The Complete Walker IV Backpacking Book by Colin Fletcher and Chip Rawlins

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The Complete Walker IV  by Colin Fletcher and Chip Rawlins
Words: Rodney Wills

The Complete Walker IV is an in-depth guide to backpacking. It can be read as a book or as a guide, but I will get into that later, more importantly, this is the book that I tell people that it saved my life!

Back in 2007, I broke my neck in an off-road motorcycle accident and for a period of time (4-6 months) I did not know what my physical condition outcome would be. LUCKILY, I knew I would be walking, but what I didn’t know is what type of activities I would be able to pursed afterwards. Instead of dwelling on the unknown, I needed something positive to looks towards to, so hiking it was going to be. I needed something to soak myself mentally into (positively) and began reading every possible thing I could find on hiking! In my quest to find the backpacking authority, I discovered this book.

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For me personally, this book is great in that it can be use this book multiple ways; like a traditional book from cover to cover or as a resource guide using the index as it organizes topics specifically and you can reference where in the book that topic is discussed.
I like Colin’s writing style as he tells you more than just the material makeup of a product, he will give you his personal opinion of the product, good, bad, or salty. He also gives in great detail how he is using it within nature and he typically engages you in a way that has you wanting to be with him in that moment or location. While I have not read this book in a while, I still use it be it a specific technical reference, or for some quick inspiration as it sits at by bedside table. I can now simply pick it up and open it to whatever page and just start reading it is a very entertaining read. With the years of experience from both Fletcher and Rawlins, this book is largely credited with launching the modern-day backpacking movement.

Since its first publishing in 1968, this book has been one of the most used sources for hiking and back country information, so classic in fact that Field & Stream magazine called it “the Hiker’s Bible.” But when Fletcher talks about “carrying your house on your back” his writing captivates you beyond just the nuts and bolts “how-to’s” of backpacking.

Mr. Fletcher wrote. Although “the best roof for your bedroom is the sky,” a light tarp is better than a tent. Among his other suggestions: trim the handle of your aluminum pot and even that of your toothbrush thus making impressions upon anyone captivated by the outdoor life. “Colin was sort of the founding father of modern backpacking, the first person to write about going out for an extended period and being self-sufficient,” said Annette McGivney, the Southwest editor of Backpacker Magazine.

But for me personally it was a passage Fletcher wrote on page #5 talking about how he felt he had gone as far as humanly possible into the depths of nature, when out stepped two men from the dark depths of the “unknown!”CompleteWalkerPassage
When I was laid up with a broke neck (literally) this was the type of inspiration that I needed! Even now, fully healed, this is what I seek out!

Colin Fletcher, (now deceased) was almost 80 years old when this 4th edition of his classic book was published in 2002. The IV edition is updated and enlarged, mostly due to the efforts and contributions of Fletcher’s co-author, Chip Rawlins. From Chip, I learned more about minimalist backpacking and the art of just getting out to any spot, even if it is to just sit by a tree on a hillside vs having to do the “big adventure.” While Colin inspired me, Chip made me see the reality and to not “over big” it and just go get out there.

According to David Strevenson of Backpacking Tips, here are the three reasons why you should read The Complete Walker IV:

First, the contents of this book reflect the years of experience in “walking” — what we now call backpacking — by the man who years ago walked the length of the Grand Canyon and then wrote about it in a series of books, launching the modern-day backpacking movement. Fletcher describes in detail everything from how to pack your backpack for crossing a river, to what snacks are best to take with you, to measuring humidity, to calculating the right mix of food for the energy output you need, to real-life example of the dangers of dehydration.

Second, Fletcher’s sometimes brutal reviews of the latest backpacking equipment don’t just give a simple Yes or No review, but actually go deep in discussions about the science of the fabrics and technologies used. Sometimes, where the two authors disagree, you’ll find each of their opinions labeled with their names, and the back and forth dialogue is simply fascinating and very educational.

Third, we know of no other book on the subject of backpacking that is so in-depth and also so full of practical advice and examples from real-life treks as The Complete Walker IV. We guarantee that you’ll find this book loaded with very helpful information if you can set aside some time to read it. At over 800 pages, you won’t finish it in a day or two, but you’ll find yourself coming back to it again and again, and it’s great for reading several months ahead of a major backpacking trip.

With regards to the history of Colin Fletcher, it seems http://colinfletcher.com/biography/

The Complete Walker and Colin Fletcher’s other nine books are reviewed by Schwert who also weaves in some of his early backpacking experiences: http://outdoors.magazine.free.fr/spip.php?article281&lang=en

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AX90060 SCX10 II 2017 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited CRC Box To Trail Guide

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Get geared up! You’re moments away from taking the SCX10 II™ 2017 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited CRC 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD RTR on an adventure, whether it’s in your backyard or trails at the nearest park. The latest addition to the SCX10 II™ line makes going off-road easy, worry free and perhaps most importantly stylish thanks to the CRC body features and accessories. The 2017 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited CRC is loaded with performance features too which are all detailed HERE. In this Axial Blog we’re going to show you how easy it is to wrap up the few details needed to get the rig powered up an on the trails. Let’s get started.

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STEP 1

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If you haven’t jumped into the box by now, what are you waiting for a bus? Carefully cut the factory seals on the box and slide out the contents. The truck will be secured to the inner packaging and you’ll notice some additional bags taped to the bottom of the truck support. Remove the bag of extra parts, radio and manuals. Please take some time to read through the manuals to familiarize yourself with the model, features and adjustments that can be made. Once you’ve done that, you can take a pair of side cutters and clip the zip-ties securing the rig to the cardboard.

STEP 2

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It’s released! Time to get 2017 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited CRC powered up. First remove all four body clips from the top of the body. Now before you tear off the body, the truck is equipped with LED lights. The lights are attached to the body and connect to the power source on the speed control with two connectors. Gently remove the body, tilt it to one side and you can now you can access the battery tray. If necessary, the body can be completely removed by disconnecting the LED’s at the plugs.

STEP 3

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By now, you’ve probably already selected a 7.2V NiMh or 7.4V LiPo battery and appropriate charger. While the battery is out of your SCX10 II, charge the battery. While waiting, you can adjust the battery chemistry type jumper plug on the electronic speed control if necessary. The jumper plug comes from the factory set in LiPo mode. If you have selected a NiMh battery to run, you may want to move the plug to NiMh mode for optimum performance. Only switch the plug if you planning on running NiMh batteries exclusively. If you plan on switching or are just uncertain of your battery types, leave the jumper plug in the factory set location.

STEP 4

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Battery still charging? Move along to installing batteries in the Tacitc TTX300 transmitter. Don’t grab random AA batteries pillaged from devices around the house. Always start with a new set off AA batteries and install them in the bottom of the transmitter noting the polarity. The transmitter requires four cells.

STEP 5

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When your vehicle’s battery has finished charging, you can install it in the truck and it’s very easy to do so. Simply release the velcro strap, slide the battery into the cradle and cinch the velcro closed. Don’t plug it in yet. You’ll need to power up your radio first and then connect the vehicle battery plug to the ESC plug. The plugs act as your on/off switch. After the battery is plugged in, you can re-install the body (plug in the LED’s if you removed the plugs) and slip all four body clips back on to their posts.

TIME TO HIT THE TRAIL

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Adventure awaits! Head outside and get a feel for your new SCX10 II 2017 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited CRC. Practice driving in your yard or a field, get use to the steering, throttle and reversing before heading out to a long trail drive. The SCX10 II is built tough but it’s always better to take things slowly and ease into your hobby fun. Remember to take pictures along the way and post them with the hashtag #AxialAdventures so other adventurers can see your truck and travels.

 

Desert Turtle Racing’s RR10 Bomber

20171004_052111The Ultra4 Racing team of Desert Turtle Racing has a few Axial fans in their group. Myself, for one, just happens to be lucky enough to work for Axial. After attending AxialFest 2016 and competing in the Altra Ultra5k with a bone stock RR10 RTR, I was eager to build up my own RR10 in preparation for my next Altra Ultra5k. With a little downtime from working on the full-scale rig I was able to put together a DTR themed RR10 Bomber Chassis. The RR10 Kit has some awesome features and makes for a great starting platform. I opted to add some pretty cool option parts and electronics to give it a little extra kick.

In Ultra4 Racing, one of the must-have items is a 2-speed T-Case, giving this rig a little more realism. I added the Axial 2-Speed Transmission components to give the rig some great low-speed gearing and some “haul the mail” top end – all shiftable with the Tactic TTX300.

I added a few final touches to try and give it a bit more scale looks; ammo cans, painted fuel cell, fuel filler hose and some key interior stickers.

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Added option parts and electronics

Chassis: AX90053
Steering Hubs: AX30762
Steering Knuckle: AX31434
Front Diff Cover: AX31429
Rear Diff Cover: AX30829
Servo Mount: AX31432
Front Link Mounts: AX31433
Rear Link Mounts: AX31433
Spring Retainers: AX31431
Transmission: AX31181
Steering Servo: Hitec D951TW
Shifting Servo: Hitec HS-985MG
ESC: Tekin FX-R
Motor: Tekin T35 HD
BEC: MaxAmps
Battery: Onyx 11.1 5000mAh
Radio: Tactic TTX300

Find more info about Desert Turtle Racing on Facebook.

How To – Servo and Servo Horn Replacement

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The steering system on a full-size off-road vehicle takes a lot of abuse. It is the same with RC. Whether you’re driving fast over bumps and jumps with an Yeti or crawling over rocks with an SCX10 II or doing a little of both with a Wraith, the steering is constantly taking hits. Whatever you hit, roll over or dig up onto, usually contacts the steering system first. In a similar fashion, and again just as it is in full-size off-road, one of the best ways to improve the capabilities of your RC vehicle is to make improvements its steering system. Instead of installing a hydraulic assist, in RC, we upgrade the servo. Instead of installing a custom pitman arm, in RC, we use an aluminum servo horn. These upgrades are simple tasks that can be performed by hobbyists of any experience level (if you aren’t an adult, get adult assistance and/or supervision).

Installing a New Servo Horn

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STEP 1. Depending on your model, it may be necessary to remove some components to make servo access easier. On this SCX10, the bumper and cross-member have been removed.

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STEP 2. Remove the servo horn. The horn is most likely retained by a Phillips head screw, or a 2 mm screw. Either way, the screw is easy to access and remove. There may be a lock washer under the screw, so be careful not to lose it. Set this hardware aside. A small dish or tray is handy to prevent losing parts. Pull the servo horn off the servo.

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STEP 4. Select your new servo horn. Axial offers heavy aluminum servo horns that are essentially indestructible. These horns are offered in 23, 24 and 25 spline counts to fit any brand of servo. Axial servos use 25 spline count output shafts. These servo horns are highly recommended and go a long way towards improving a vehicle’s reliability. They should, however, only be used with heavy-duty metal gear servos that can withstand the forces that will be pass through the steering to the servo.

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STEP 5. Attach the steering link to the servo horn. This is pretty simple. Note that even if you use a servo horn with threaded holes, you still need a locknut on the screw that attaches the link to the horn.

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STEP 6. The vehicle must be powered up to properly install a new servo horn. Install a battery and turn on your transmitter. Plug in the battery and turn your vehicle on. Next, set your transmitter’s steering trim (channel 1) to zero. If your transmitter has sub trim, you need to also set that to zero for steering. After the trims have been set to zero, you can turn off the vehicle and then the transmitter.

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STEP 7. Slide the servo horn onto the output shaft and secure it with the main center screw. Axial’s HD servo horns are a double clamping design, so if you’re using one, you will also need to tighten the two 1.5 mm screws on the sides of the horn. Tighten all three screws down tight. Thread lock is not recommended on any of these screws. If you find, over time, that the main screw repeatable loosens and using a new screw doesn’t help, you can use a small amount of medium strength thread lock. Never use high strength thread lock.


Removing an Old Servo

Refer to Steps 1 & 2 above to remove the servo horn from the installed servo.

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STEP 3. Open the radio box using a 2 mm wrench (it may vary by model). With the lid removed, you will be able to carefully unplug the servo lead from the receiver. Again, be careful so that you do not damage the receiver and its internal circuit board. The servo lead (wires connecting it to the receiver) may be attached to the chassis in some places with cable ties. It is essential that you be extremely careful when cutting any cable ties as you could easily damage the small wires.

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STEP 4. Before removing the servo, take note as to which side the output shaft sits. The servo itself is retained by four screws. These may be Phillips or hex. Some screws may have built-in wide shoulders and others may have washers. Either way, carefully put this hardware aside. The servo can now be removed and set aside.

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STEP 5. Place the new servo on its mounting plate. Servos can vary in size, but Axial vehicles have adjustable servo mounts. If you do need to adjust the servo mount (one is in a fixed position and one adjusts), the process is the same on SCX10 and Wraith, which all feature servos mounted directly on the front axle. On these vehicles, with the new servo set aside, remove the mounting plate from the axial. You can make this process easier by disconnecting the upper links and the upper shock mounts. This will allow the axle assembly to pivot forward and give you much better access to the screws attaching the servo mounting plate to the axle. After you remove the servo mounting plate, turn it over and locate the screw securing the adjustable mount. To identify this mount, look for the screw going into an oval shaped hole. The oval shape is what allows for the side-to-side adjustment for narrow or wide servos. Now, simply loosen the screw a small amount (usually a partial turn is all that’s needed) and test fit your new servo. Holding the servo in place, tighten the screw back down. Remove the servo and reinstall the servo mounting plate to the axle. You can now reconnect the upper links and shocks. If the male and female driveshaft pieces pulled apart, make sure it gets reconnected as well (before reconnecting the upper links).

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STEP 6. Slide the new servo into the mount, paying close attention to which side the output shaft sits. When working on an SCX10 or Wraith, and when viewed from the front, the output shaft is on the right-hand side. Secure the servo with the four screws that were holding the original servo in place. If the screw holes are stripped out and the screws cannot be fully tightened, you will need to replace the plastic servo mounts.

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STEP 7. The next step is routing the servo lead back to the radio box and receiver. Make sure the wires are not near any moving parts such as articulating suspension components or driveshafts. This is especially true if your Axial model has exposed gears. Small cable ties can be used to keep wires secure and out of harm’s way. Note that Axial includes provisions to secure wires on vehicles such as the SCX10 and SCX10 II. These should definitely be used to secure wiring.

Excessive wire should be neatly stored in the radio box. Do not make the wires too tight or they will get damaged as the suspension articulates. The wires should be slack enough to allow for complete suspension movement.

Once the wiring is complete, you reinstall the radio box lid. Some radio boxes are not fully sealed, but if you are using a sealed box, you should add grease to the area where the wires pass into the box.

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STEP 7. Finally reinstall the servo horn on the centered servo. Refer to STEP 7 above. Your servo swap is complete! You can now power up your radio and vehicle and go out for a drive.

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TIP: Radio Settings
You may need to slightly adjust your steering trim to get the vehicle to track straight with no input. If your transmitter has sub trim, this adjustment is used first.

If your transmitter has end-point adjustments, you should also use these to adjust how far the servo travels in either direction. A servo that turns farther than the steering system will allow can eventually burn out. The best tool to see if your servo is moving too far and straining is your ear. All servos, especially digital models, make an audible whine when pushing against a resistance. Bench test your steering. If you hear a whine at full lock in either direction, adjust the end points until you don’t hear a whine. If your transmitter doesn’t have end point adjustments, it may have dual rates, which also reduces steering throw, but does both sides simultaneously.

Jeeping with EctoVentures in Johnson Valley

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We were fortunate to be able to set up our base camp at the Lasernut Compound for the weekend which made for a great meeting spot. Our plan was to check out a new event called Rocktober taking place in Johnson Valley and to pre-run a route for HB Performance Offroad that we would be leading on Sunday. On Friday once camp was set we headed out to check out some new ground and then head over to Fissure Mtn Trail and run it from north to south. On Saturday we took a bit of a challenging way to get over and run Lower Big Johnson and then we headed over to mess around on Chocolate Thunder. And of course Saturday night included campfire story time with some friends that were out camping with us. On Sunday’s daybreak, we met for a quick drivers meeting at the Lasernut Compound and then headed over to Fissure Mtn. via a slightly challenging route. As we finished Fissure Mtn we stopped for lunch and decided to head over to Chocolate Thunder via Tack Hammer. As we set into the rocks on Chocolate Thunder we had a vehicle suffer a broken brake caliper bracket which forced us to band-aid him, turn back and head for home.

 

See more from EctoVentures on Facebook

 

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Video documentary of the Axial SCX10 Rubicon Trek

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Words/Photos: Rodney Wills

Back in 2013, we published a series of blog posts that I wrote documenting our efforts to take a bone-stock 1/10th scale Axial AX90028 SCX10™ 2012 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – RTR out of the box and drive it over the world renowned full-size Rubicon Trail.

Our Rubicon Trek took place in October of 2012, and those blog posts reflect each day’s events from start to finish. What those blog posts did not show is the video footage documenting this trip – until now! We have two video’s; one at 9-minutes long talking about the trip over video footage and the second one at 55-minutes that shows a lot more footage for your milk & cookies viewing pleasure.

The photos from that trip was purely secondary to the docu-trip as they were shot with a little Canon PowerShot SD1100 IS pocket camera carried in my pocket. The video camera and heavy duty tripod was the “heavy equipment” weighing in at 19-lbs. I did not shoot every square inch of the 15+ mile trail, so there was a lot of shoulder time with the camera as getting in-and-out of the Jeep was not practical as we had all the camp gear and equipment spread out in the Jeep once we were on trail. Regardless of the rigors I personally went through, I am very stoked to have the opportunity to plan, execute and document this trip. These videos reflect the Axial SCX10’s pure performance capabilities.

Need a jump-link to those previous blog post?
http://www.axialracing.com/blog_posts?cat=814

 

Todd Pearson’s 2017 Axialfest Best Of Show Doxy WWII Wrecker

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There are so many things to look forward to at Axialfest, but if you are a modeler at heart, concours is the day during this event you look forward to the most. The pavilion of Cisco Grove campground transforms into a modelers truck show. Modelers line up before being told to at the gate, with rigs in hand and an eye over their shoulder to see who built what. Lanes are set up and modelers place their prized rigs into a lane that matches up with the class they’ve built their rig for.  It’s a bit of a chaotic time, vehicles and owners are flooding in, cell phones are drawn, snapping photos, panning with video and instantly uploading to social media.

As the lanes fill up, judges start making their rounds and the chatter starts to begin between the participants and enthusiastic onlookers. “Whoa, look at that! Did you see that truck over there? That rig is insane! How did he make that?” These are all statements heard in the crowd and then it gets to; “the one.” The one most of the crowd saw, the one that stands out from the rest. If my mind serves me correct, it was less than an hour of concours being opened that several people had asked me if I saw the military wrecker? That military wrecker belonged to Todd Pearson and after staring at the machine in amazement I had to know more about it. Fast-forward to the end of concours, Todd and his military wrecker had deservedly taken home the 2017 Best of Show award. Now we all needed to know more about it! We were able to catch up with Todd and get all the details about his amazing build along with some close up photography.

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ABOUT THE BUILDER

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Name: Todd Pearson
Age: 47
Hometown: Chico, CA
Profession: Self Employed
Outside RC Hobbies: Rockhounding and Making Jewelry

HOBBY BACKGROUND

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When did you start in RC? 1980
What was your first RC vehicle? A Tamiya Tank and then a Tamiya Fast Attack!
What are your main RC interests (building, racing…?) I love anything RC related, I flew my first plane at age 8 and still fly today. I started racing RC cars in the late 80’s and still enjoy it on a weekly basis. I can fly helicopters and quads and of course I love rock crawling.
How much time a week do you spend on RC? My wife who I love dearly says I spend way too much time on RC!

THE RIG

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The name for your build? DOXY
What vehicle is your rig modeled after? Canadian Military Pattern (CMP) truck, with Chevrolet C15A 4×4 Crane (field adaptation.)
How much research went into the build? A Ton!
What is the frame/ did you start with a kit? This project started with a set of SCX10 frame rails. No modifications were made to the chassis
What drivline did you use? SSD
What axles did you use? SSD with all Axial internals

 

THE BODY

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What did the body start off as? Tamiya Wrangler
What materials were used to modify it? The cab was cut down 6-inches then I added styrene fenders and side steps. The front and rear windows and the interior were all custom scratch-built from styrene.
How long did the body take to complete? I can’t really guage time. I gave myself a year to complete this truck and enter it at Axialfest concourse.
Additional body modifications: The bed is real wood and the crane cage is steel. The crane is manually extendable for more boom reach. The winch works from the radio and is custom built; complete with scale chain.

THE DETAILS

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Tell us more about the external accessories, lighting and other hidden features? For lighting, I custom built the head and tail lights. The work light operates by a hidden switch. In the cab I used an SBC Toolbox and Ammo Can. I also had a scale topo-map of Cisco Grove and a Scale CMP Manual. On the outside of the truck I added scale rope, made a scale tow log, added a full size spare tire, Jerry cans, welding tanks and hoses and the fuel tank. The fuel tank is actually active and is what holds the variable speed smoke system.

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ELECTRONICS

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Radio System: KO PROPO with two receivers. One for driving and one for the smoke system.
Motor: Axial 27T
ESC: Axial
Servo: Protek 100T
Battery: ECO Power

PARTS USED
The big list of stuff…
SCX10 frame rails
SCX10 II transmission
Ebay transfer case
SSD Driveline
SSD D60 axles with Axial internals
Protek RC 100T servo
Two speed controls (one for driving and one for the smoke system)
Metal stamped beadlock wheels
RC4WD Mud Plugger tires
Full-size spare tire
Custom hand-made winch (chain driven)
Custom wood bed
Custom metal crane cage with extendable boom
Custom Wood tow log
Custom metal bumpers front and rear
Custom working smoke system (in the gas tank)
Custom lighting
Tamiya Wrangler cab (cut down 6in.)
Custom interior
Scale By Chris accessories

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THE EXPERIENCE
Give us a brief overview of driving the truck. Are you nervous when driving? What trails did you run on at Axialfest? Doxy never really made it out for any serious trail runs. We just kinda goofed off around the pavilion. On friday I left Doxy at my sponsors booth AMainHobbies.com and let everyone get a good look at the truck.

AXIALFEST MEMORABLE MOMENTS
Todd: Axialfest 2017, WOW what an awesome event this year! So much fun with family and friends. Last year I decided that I was going to build a tow truck for this year’s event and enter the concourse.

The idea for this truck was just to build something different and badass! I was never expecting to be rewarded for all the hard work and effort. The competition at Axialfest in all concours classes is incredible with some really crazy talented builders.

After all the judging, Doxy was chosen to be best of her class for 2017. I’m speechless and extremely honored to be able to win this award on my first attempt. Then even more incredible to be voted Best Of Show by all of the other class winners. What? Really! I’m so truly honored to be recognized for the time and effort. Thank you fellow builders and judges!

WHERE IS IT NOW?
Is this a shelf queen? Will you continue to drive it? Doxy will be out on some trails but most of the time she will be next to her trophy!

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FUTURE PLANS?
Will the truck stay as is, or will it continue to evolve? I’m done with this build and moving on to my 2018 secret project. Huge thanks to my family for supporting me on this project. And everyone else that was a part of the project.

SPECIAL THANKS
AMainHobbies,com
Proteck RC
ECO Power
Corey Koehler
Brad Juanarena
Shaun Klobas
Scale By Chris

SEE YOU NEXT YEAR
We’d like to thank Todd for taking the time to give us all of the details about Doxy and congratulate him for taking home the Best In Class and Best Of Show award at Axialfest 2017. We hope this story on Todd’s quest to build an amazing tow truck inspires you to build the truck of your dreams too. We suggest starting right now and we’ll see you in the concours lanes at Axialfest 2018!

The Perfect Fit: SORRCA Class 1 Ready SCX10 / SCX10 II | PART 6: TREADS

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In our mission to show you how the Axial SCX10 and SCX10 II are a perfect fit for SORRCA Class 1 events, we’ve organized the rules and broke them down into six total focus groups. We’ve reached the final focus and that is the wheels, tires and widths to fit your vehicle in. This topic requires some thought and product purchase choices will require work on your part to make sure your rig complies. Let’s dive in.

FOCUS 6: TREADS
SORRCA Rule • 106mm / 4.19″ Max tire size including spares.

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Looks like the Axial Perfect Fit has hit a snag. Unfortunately, the treads within the Axial tire line-up are on the larger side of the SORRCA rule and therefore you’ll need to search for tires that fit this rule and your traction needs. If you are trying to keep that factory look, consider using a licensed wheel from the Axial selection HERE.


 

SORRCA Rule • Wheels must be aligned within the body wheel wells (center of wheels to center of wheel wells +/- 1/2 inch total combined)

SORRCA Rule • The tread of the tires cannot extend outside of the wheel wells more than 1/2 of the tread width, flairs can be added to reach minimum spec.

Team KNK Hardware TTC4 2017-88
When choosing your wheel and tire combination, you’ll want to make certain that the wheel off-set is correct, consider hex hub widths, and tire overhang on the rim so it does not exceed the measurements provided by SORRCA. The vehicle above has wheels that are obviously outside of the body width; this rig would not fit within SORRCA’s rules.


SORRCA Rule • Tires can never extend beyond the body’s bumpers or the rear of any truck bed. (Any stingers,fairleads, shackles, bolts, etc. are not considered part of a bumper when determining this.)

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As Axial SCX10 and SCX10 II’s arrive from the factory, the wheels and tires are located behind the bumpers. When lengthening links or altering bumper positions, you’ll want to make sure the wheels will still fit behind the bumper. If you are making modifications as such, make sure you fit within some of the previous rules mentioned in our series like sectioning and bobbing.


 

SORRCA Rule • Gates will be a minimum of 11″ wide (so mind your width).

Team KNK Hardware TTC4 2017-165

Gate width plays a key role in determining the width of your trail rig once you start customizing. The stock SCX10 width is 8.8” and the SCX10 is 8.9” which will leave some space to clear gates as long as your wheel and tire choice combination result in a factory width in order to fit under the body. If you choose a combination that is wider, you’re putting the squeeze on your rig through the gates. A bigger concern is the angles in which you need to proceed through some gates if a minimum 11” gate is used. Things can get tight.

GET SORRCA READY
That wraps up the series on the Axial SCX10/ SCX10 II Perfect Fit for SORRCA blog focus. SORRCA has done an excellent job in providing guidelines for everyone to follow so the rigs stay scale and the competition stays close. Our descriptions of how scale Axial trucks fit into these rule sets has been interpereted and presented to the best of our knowledge. Both Axial trail truck platforms continue to be the perfect choice for drivers who want to drive scale, customize with ease and tackle the trails with commanding performance.

 

The Perfect Fit: SORRCA Class 1 Ready SCX10 / SCX10 II | PART 5: BED

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Throughout this series, we discussed how the out of the box 2000 Jeep® Cherokee 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – RTR and 2000 Jeep® Cherokee 1/10th Scale Electric 4WD – Kit fit within SORRCA guidlines right out of the box with no additional work on your part. With slight modifications, other Axial SCX10 based rigs can be easily altered to fit within those guidlines using Axial accessories. Our fifth focus on getting your SCX10/ SCX10 II Class 1 ready discusses truck bed rules and what they mean if you decide to add a truck type body to your trail machine.

FOCUS 5: BED

SORRCA Rule • Bobbing a truck bed is allowed, but must follow all body specs.

An example of "Bobbing" a bed would be to remove the material between the two red lines on the body above. After the material is removed, the tail-gate is reattached to the bed.

An example of “Bobbing” a bed would be to remove the material between the two red lines on the NuKizer body above. After the material is removed, the tail-gate is reattached to the bed.

Bobbing a truck bed is the practice of removing a section of the bed from the left to right side between the rear wheel-well and tailgate. This reduction in the overhang lessens the chances of the bed dragging on the ground during an ascent or hanging up on an obstacle as you cross it. The Jeep NuKizer 715 Body,Jeep Mighty FC Body and 2015 Ram 2500 Power Wagon would be examples of Axial truck bodies with beds that “could” be Bobbed. But these vehicles already have short rear sections and the implications of reattaching a Lexan tailgate on bed with minimal performance gain detours most custom modelers. Bobbing can’t be done on an XJ or Wrangler body either as this falls into the sectioning rule discussed in Part 4 of this series.


 

SORRCA Rule • Dovetailing is not allowed.

Dovetail

Dovetailing is the practice of angling the fenders in towards the center of the vehicle. This requires the center section of the hood or bed to be narrowed at the end and remains wider at the center of the vehicle. Dovetailing improves clearance of the vehicle when approaching obstacles on the trail. Factory Axial bodies are designed to look scale with approval from licensing partners so the vehicle is represented properly. Any Axial scale body will conform to this rule unless you modify it.


 

SORRCA Rule • Truggies are not allowed. Flatbeds with full length rail chassis are allowed. The bed must be as wide as the cab the entire length of the bed. Cab only not allowed.

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Truggies look pretty cool, we’ll admit it, hint hint Honcho! But unfortunately the Honcho body from Axial would not fit into Class 1 SORCCA rules. A truggy is made up of a cab with a cage style rear bed, a specialized vehicle you would hardly ever see on the road. Flatbeds however are seen on the roads so there is no stopping you in locating a Honcho body or using the cab from the Dodge Ram and fitting a custom made flatbed to your SCX10. Keep in mind that the flatbed must run the length of the frame rails and must be as wide as the body you use.

GET SORRCA READY
When getting your SCX10 model ready for a SORRCA event, many will be able to skip this focus here when using a factory XJ, Rubicon, or Wrangler unlimited Axial body. But Axial does offer options for you to get creative with traditional bed equippped truck offerings so you can customize your rig to fit your scale taste. Just one more SORRCA Class 1 Focus to go, and there we will discuss treads. Keep an eye out!

The Perfect Fit: SORRCA Class 1 Ready SCX10 / SCX10 II | PART 4: BODY

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We left you hanging there in Part 3 didn’t we? We tell you not to modify the body and then tell you about a follow up blog on Body Mods. Well, here we are to show you a little can be done and some things to completely steer clear from doing. SORRCA in efforts to keep rigs on the trail in a recognizable scale form has determined performance gaining modifications like boat siding and sectioning bodies will not be permitted within the Class 1 rules. Here are some details to consider when preparing your Axial SCX10 or SCX10 II for a SORRCA event.

FOCUS 4: BODY MODS

SORRCA Rule • Boat sides are not allowed.

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The flat sides of the SCX10™ II 2017 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited CRC edition conform to the SORRCA rule set.

Ok Gilligan, you can’t modify your ship in order to run it ashore. Boat siding is a process in which the lower rocker panel and sometime door area is bent to an inward facing angle. This is done to help gain body ground clearance and also allow the body to glide over rocks and obstacles rather than possibly getting hung up. The angle of the modified panel simulates the angled hull of the boat which is how the name came about. All of Axial’s bodies from the 2000 Jeep® Cherokee, to the 2012 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon and even the new 2017 Jeep® Wrangler Unlimited CRC all have body sides perpendicular to the ground and fit within the rules. Resist the urge to tweak your Axial body with a pair of seaming pliers and you’re good to go.


 

SORRCA Rule  • Any removal of material from behind the front wheel well (except trim/molding) is considered a boat side.

Cutting the body along the red line would be considered 'Boat Siding."

Cutting the body along the red line would be considered ‘Boat Siding.”

Put the scissors down and step away from the body. It is ok to trim your fender flares or molding from the body, but in doing so, make certain not to remove material from the fender on an angle greater than the removed flare. Simply altering the angle of the wheel-well opening is considered boat siding and can gain an advantage on the trail as well as take away from the scale look SORRCA is trying to maintain. 


 

SORRCA Rule • Sectioning or narrowing of the body is not allowed.

Trug

Sectioning and narrowing a body, although more commonly practiced on ABS hardbodies because they are easier to glue back together is a way to reduce the chances of the body hanging up on rocks and obstacles. In this practice you are physically taking material away from the body in order to gain precious clearance that can help you gain an advantage. In doing so, you take away from the realistic scale appearance of a factory look.

 

GET SORRCA READY
If you are looking for every advantage possible during a SORRCA event, running factory Axial bodies with minor tweaks is an advantage. Consider the lightweight Lexan SCX10 II Jeep Cherokee XJ or Jeep Rubicon or Jeep Wrangler Unlimited with the flares removed. This will give you additional wheel clearance that could make a difference on the trails. On to Part 5; bed time…