrooms and down into one of the trailside camps. The other thing that had me worried was the amount of silt on the trail. In some places it was 3 inches deep. Other than that the SCX10 II handled it all like a champ.

Damage:
I only had one issue on both passes and it was a total mistake. In the first few hours of my first trip I bent over to tie my shoe and hit the trigger. I sent my truck into a huge rock at full speed and stripped the plastic servo horn. I quickly pulled out the tools and had it fixed in minutes. The overall performance of the SCX10 II RTR was amazing.

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HOG- On my first trip I rolled 6 times in total but only ended up on my roof turtled twice to where I had to pick it up. On the second trip I had a few more because I was going a lot faster. There were no points where the truck couldn’t make it up something and I had to pick it up over the obstacle. That’s one of the best parts of this trail.
Memorable Moment- It’s hard to narrow down just one part of the trail as being the most memorable. One of my favorite areas on the trail is the top of the slabs overlooking Buck Island Lake and the whole surrounding valley. My most memorable moment was an older gentlemen asking me if I was hiking or driving the trail? I chuckled and said both. I have to place the tires in the right places don’t I? He laughed and agreed.

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Overall Experience- I started both of my hikes around 4AM completely solo. Hiking on the Loon Lake side on the open granite slabs under the stars was great. On my second trip leaving Tahoma you have about 6 miles of heavily wooded trail. I found my mind racing a little at times thinking I was hearing animals in the bushes. Wondering if a bear was going to come out and start chasing the truck like a playful dog. I did both of my trips mid-week so I ran into very little traffic on the trail. I only saw 2 people my first time and 6 or so on the second. The trail is really amazing because it’s consistently challenging end to end. Even if you try to make it easy on yourself you still end up doing a great deal of difficult crawling. I stopped at the same places along the trail on both trips. I took breaks at Buck Island and Observation Point and then ate food at the middle point at Rubicon Springs. When I first did the trail I parked my car at Loon Lake and left it there with the plan of picking it up the next day. I had so much fun the first time I took two days to recover and hiked it back the other direction to pick my car up. The Rubicon is a blast and I would do it again any time.

I definitely have a few people to thank for the helping get this done. Everyone at CKRC, Castle Creations, Venom Power, SF Threads, Scale Ultra, SBG, Altra Running and Axial Racing! I also couldn’t have done this without the support of my wife. She sat in a parking lot waiting to pick me up with no cell service for hours, then 2 days later woke up at 3am to drop me off so I could do it all again.

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Trip Stats
Trip 1
Start-The Rubicon sign at the Loon Lake Staging
Finish-The sign at “Tahoma Staging” – McKinney-Rubicon Springs Staging
Miles: 15.77
Time: 8 hours 31 minutes 46 seconds
Vert: 2744ft
Rest: 3-10 minute breaks
Weight: Backpack was 21lbs

Trip 2
Start: The sign at “Tahoma Staging” – McKinney-Rubicon Springs Staging
Finish: The Rubicon sign at the Loon Lake Staging
Miles 15.77
Time: 6 hours 42 minutes 47 seconds
Vert: 2502ft
Rest 3-10 minute breaks
Weight: backpack 21lbs

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Adventure Inspiration
Brad’s trip was certainly an exciting trip from the details given and through some amazing photos. His trip was not the first time an RC rig hit the Rubicon Trail. Among many others, the Axial team hit the trails too with the release of the SCX10™ 2012 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon; you can see that adventure HERE. We’re sure there will be many more adventures too that will hit the terrain with an Axial RC trail machine in hand. But Brad’s story is inspirational. Brad hit the trail alone, with the right amount of supplies and a nearly stock SCX10 II rig that made the length of the trail without major issue. Also in record time for an RC machine with Brad pushing hard both driving and hiking. We hope this inspires you to take your Axial Adventure to the next level too. Find and design your own RC experience and be sure to tag it with #AxialAdventure as it is becoming a way of life that many want to see and share.

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New To RC – Deadbolt Box To Backyard Guide

Deadbolt_Box_BackyardGuide

Starting your RC adventure is easy with any Axial ready to run kit. Here we’re going to show you just how easy it is. In only the time it takes to charge your battery, we’ll show you how to get an SCX10 Deadbolt from the box to the backyard.

Axial Deadbolt 01
You’ve selected the SCX10 Deadbolt! What drew you in? The bright green body, the poise of the driver figure or perhaps it was the light bar on the roof? Whatever the reason, this radio control machine is based on one of the most popular chassis’ in radio control and it will deliver nonstop adventures wherever you take it.

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Before you tear into that box… well, you probably did already and we don’t blame you. But the first step in getting your adventure under-way should actually be directed towards your battery. During your purchase, you’ve selected a battery and charger for your Deadbolt. Now is a great time to read through your specific charger manual, setup and charge your new battery. It’s going to take some time to charge, so get the process going while you get into your Deadbolt kit.

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Now you can dive into the box and depending on which end you open first, you’ll most likely be greeted with some of the kit contents. Here is the included Tactic TTX300 radio in a protective bubble pack, the radio and kit manual, and a bag of parts. We’ll get into the parts bag later.

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Next you can slide the Deadbolt out of the box. Get excited!

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Like many boxed items, you’ll need a pair of strong scissors or cutters to cut the zip-ties holding the Deadbolt to the inner box.

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There it is, your new Deadbolt nearly ready for action, the rig comes assembled, body painted and electronics installed. There are only a few steps to get it ready for action.

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Wait! We know you want to dive in, but take a few moments to read through the included manuals. The Axial team spends a lot of time on the manual to explain everything you need to know about your new model.

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Batteries! Here we go, its time to install some fresh AA batteries in the Tactic TTX300 radio. The radio only requires 4 cells. To access the battery tray, slide the cover off the bottom of the radio. Next make certain you note how the cells are inserted. There will be a diagram in the battery tray that indicates how the batteries are installed.

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Time to remove the body in order to install the battery to power your Deadbolt. There will be two body retaining clips in the front and two in the rear. Simply slide them out and set them aside.

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Once the body is removed, you’ll notice a tag with some information. Yes, you should read it too. This is a quick start tag that gives you information on how the electronic speed control is set and how to turn your truck on and off.

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This is a good time to familiarize yourself with the SCX10. Your manual has a diagram of the trucks major components. It is a good idea to look at the diagram and the rig to get to know all of the parts.

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Each Axial kit comes with the electronic speed control set to LiPo mode for use with Lithium Polymer batteries. This is done as a safety measure so the battery does not go below a certain voltage that can damage the battery. If you chose to use a NiMh battery, it will work in LiPo mode, but not as efficiently as if it were in NiMh mode. Switching your ESC between modes isn very easy by simply moving the “jumper” to the mode that corresponds with your battery.

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Once you’ve adjusted the jumper on the ESC if necessary, you can install your fully charged battery. Loosen the Velcro® straps on the battery plate and slide the battery in. Then pull the straps tight to secure the battery and firmly press the Velcro® together.

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We’re getting close to running! Turn your attention to the radio and locate the On/Off switch on the back of the radio. Switch the radio “On” and make certain the power LED indicator is illuminated on the top of the radio.
TIP: Your radio should always be turned on first and off last to insure you always have control of your RC vehicle.

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Now the Deadbolt is ready to be powered on. This is done by connecting the battery to the ESC. This is your On/Off switch. Use the plug connection to turn it on and unplug the battery to turn the model off.
TIP: Two wire guides are located on the chassis frame rail. These clips can be used to secure wires.

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Almost ready to run; place the body back on the chassis and install the four body clips back on the posts to secure the body. Now you’re ready to head outside for your adventure!

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If you’re completely New To RC, take some time to familiarize yourself with the radio functions and how the Deadbolt responds. Start with the steering, turn the wheel in both directions. Note when standing behind the vehicle, steering left will turn the truck left, but when the vehicle is coming at you, this will be reversed. Don’t worry, you’ll get used to it quickly. Now find an open space and try the throttle. The throttle is proportional, so just pull the trigger slightly so the truck rolls forward. While at a slow speed, make large right turn ovals. After a few right turn ovals, make a few left turn ovals. After your comfortable with ovals. Try figure 8’s. During this practice session, try various speeds and various amounts of steering to get used to your model. The ESC is equipped with reverse too, try it a few times before heading to the nearest pile of rocks or hiking trail.

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Once you are used to how your model operates, you can start your off-road adventures!

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Whoa! What about all of those spare parts? You didn’t think we forgot about them did you? The bag of parts you find in the kit are the extras from the part trees used to build your specific kit. These are parts that are used in other variations of Axial kits. These parts can come in handy, so keep them on hand in case you start customizing your rig. You’ll also notice some additional driver heads, these can be glued together with model glue and painted to give your Deadbolt a unique look. You’ll also receive two green gate markers you can place on trail obstacles to make your challenge a bit more intense. And finally there will be a T-wrench used to remove various nuts on the chassis as well as the wheel nuts.

 

50th BFGoodrich Tires SCORE Baja 1000 – The History

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Article Credit: SCORE® International
Photos By: getsomephoto.com

As we take our Axial Yeti™ SCORE® Trophy Trucks® out to play day after day, this year, above all others, we should stop for a minute to take a look at how the truck came to be.
The Axial SCORE® Truck was inspired by the full-scale trucks that have been racing in the BFGoodrich® Tires SCORE® Baja 1000, 2017 marks the 50th anniversary of this monumental event that changed the face of off-road racing.

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Photo Credit: getsomephoto.com

The long history of the event is surrounded by dedication and passion from its inception by the hands of the Legendary Mickey Thompson, to today’s SCORE® International organization. As the 50th Baja 1000 race draws near on November 12-18, SCORE® International has posted the lineage of the event along with incredible facts describing the highs, lows and background that has shaped this event to what it is today.

Much, much more than just a race, history shines brightly on next month’s 50th BFGoodrich Tires SCORE Baja 1000 pre-race festivities for final round of four-race 2017 SCORE World Desert Championship  includes SEMA SCORE Baja 1000 Experience, presented by BFGoodrich Tires Oct. 30-Nov. 3 at Las Vegas Convention Center; SCORE Baja 1000 qualifying for SCORE Trophy Truck at Las Vegas Motor Speedway Off-Road Track at 6 p.m. Oct. 31; Granddaddy of All Desert Races to be televised on El Rey Network.

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Photo Credit: getsomephoto.com

ENSENADA, Mexico— As the World Series is to baseball, the Super Bowl to football and the World Cup to soccer, the legendary SCORE Baja 1000 continues to stand as tall at the pinnacle of the motorsports world today as it did when it began 50 years ago. It is aptly referred to as the Granddaddy of All Desert Races. This year’s historic 50th golden anniversary race, sponsored for the first time by BFGoodrich Tires, will be held Nov. 12-18. It will start in the heart of Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico covering much of the majestic Baja California peninsula. It will finish in La Paz, Baja California Sur. It will be the 50th anniversary of the race shrouded in mystery that continues to lure the world’s best racers and adventurers from around the globe who all continue to share the dream to conquer the Baja. Racer registration continues at www.score-international.com for the iconic race. The race is the season-finale of the four-race 2017 SCORE World Desert Championship

ROOTS It’s the oldest and most well known of all desert races, and it remains as the single most appealing accomplishment to a driver. Since 1967, the mother of all desert races has been run over the mysterious, majestic Baja California peninsula every year except 1974 when an international fuel crisis forced a cancellation. The SCORE Baja 1000 has captured the imagination of the entire world as entries have come not only from every state in the United States, the District of Columbia and U.S. territories Guam and Puerto Rico, but also has attracted racers from Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Brazil, Belgium, Canada, Chile, Columbia, China, Cyprus, England, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Lithuania, Morocco, New Caledonia, New Zealand, Netherlands, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, Uruguay, Yugoslavia as well as the host country of Mexico. Over the years, SCORE races have been televised in more than 100 nations worldwide.

PRELUDE The first known record run occurred in 1962. Dave Ekins and Bill Robertson Jr. timed their trip from Tijuana to La Paz on a pair of Honda 250 motorcycles. Ekins made it in 39 hours, 54 minutes, Robertson in less than an hour slower. There were no official timers, of course, and to establish that they had made the trip, the two motorcycle racers time-stamped a sheet of paper in the Tijuana telegraph office and time-stamped it again at the telegraph office when they arrived in La Paz. They began their journey at midnight in Tijuana. Capitalizing on the pioneer effort of Ekins and Robertson, Chevrolet commissioned car builder Bill Stroppe to prepare a small fleet of trucks for the run to La Paz. Late that year they left Long Beach, Calif., and all of them reached La Paz. Advertising and publicity campaigns heralded the feat as “the roughest run under the sun.”

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Photo Credit: getsomephoto.com

STILL NO. 1 For the last two years, readers of USA Today newspaper have voted the SCORE Baja 1000 as the No. 1 motorsports event in the world. “Without the SCORE Baja 1000, there just wouldn’t be any desert racing,” said Roger Norman, SCORE International’s President and CEO. “The SCORE Baja 1000 continues to draw interest from all over the world and we now find second, third and even fourth generation racers appearing at the starting line with their family patriarchs cheering for their off-spring. This event continues to be the focal point of the SCORE World Desert Championship each year the celebration of our 50th anniversary will surely add another colorful chapter to the golden legacy of the SCORE Baja 1000.” 1967 Enthusiast Ed Pearlman founded the National Off Road Racing Association (NORRA) and established the Mexican 1000. It started officially in Tijuana on October 31, 1967 with 68 entries. They actually motored at leisure speeds to Ensenada and restarted the next day. NORRA continued to organize the Mexican 1000, which came to be known as the Baja 1000. In 1968, Pearlman moved the start of the race to Ensenada, where it stayed with one exception until 1993. In 1972 NORRA started at Mexicali and ran the first half of the race down the east coast of the peninsula through the treacherous Three Sisters section. Pre-running for this race, Parnelli Jones and Walker Evans were among a group of competitors who nearly got swept out to sea during a tropical storm. NORRA’s last race was in 1972. At that point, Mexican officials revoked NORRA’s permits to stage races in Baja. In 1973, a domestic group called the Baja Sports Committee produced the race.

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Photo Credit: getsomephoto.com

NEW BEGINNINGS After the fuel crisis of 1974 forced local officials to cancel the event, SCORE International, founded by the late Mickey Thompson and headed soon after by Sal Fish (until 2012), was invited by the northern state of Baja California to hold the race in 1975. The SCORE Baja 1000 became a loop event starting and ending in Ensenada. Roger Norman purchased SCORE International from Fish on Dec. 20, 2012. In 1979, the government of Baja California Sur granted permission to resume the Ensenada-to-La Paz format and SCORE has used this route intermittently ever since. The 1979 race was notable for Walker Evans’ overall win in a Dodge truck, the first truck to win the overall title of the race.

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Photo Credit: getsomephoto.com

START/FINISH In its first 49 years, the SCORE Baja 1000 has started 42 times in Ensenada, three times in Mexicali (1972, 1993, 1994), twice in Tijuana (1967, 1995) once in Santo Tomas (1998) and once in Ojos Negros (1999). The legendary race has finished in Ensenada 24 times, in La Paz 20 times, in Mexicali two times (1993, 1994), twice in Cabo San Lucas (2000, 2007) and once in Ojos Negros (1999).

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Photo Credit: getsomephoto.com

FAMOUS The famous and not-so-famous have tried their hand at conquering the Baja and they have come from all walks of life. Mark Thatcher, son of Great Britain’s then-prime minister Margaret Thatcher, raced in the 1982 SCORE Baja 1000. Celebrities James Garner, Ted Nugent and the late Steve McQueen all battled the Baja in the early 1970s and many racers from other forms of motorsports crossed over to try their skills. Among the drivers from other arenas who have tested the Baja were Indy Car racers Rick and Roger Mears, Parnelli Jones, Danny Ongias, Danny Sullivan, Jimmy Vasser, Buddy Rice, Sebastien Bourdais, Oriol Servia, Roberto Guerrero, Michel Jourdain Jr., Johnny Unser and Mike and Robbie Groff, NASCAR’s Robby Gordon, Jimmie Johnson, Boris Said and Brendan Gaughan, SCCA legend Elliot Forbes-Robinson, World Rally Championships’ Armin Schwarz, Armin Kremer, Andreas Aigner and Harri Pavanpera,, world motorcycle champions Malcolm Smith, Larry Roeseler and Destry Abbott, Motocross legends Ricky Johnson and Jeremy McGrath, XGames star Travis Pastrana, drag racers Don Prudhomme and Larry Minor and legendary SCORE founder and motorsports innovator Mickey Thompson. The late Academy Award winning actor, racer and race team owner Paul Newman raced in the 2004 event. Jesse James, of ‘Monster Garage’ fame, and Hollywood film and TV star Patrick Dempsey both have raced in this classic several times.

LEGENDS This year’s race will commemorate the achievements of legendary desert racers like Rod Hall, Ron Bishop, Johnny Johnson, and Larry Roeseler. Hall, who will turn 80 on Nov. 22, has a record 24 class wins (including one overall win in 1969), and is the only racer who has competed in all 49 SCORE Baja 1000 races. Bishop was the only racer who competed in the first 40 SCORE Baja 1000 races all on a motorcycle. Hall will be racing this year in the Stock Full class with his son Chad Hall as he attempts to add to his untouchable legacy. Bishop, now deceased, was the only racer who competed every year of the first 40 on a motorcycle. Johnson, now retired, had 15 class wins, amazingly in eight different classes. Roeseler, has won 17 times in this race, including 13 overall wins (10 on a motorcycle). Roeseler will share driving duties this year in SCORE Trophy Truck with Luke McMillin in the No. 83 Ford F-150. Roeseler won the unlimited Class 1 for four consecutive years (2004-2007), driving with the youngest of three racing brothers, Troy Herbst, in the Smithbuilt-Ford open-wheel desert race car that was known as the ‘Land Shark’. Roeseler is the only racer in the history of the event to win the overall 4-wheel in a truck and also in a car as well as the overall 2-wheel title as well. In 2008, Roeseler split the driving with driver of record and team owner and now SCORE owner Roger Norman when they were the overall 4-wheel and SCORE Trophy Truck champions and the pair was second in 2009. In 2010, Roger Norman drove solo the length of the peninsula and finished third overall. Special history was also made in 2010 when the father/son team of Gustavo Vildosola Sr and Gustavo ‘Tavo’ Vildosola Jr, of Mexicali, drove to the overall 4-wheel and SCORE Trophy Truck victory to become the first Mexican nationals’ team to win the legendary race and it was a peninsula run from Ensenada to La Paz.

SAME SIREN Lured by the same siren that enraptured the Ekins brothers in the 1950s, the SCORE Baja 1000 remains as the No. 1 target of adventurers the world over, not to mention the cadre of pro and semi-pro desert racers who consider it the fitting climax to their racing season each year.

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Photo Credit: getsomephoto.com

THIS YEAR-SPLIT-START Commemorating the first race, motorcycle and quad classes will start at midnight (PT) on Wednesday, Nov. 15 and the car, truck and UTV classes will begin their journey in the elapsed-time race 10 hours later at 10 a.m. (PT) on Thursday, Nov. 16. While the fastest vehicles are expected to complete the course in approximately 20 hours, all vehicles will have 48 hours from the time each starts to complete the course and become an official finisher of the 50th anniversary race.

THE WHO The royalty of desert racing will be in this year’s field and leading the way will once again be the marquee SCORE Trophy Trucks, the SCORE-created class for high-tech, 900-horsepower unlimited production trucks. There are already 37 SCORE Trophy Trucks entered in this year’s celebratory race. Among the entries in SCORE Trophy Truck are No. 11 Rob MacCachren/Jason Voss, No. 1 Carlos ‘Apdaly’ Lopez/Juan C. Lopez, No. 77 Robby Gordon, No. 31 Andy McMillin/Tavo Vildosola, No. 97 B.J. Baldwin/Rodimiro Amaya, No. 15 Billy Wilson/Chad Bunch, No. 4 Justin Matney/Josh Daniel, No. 23 Dan McMillin/Gary Weyhrich, No. 19 Tim Herbst/P.J. Jones, No. 7 Bryce Menzies, No. 83 Luke McMillin/Larry Roeseler, No. 91 Troy Herbst/Brett Sourapas, No. 3 Mark Post/Ed Herbst/Kyle LeDuc, No. 9 Armin Schwarz/Eduardo Laguna, No. 16 Cameron Steele/Cody Stuart/Pat Dean/Rene Brugger, No. 14 Cameron Steele/Cody Stuart/Pat Dean/Rene Brugger, No. 41 Justin Lofton/Matt Loiodice, No. 76 Jesse Jones/Austin Jones/Toby Price, No. 21 Pat O’Keefe/Mark McMillin, No. 5L Clyde Stacy/Jeff Geiser (SCORE TT Legend class) and No. 21L Gus Vildosola Sr/Rodrigo Ampudia Sr/Scott Bailey (SCORE TT Legend).

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Photo Credit: getsomephoto.com

THE WHERE To date, there are 206 total entries from 34 U.S. States, two U.S. Territories and 19 countries officially signed up to compete. In addition to the United States, the U.S. Territories of Guam and Puerto Rico and the host country Mexico, the other countries with racers entered are Australia, Austria, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, England, Finland, France, Germany, India, Israel, Italy, Japan, New Zealand, Peru, South Africa and Spain.

WHO ELSE BUT SAL! Sal Fish, 78, the iconic desert racing promoter who owned SCORE International for 38 years, will be the Grand Marshal for November’s 50th BFGoodrich Tires SCORE Baja 1000. Off-Road Motorsports Hall of Famer Fish, who lives in Malibu, Calif., has earned more awards in his life than most racers have won races and was the face of SCORE from 1974 until he sold the company to Roger and Elise Norman on Dec. 20, 2012. A graduate from the University of San Francisco, Fish had risen to the top as the Publisher of Hot Rod Magazine when Mickey Thompson, who founded SCORE in 1973, recruited Fish to be the President of SCORE.

DUST 2 GLORY From award-winning documentary filmmaker Brown, ‘Dust 2 Glory,’ scheduled to premiere nationwide on Dec. 6, chronicled each of the four races in the 2016 SCORE World Desert Championship. Brown’s original Dusty to Glory, released in 2005, became an iconic classic showcasing the legendary SCORE Baja 1000. D2G, which began shooting at the 2015 SCORE Baja 1000, continued up close and personal coverage capturing the robust racers in their amazing adventures in Mexico’s majestic Baja California peninsula through all four spectacular 2016 races. Executive Producer is BCII’s Bud Brutsman. Tickets for the special, one-night Dec. 6 nationwide premiere will go on sale on Oct. 23. For information regarding tickets and theater locations, visit https://www.fathomevents.com/events/dust-2-glory.

EL REY NETWORK The four-race 2017 SCORE World Desert Championship in Baja California, Mexico along with the SEMA SCORE Baja 1000 Experience/SCORE Baja 1000 Qualifying in Las Vegas are all airing on El Rey Network in the United States. International distribution is by way of syndication. The season-ending 50th SCORE Baja 1000 will have a two-hour show produced while the other race shows are each one-hour telecasts. El Rey Network is available in 45 million homes across the country through cable and OTT providers and via satellite on DirecTV Channel 341 and Dish Network Channel 253. For more information on how to watch El Rey visit http://elreynetwork.com.

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Photo Credit: getsomephoto.com

SCORE SPONSORS… Official SCORE Sponsors: BFGoodrich Tires-Official Tire & Official Race Title Sponsor, Monster Energy-Official Energy Drink, King Shocks-Official Shock Absorber, RACELINE Wheels-Official Wheel, Axial R/C-Official R/C Vehicle, El Rey Network-Official Television Partner, Wide Open Excursions-Official Arrive and Drive Company, Crystal Bay Casino-Official Casino. SCORE Official Partners: PCI Race Radios, 4 Wheel Parts, The Satellite Phone Store, Satellite Del Norte, Instant Mexico Auto Insurance, CETTO Vineyards. Additional SCORE Associate Partners: Proturismo Ensenada, Baja California Secretary of Tourism, Baja California Sur State Government, Baja California Sur Secretary of Tourism, Mexicali Ayuntamiento, COTUCO Mexicali/San Felipe, Cruz Roja Mexicana, Corporate Helicopters, McKenzie’s Performance Products, Advanced Color Graphics. Tijuana SCORE Desert Challenge Special Partners: XXII Ayuntamiento de Tijuana, Baja California Secretary of Tourism, Tijuana Comite de Turismo and Convenciones, Comite de Marcadotecnia Turistica, Asociacion de Hoteles del Noroeste. For more information regarding SCORE, visit the official website of the SCORE World Desert Championship at www.SCOREInternational.com.

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Photo Credit: getsomephoto.com

To see all of the SCORE® Baja 1000 Milestones including: All-Time Finish Sites, Top Total Starters, Top Total Finishers, Top Total Starters and Top Total Finishers; visit: 50th BFGoodrich Tires SCORE Baja 1000

How do you Camp? – Living Arrangements At Axialfest

There is nothing like the true outdoors experience of Axialfest where not only do you become one with your RC machine while trekking across some amazing landscape, but you take advantage of an amazing camping experience at the beautiful campgrounds at Cisco Grove. During the week long event, you’ll pass by a variety of living arrangements and if you’ve never been to Axialfest, but have it on your list of to do’s we want you to be prepared.

THE LODGE Living Arrangements At Axialfest

Although the Lodge has a few rooms, they are typically reserved and you really need to think about what style of camping suits you. The Lodge however does have a small market with essential supplies like beverages, food and things you may need on your campsite. Firewood is available too, and necessary for those times spent talking with friends about the day’s trail adventures.

THE CLASSIC TENT Living Arrangements At Axialfest Living Arrangements At Axialfest

There is no shortage of tent sightings at Axialfest, this is the easiest, most compact way to get maximum gear into your 1:1 vehicle and still stow some living quarters in there as you make your journey to Axialfest. Beyond the tent, remember a tarp to place under the tent, sleeping bags, lights and some towel when using the campgrounds bathroom facilities to get your day going.

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POP UP’S Living Arrangements At Axialfest

These are like an extension of camping homes across the park. Many attendees bring pop-up tents as well to cover things like their picnic tables or even their work tables where they wrench on their RC rigs. Which is more important to cover? Food or RC stuff? We leave that decision up to you.

THAT THERE IS AN RV Living Arrangements At Axialfest

Motor homes, RV’s, Trailer, whatever you want to call it, there plenty of these camping homes nestled into the campgrounds for the week. Many people bring their own, some rent and there are the borrowers too. There was even a report of Axial’s John Schultz tirelessly setting up a sleeping space for some rogue reporter who wound up sleeping elsewhere, what a dork. But back on topic, Cisco Grove is a campground, a large campground that has been around for years and has all the amenities necessary for camping hook-ups. They even offer dry firewood for your fire pit… Axialfest Camping

FULL TILT Living Arrangements At Axialfest

There are spots where you will see full tilt set-ups, small communities of sorts where friends camp together and multiple spots turn into one. RV’s, tents, pop-ups, tables, BBQ’s, coolers, temporary floors, satellite dishes and we even saw a pool! And why not? What we are showing here is maximum comfort and a vacation-like atmosphere for all who attend.

Living Arrangements At Axialfest Living Arrangements At Axialfest

PREPARE YOUR SPACE Living Arrangements At Axialfest

Remember at Axialfest, you need to be pretty self sufficient. There are some stores nearby, but who wants to travel off of the grounds when there are so many trails to tackle with your trail truck? It’s best to arrive with everything you’ll possible need on hand. Beyond your Axial RC gear, you’ll need food, fluids, sleeping bags, shower items, cloths, supplies for cooking and so on. Please remember to take out what you take in as we all need to do our part to keep the facilities clean for years of Axialfest events to com.

GET STARTED FOR NEXT YEAR

Believe it, or not, after Axialfest 2017 wrapped up or any of the previous Axialfest, the very next day, Axial Staff as well as attendees have already started on preparing for next years event. Making lists of things that need to get done, lists of things to bring and keeping an eye out for open registration and campsite bookings. If you want to camp near your friends, you need to get together with them ahead of time to find and book the right spot. Axialfest has grown quite large and even though Cisco Grove is massive, it is filling up and spaces are starting to become limited. Get ready and get in on the action!

Tips To Get Around Axialfest – Axialfest 2017

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Not only is Axialfest one of the biggest events in RC in terms of attendance, but it is most likely one of the biggest events in terms of the sheer size of the grounds it takes place on. Axialfest takes place in Cisco Grove Campground in Cisco Grove California and it is the biggest campground and RV park in Donner Summit. So you can imagine with an event so big on many levels, getting around the campground, RC trails and other events can be a bit of a task.
Over the years, frequent attendees have found a number of inventive ways to get around the park for both normal routine tasks and of course for participating in events with all of their RC gear. During Axialfest 2017, we grabbed some photos of how some experienced Axialfesters get around, so when you attend in 2018 and beyond, you can use these tips to be prepared for an even more enjoyable event. Let’s talk toting and travel.

HOOF IT
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Find yourself some comfortable trail shoes for walking, because at Axialfest, you’ll be doing a lot of walking! On average, some staffers logged over five miles of walking each day during the event. Like most participants, you’ll have your radio and Axial machine with you as you locate new trails to drive on or just walk over to a friends campgrounds for some RC talk time. To make life a little easier, many participants have a backpack to help them through the trek. To tote your car around too when it’s rubber is not on the off-road, some drivers use bungee cords, velcro straps and even carabiners to secure the rig to their backpacks. You’ll even see a driver or two towing their car on a dog leash. Hey, whatever you need to do to get your equipment around is what you have to do, nobody will judge, but you may have a friendly joke headed your way from a bystander.

RC FLAT BED IT
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Axialfest is of course an RC event, so it’s only natural that many enthusiasts use an RC truck and trailer to transport their show or go rig from point A to point B. This occurs mostly during registration, concourse, a vendors row drive-by or heading over to see a buddy at another camping section. Flatbeds can range from a single car hauler to a multi-car trailer. At Axialfest everyone loves creativity so bring your wildest hauling creations when you do attend.

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Don’t have a trailer, no problem, beach carts are another great choice. You can pile a lot of equipment in a beach cart and if you are attending the rock racing event and running multiple classes it’s almost a must. Trust us, if you’re not driving your rig or toting it in some sort of wheeled carrier, physically carrying your rig gets a bit tiresome if you are going from one end of the grounds to the other.

MOTOR IT
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There are always those next-level guys, you know the ones that have to have all the neat toys and there is no shortage of them at Axialfest. During the event, you’ll see plenty of pit bikes, ATV’s, golf carts and RZR-type vehicles carrying people and gear around the grounds. Although it is a bit quicker to transport your gear in one of these powered machines, it is highly stressed that these machines travel at safe speeds due to the number of people walking and/or driving their RC rigs on the same roads.

GO BIG
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Finally we have full-scale machines. At Axialfest, there is no shortage of toy eye candy and you’ll see a slew of built 1:1 off-road trail machines from Jeep JK’s, XJ’s, WJ’s, Toyota’s and so on. Sure, many of these trucks are here to trek the nearby Fordyce Trail, but they are also used to trek around the grounds, but during Axialfest, mostly for supply transport purposes. Some of the paths are choked up by participants so getting by in a full scale rig is not possible at all times. It’s also not encouraged either, so keep it in mind, although your full scale rig may be a lot of fun and an appropriate rig for the surroundings, it will most likely spend most of its time parked in front of your campground and admired by you and bypassers.

TRANSPORT TIPS

Get Around Axialfest

Whatever method you use to get around Axialfest, it’s always best to just be prepared from the start. Think of things you’ll need to have on hand whatever your final destination is on the campground. A backpack is a must and useful for many things, carrying a your radio when it’s not in use, a spare battery or two, a tool kit, a small kit of repair parts/spares*, flashlight, some snacks and most importantly fluids for hydration.

* Spares List
Screws, nuts, ball-ends, 2-sided tape, zip-ties, body clips, bearings, knuckles, servo horn, and servo.

PLAN AHEAD
Now that you have an idea of the size of Axialfest and a bunch of tips on how to get your gear around the grounds, it’s best that you plan ahead and gather everything you need before setting foot in Cisco Grove. Sure there is a general store on the campgrounds and a nearby gas station with some food stuff, but if you need any other travel gear, you’ll find yourself back on the highway to hunt down a larger box store to get any support items you may need. Start making your list now and you’ll enjoy Axialfest 2018 that much more when you do arrive.