New To RC – Deadbolt Box To Backyard Guide

Deadbolt_Box_BackyardGuide

Starting your RC adventure is easy with any Axial ready to run kit. Here we’re going to show you just how easy it is. In only the time it takes to charge your battery, we’ll show you how to get an SCX10 Deadbolt from the box to the backyard.

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You’ve selected the SCX10 Deadbolt! What drew you in? The bright green body, the poise of the driver figure or perhaps it was the light bar on the roof? Whatever the reason, this radio control machine is based on one of the most popular chassis’ in radio control and it will deliver nonstop adventures wherever you take it.

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Before you tear into that box… well, you probably did already and we don’t blame you. But the first step in getting your adventure under-way should actually be directed towards your battery. During your purchase, you’ve selected a battery and charger for your Deadbolt. Now is a great time to read through your specific charger manual, setup and charge your new battery. It’s going to take some time to charge, so get the process going while you get into your Deadbolt kit.

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Now you can dive into the box and depending on which end you open first, you’ll most likely be greeted with some of the kit contents. Here is the included Tactic TTX300 radio in a protective bubble pack, the radio and kit manual, and a bag of parts. We’ll get into the parts bag later.

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Next you can slide the Deadbolt out of the box. Get excited!

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Like many boxed items, you’ll need a pair of strong scissors or cutters to cut the zip-ties holding the Deadbolt to the inner box.

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There it is, your new Deadbolt nearly ready for action, the rig comes assembled, body painted and electronics installed. There are only a few steps to get it ready for action.

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Wait! We know you want to dive in, but take a few moments to read through the included manuals. The Axial team spends a lot of time on the manual to explain everything you need to know about your new model.

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Batteries! Here we go, its time to install some fresh AA batteries in the Tactic TTX300 radio. The radio only requires 4 cells. To access the battery tray, slide the cover off the bottom of the radio. Next make certain you note how the cells are inserted. There will be a diagram in the battery tray that indicates how the batteries are installed.

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Time to remove the body in order to install the battery to power your Deadbolt. There will be two body retaining clips in the front and two in the rear. Simply slide them out and set them aside.

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Once the body is removed, you’ll notice a tag with some information. Yes, you should read it too. This is a quick start tag that gives you information on how the electronic speed control is set and how to turn your truck on and off.

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This is a good time to familiarize yourself with the SCX10. Your manual has a diagram of the trucks major components. It is a good idea to look at the diagram and the rig to get to know all of the parts.

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Each Axial kit comes with the electronic speed control set to LiPo mode for use with Lithium Polymer batteries. This is done as a safety measure so the battery does not go below a certain voltage that can damage the battery. If you chose to use a NiMh battery, it will work in LiPo mode, but not as efficiently as if it were in NiMh mode. Switching your ESC between modes isn very easy by simply moving the “jumper” to the mode that corresponds with your battery.

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Once you’ve adjusted the jumper on the ESC if necessary, you can install your fully charged battery. Loosen the Velcro® straps on the battery plate and slide the battery in. Then pull the straps tight to secure the battery and firmly press the Velcro® together.

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We’re getting close to running! Turn your attention to the radio and locate the On/Off switch on the back of the radio. Switch the radio “On” and make certain the power LED indicator is illuminated on the top of the radio.
TIP: Your radio should always be turned on first and off last to insure you always have control of your RC vehicle.

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Now the Deadbolt is ready to be powered on. This is done by connecting the battery to the ESC. This is your On/Off switch. Use the plug connection to turn it on and unplug the battery to turn the model off.
TIP: Two wire guides are located on the chassis frame rail. These clips can be used to secure wires.

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Almost ready to run; place the body back on the chassis and install the four body clips back on the posts to secure the body. Now you’re ready to head outside for your adventure!

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If you’re completely New To RC, take some time to familiarize yourself with the radio functions and how the Deadbolt responds. Start with the steering, turn the wheel in both directions. Note when standing behind the vehicle, steering left will turn the truck left, but when the vehicle is coming at you, this will be reversed. Don’t worry, you’ll get used to it quickly. Now find an open space and try the throttle. The throttle is proportional, so just pull the trigger slightly so the truck rolls forward. While at a slow speed, make large right turn ovals. After a few right turn ovals, make a few left turn ovals. After your comfortable with ovals. Try figure 8’s. During this practice session, try various speeds and various amounts of steering to get used to your model. The ESC is equipped with reverse too, try it a few times before heading to the nearest pile of rocks or hiking trail.

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Once you are used to how your model operates, you can start your off-road adventures!

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Whoa! What about all of those spare parts? You didn’t think we forgot about them did you? The bag of parts you find in the kit are the extras from the part trees used to build your specific kit. These are parts that are used in other variations of Axial kits. These parts can come in handy, so keep them on hand in case you start customizing your rig. You’ll also notice some additional driver heads, these can be glued together with model glue and painted to give your Deadbolt a unique look. You’ll also receive two green gate markers you can place on trail obstacles to make your challenge a bit more intense. And finally there will be a T-wrench used to remove various nuts on the chassis as well as the wheel nuts.

 

How To – Program Your ESC For NiMH Batteries

 

Program_NiMH_Batteries

Axial’s Ready-to-Run (RTR) vehicles are true hobby-grade products and, as such, they use sophisticated electronic components. One of the primary advantages to such high-tech gear is adjustability and an area of adjustability includes battery type. Axial’s electronic speed controls (ESCs) are designed to be used with a variety of battery chemistry types and can, and should, be adjusted for the type of battery you’re using.

IMPORTANT NOTE: As a safety measure, Axial uses the LiPo setting as the default setting on the ESC, but NiMH batteries, are often recommended for use with RTRs. NiMH batteries will provide best performance when the ESC is used in NiMH mode.

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LiPo batteries must be run with the ESC set in LiPo for safe use. This isn’t optional. When properly set in LiPo mode, Axial ESCs are designed to eliminate the chance of over discharging the battery and permanently damaging it, which is a potential safety issue. As such, LiPo batteries should never be used in any other mode other than LiPo mode on the ESC.

NiMH batteries will work in LiPo mode, but there will be a noticeable reduction in performance that will suddenly become apparent as the pack starts to lose voltage (discharge). This is because LiPo mode has what is called LiPo cutoff or low voltage cutoff. As the voltage drops in the NiMH pack, it is still delivering usable power, but the LiPo cutoff engages and impairs performance. The LiPo cutoff is designed to reduce power to the motor in order to keep the battery at a safe minimum voltage. Let’s go over setting up NiMh mode on the various Axial ESC offerings so you can get maximum performance when using this type of battery.


 

axial ae-2 esc

AE-2. The AE-2 is a brushed motor speed control. While Castle Creation’s Castle Link system can be used to link the ESC up to a computer (availabe as an aftermarket item,) for ease of use, the AE-2 can be programmed manually by using the throttle trigger on your transmitter to indicate yes or or no to selections as you scroll through each option. To get the best performance when using a NiMH, the ESC should be programmed to operate in NiMH mode.

When programming, as a safety measure, remove the pinion from the motor. This will prevent the gears and/or vehicle from moving and causing damage to the vehicle or you. Turn the transmitter on and then connect a freshly charged battery to the ESC. Hold full throttle and turn on the ESC. You will hear four tones from the ESC and then another four tones. After the second series of four tones, release the throttle. The ESC will beep twice indicating you’re in programming mode.

There are three settings that can be adjusted on the AE-3. Each setting, in turn, has a varying number of options. You will use your transmitter’s throttle to select yes (full throttle) or no (full brake) for each option. When you select yes, the next setting will come up. Every time you select no, you will toggle to the next option within that setting. When you select yes or no, wait for a continuous tone and let the throttle go to neutral. If you selected yes, the ESC will go to the next setting.

To change to NiMH mode, you will need to go to the first setting. Remember, LiPo batteries must be used LiPo mode.

Setting 1 LiPo Cutoff
Option 1: None (NiMH mode)
Option 2: Auto-LiPo*

Setting 2 Drag Brake
Option 1: Disabled
Option 2: 15%
Option 3: 25%
Option 4: 40%
Option 5: 50%
Option 6: 100%*

3: Brake/Reverse Type
Option 1: Reverse enabled (2-second lockout)
Option 2: Reverse disabled
Option 3: Forward/Brake/Reverse*
* = Default factory setting

For additional reference, view the manual: HERE


 

axial ae-3 esc

Vanguard AE-3. The Vanguard AE-3 is a brushless motor speed control. It comes preprogrammed in the “Auto-LiPo” mode. Like the AE-2, you can use the Castle-Link to program the ESC with your PC, but you can also manually program the ESC with your transmitter.

When programming, as a safety measure, remove the pinion from the motor. This will prevent the gears and/or vehicle from moving and causing damage to the vehicle or you. Turn the transmitter on and then connect a freshly charged battery to the ESC. Hold full throttle and then turn on the ESC. You will hear four tones from the ESC and then another four tones. After the second series of four tones, release the throttle. The ESC will beep twice indicating you’re in programming mode.

There are nine settings that can be adjusted. Each setting, in turn, has a varying number of options. You will use your transmitter’s throttle to select yes (full throttle) or no (full brake) for each option. When you select yes, the next setting will come up. Every time you select no, you will toggle to the next option within that setting. When you select yes or no, wait for a continuous tone and let the throttle go to neutral. If you selected yes, the ESC will go to the next setting.

To change to NiMH mode, you will need to go through settings one through six to get to setting seven, which changes the battery mode. Remember, LiPo batteries must be used LiPo mode.

Setting 1 Brake/Reverse Type
Option 1: With Reverse*
Option 2: Without Reverse
Option 3: Crawler Reverse. No delay from throttle to brake to reverse.

Setting 2 Brake Amount
Option 1: 25% Power
Option 2: 50% Power*
Option 3: 75% Power
Option 4: 100% Power

Setting 3 Reverse Amount
Option 1: 25% Power
Option 2: 50% Power*
Option 3: 75% Power
Option 4: 100% Power

Setting 4 Punch/Traction Control
Option 1: High
Option 2: Medium
Option 3: Low
Option 4: Lowest
Option 5: Disabled*

Setting 5 Drag Brake
Option 1: Drag Brake off*
Option 2: Drag Brake 10%
Option 3: Drag Brake 20%
Option 4: Drag Brake 30%
Option 5: Drag Brake 40%

Setting 6 Dead Band
Option 1: Large – 0.1500 ms
Option 2: Normal – 0.1000 ms*
Option 3: Small – 0.0750 ms
Option 4: Very Small – 0.0500 ms
Option 5: Smallest – 0.0250 ms

Setting 7 Cutoff Voltage
Option 1: No low-voltage cutoff
Option 2: Auto-Lipo*
Option 3: 5v
Option 4: 6v
Option 5: 9v
Option 6: 12v

Setting 8 Motor Timing
Option 1: Lowest
Option 2: Normal*
Option 3: Highest

Setting 9 Motor Type
Option 1: Brushless*
Option 2: Brushed Reversing
Option 3: Brushed High Power
* = Default factory setting

For additional reference, view the manual: HERE


 

axial ae-5 esc

AE-5. The AE-5 is a brushed speed control and is by far the easiest ESC to program. To switch from the factory LiPo mode, remove the “jumper” and move it over one position. Not only is this ESC easy to program, it’s also waterproof.

For additional reference, view the manual: HERE

Axial AE-5


 

ae-1

AE-1. Axial’s AE-1 ESC does not have a LiPo cutoff. If you use LiPo batteries in a vehicle equipped with an AE-1 ESC you must use a separate LiPo low-voltage cut-off device. Axial does not sell a separate LiPo cut-off device, so the best choice would be to upgrade to an ESC such as the Axial AE-5 (see above), which is extremely easy to program and waterproof.

How To: Install Beef Patties in Method Beadlock Wheels

Install Beef Patties

 

Running weights in the front wheels of your trail rig or rocker racer can have significant benefits such as a lower center of gravity and improved stability.  After searching through options that would work with my Altra 5K Bomber Build, I came across these Beef Patties made by the same company that made the Beef Tubes I used inside my axles on the Bomber Build. The Beef Patties add 4.5 ounces to the front.  These along with the Beef Tubes inside my axles increased axle weight by 6 ounces.  These are not made specifically for the Axial Method Beadlock wheels, but they can be installed with minimal modification.

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As you can see, the hubs don’t quite slide into the Beef Patties.  The hubs are just about 1mm too large in diameter, so a little sanding is necessary.

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I used some 60 grit. It made quick work of the job.  Just a few passes on each nub is enough.

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I stopped and checked clearance, almost there.  I just needed another pass on the sandpaper.

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Boom, slid in like a glove.IMG_20170602_163046

The Beef Patties fit perfectly in behind the wheels.

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Beef Tubes includes longer beefier hardware to mount them up. You can just see them poking out behind the spokes.

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Best part is they are a close match to the color of all the aluminum bling on my Altra 5K Bomber.  You know bling is important, because it adds 3hp per bling. I’ve already done a test run and am very happy with the improved crawling and handling.  Definitely a great, quick, and easy hop up to improve the stability of your RR10 or other rig.

More Information: Beef Patties

Bomber Adventure – Skeeno Completes an Altra Ultra 5K Enduro

Skeeno Completes an Altra Ultra 5K

Words and photos by: Matt ‘Skeeno’ Soileau
Guest photography by: The Great Dominic Longoria

IMG_20170930_113508The ScaleUltra.com tour made a stop in Reno, Nevada recently, so I finally got a chance to redeem myself after having to DNF in the Altra Ultra 5K Enduro at Axialfest 2017 due to a broken servo. If you’re not familiar with this race, you can read up on it’s history here: Altra Ultra 5K History

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Since the Altra Ultra 5K Enduro is a self supported race, I needed to make sure I had what I needed to finish. First up was making sure I had enough mAh to power my RR10 Bomber for over 3 miles. You can learn more about mAh/mile here: mAh/Mile  I didn’t take any chances and charged up all my batteries, 15,800mAh! I hoped it would be enough.  I also packed my tools and water into my hydration pack.

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The next morning when I arrived, there was already a good sized crowd gathered at the Wild West Motorsports Complex.

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The Altra Ultra 5K Enduro was part of a larger event hosted by CKRC Hobbies that included comp crawlers, rock racing, and scale trails. CKRC’s Jason Copeland was handling the sign ups and even had some tasty doughnuts for anyone that wanted them.  I wanted them, but decided I better refrain since I was about to run/jog/speed-walk/hike for over 3 miles. I did grab one after I finished, and they were delicious.

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It was easy to find the race coordinator with this sweet wrapped Sprinter van. I couldn’t resist a quick photo with my Bomber. Also, that guy is wearing my favorite Altra model, the Lone Peak 2.5.

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Mr. Chris Cru Jones was already set up and taking entries. Check out those sweet decals from S.O.R. Graphics. What’s that stuff behind Chris?

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Those are some sweet finishing prizes, hats, windbreakers, Camelbaks, kits, RTRs, and my favorite…

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…these Axial Adventure sweatshirts.  XL too, just my size.

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You probably recognize these 801 legends, MikeyT and PaulieB!

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Mr. Chris Cru Jones gave us a quick driver’s meeting, so we all knew the rules. The rules are pretty basic, finish as fast as you can.

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Can you find the Skeeno Bomber?

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Mandatory group photo of the Fourteen Fuegos. Don’t be scared to come run an Altra Ultra 5K Enduro, you don’t really have to run the entire time.  My goal was to keep a good pace and finish.

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Here’s a POV shot what it’s like to run a Altra Ultra 5K Enduro. It’s amazing how the difficulty level is raised when you are trying to hustle down the trail and drive at the same time.  It’s hard to watch your driving line and running line at the same time.  I can’t tell you how many times I center punched a rock with my front differential because I wasn’t watching my Bomber for a second.

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The first part of this race was a pretty good climb to the top of this hill, 500′ of climbing in .3 mile. According to my Strava data, it was a 25-30% grade.

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Luckily, there were some fun technical sections near the top to take your mind off the climbing.

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Almost to the top here.

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Those flags are the top, thank goodness!

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I was feeling it already and this was only the first lap.  There were three laps in this race.

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Ok, just kidding.  That wasn’t the top.  It was a false peak, and there was one last climb to the summit. That’s my trail-buddy, Tony Mazza down there.

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He was getting close to these flagstone kickers.  It’s probably not the wise choice, but jumping was the fun choice.

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I even waited to catch a photo of Mr. Mazza’s Bomber taking the jump.

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We trail-raced at the summit for a while, so I could catch a few photos.

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Ol’ Mista Werty was commissioned to be course marshal at the midway point.  I’m not sure why he has that umbrella, I don’t see any rain clouds in the sky.

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After the summit, we turned and headed back towards the start.

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Mr. Mazza left me in his dust when I stopped to refuel my Bomber.  Maybe I need to rethink my battery capacity.  5000mAh packs sound like a better choice than the 2200mAh packs I usually run.

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You can see the start at the top, left of this picture. That’s about half a mile from here according to my Strava.

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There was some fun technical sections back here.  Here Mighty Mike T.  pops an ollie down this section.

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Mikey T. was pretty pleased with his performance, so much so that he even paused for a photo for me.

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When arriving at this section the second time, I quickly ran over to the Dominic Longoria of CKRC requested he catch some photos of me while he was live streaming.

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Dom took some great shots for trying to execute two film duties at once all while commentating. You are a great multitasker, Mr. Longoria.

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I remember that rock trying to trip me, but my Altra Lone Peak 3.0′s kept me sure footed.

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After an exciting event, I was excited to finish in the Top 10. When looking at my lap times, it was clear my decision to run lower capacity 2200mAh batteries as well as stop to take photos affected my time.  These choices slowed me down, and without them, I think I would have cut almost 10 minutes off my lap times and finished several places higher.  Perhaps I’ll rethink my strategy at the next Altra Ultra 5K Enduro.

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So who wound up on top? Mike Thompson wearing the number 20 took home the win in a time of 1:08:21 with his personal fast lap being 22:03.7.  The “Altra Hot Lap” winner was Brandon Copeland (17) who set a blistering pace of 18.44 and finished second overall in 1:09:41.1. Taking the final podium spot was Paul Blackner (19) finishing in 1:14:11.9 and clicked off a personal fast lap of 23:03. Congrats on your finishes and walking home with some impressive Axial and Altra prizes. Congratulations are also in order for everyone who participated in the event as well as the staff behind the show. Now, will we see you at the next Altra Ultra 5K?

Find out more about Altra Ultra 5K Events:
ULTRA 5K ENDURO HISTORY
Athletic RC Adventure Mashup – Inside the Axialfest Altra Ultra 5K Enduro

50th BFGoodrich Tires SCORE Baja 1000 – The History

SCORE_Baja1000

Article Credit: SCORE® International
Photos By: getsomephoto.com

As we take our Axial Yeti™ SCORE® Trophy Trucks® out to play day after day, this year, above all others, we should stop for a minute to take a look at how the truck came to be.
The Axial SCORE® Truck was inspired by the full-scale trucks that have been racing in the BFGoodrich® Tires SCORE® Baja 1000, 2017 marks the 50th anniversary of this monumental event that changed the face of off-road racing.

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Photo Credit: getsomephoto.com

The long history of the event is surrounded by dedication and passion from its inception by the hands of the Legendary Mickey Thompson, to today’s SCORE® International organization. As the 50th Baja 1000 race draws near on November 12-18, SCORE® International has posted the lineage of the event along with incredible facts describing the highs, lows and background that has shaped this event to what it is today.

Much, much more than just a race, history shines brightly on next month’s 50th BFGoodrich Tires SCORE Baja 1000 pre-race festivities for final round of four-race 2017 SCORE World Desert Championship  includes SEMA SCORE Baja 1000 Experience, presented by BFGoodrich Tires Oct. 30-Nov. 3 at Las Vegas Convention Center; SCORE Baja 1000 qualifying for SCORE Trophy Truck at Las Vegas Motor Speedway Off-Road Track at 6 p.m. Oct. 31; Granddaddy of All Desert Races to be televised on El Rey Network.

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Photo Credit: getsomephoto.com

ENSENADA, Mexico— As the World Series is to baseball, the Super Bowl to football and the World Cup to soccer, the legendary SCORE Baja 1000 continues to stand as tall at the pinnacle of the motorsports world today as it did when it began 50 years ago. It is aptly referred to as the Granddaddy of All Desert Races. This year’s historic 50th golden anniversary race, sponsored for the first time by BFGoodrich Tires, will be held Nov. 12-18. It will start in the heart of Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico covering much of the majestic Baja California peninsula. It will finish in La Paz, Baja California Sur. It will be the 50th anniversary of the race shrouded in mystery that continues to lure the world’s best racers and adventurers from around the globe who all continue to share the dream to conquer the Baja. Racer registration continues at www.score-international.com for the iconic race. The race is the season-finale of the four-race 2017 SCORE World Desert Championship

ROOTS It’s the oldest and most well known of all desert races, and it remains as the single most appealing accomplishment to a driver. Since 1967, the mother of all desert races has been run over the mysterious, majestic Baja California peninsula every year except 1974 when an international fuel crisis forced a cancellation. The SCORE Baja 1000 has captured the imagination of the entire world as entries have come not only from every state in the United States, the District of Columbia and U.S. territories Guam and Puerto Rico, but also has attracted racers from Argentina, Australia, Austria, Bahamas, Brazil, Belgium, Canada, Chile, Columbia, China, Cyprus, England, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Guatemala, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Lithuania, Morocco, New Caledonia, New Zealand, Netherlands, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, Uruguay, Yugoslavia as well as the host country of Mexico. Over the years, SCORE races have been televised in more than 100 nations worldwide.

PRELUDE The first known record run occurred in 1962. Dave Ekins and Bill Robertson Jr. timed their trip from Tijuana to La Paz on a pair of Honda 250 motorcycles. Ekins made it in 39 hours, 54 minutes, Robertson in less than an hour slower. There were no official timers, of course, and to establish that they had made the trip, the two motorcycle racers time-stamped a sheet of paper in the Tijuana telegraph office and time-stamped it again at the telegraph office when they arrived in La Paz. They began their journey at midnight in Tijuana. Capitalizing on the pioneer effort of Ekins and Robertson, Chevrolet commissioned car builder Bill Stroppe to prepare a small fleet of trucks for the run to La Paz. Late that year they left Long Beach, Calif., and all of them reached La Paz. Advertising and publicity campaigns heralded the feat as “the roughest run under the sun.”

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Photo Credit: getsomephoto.com

STILL NO. 1 For the last two years, readers of USA Today newspaper have voted the SCORE Baja 1000 as the No. 1 motorsports event in the world. “Without the SCORE Baja 1000, there just wouldn’t be any desert racing,” said Roger Norman, SCORE International’s President and CEO. “The SCORE Baja 1000 continues to draw interest from all over the world and we now find second, third and even fourth generation racers appearing at the starting line with their family patriarchs cheering for their off-spring. This event continues to be the focal point of the SCORE World Desert Championship each year the celebration of our 50th anniversary will surely add another colorful chapter to the golden legacy of the SCORE Baja 1000.” 1967 Enthusiast Ed Pearlman founded the National Off Road Racing Association (NORRA) and established the Mexican 1000. It started officially in Tijuana on October 31, 1967 with 68 entries. They actually motored at leisure speeds to Ensenada and restarted the next day. NORRA continued to organize the Mexican 1000, which came to be known as the Baja 1000. In 1968, Pearlman moved the start of the race to Ensenada, where it stayed with one exception until 1993. In 1972 NORRA started at Mexicali and ran the first half of the race down the east coast of the peninsula through the treacherous Three Sisters section. Pre-running for this race, Parnelli Jones and Walker Evans were among a group of competitors who nearly got swept out to sea during a tropical storm. NORRA’s last race was in 1972. At that point, Mexican officials revoked NORRA’s permits to stage races in Baja. In 1973, a domestic group called the Baja Sports Committee produced the race.

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Photo Credit: getsomephoto.com

NEW BEGINNINGS After the fuel crisis of 1974 forced local officials to cancel the event, SCORE International, founded by the late Mickey Thompson and headed soon after by Sal Fish (until 2012), was invited by the northern state of Baja California to hold the race in 1975. The SCORE Baja 1000 became a loop event starting and ending in Ensenada. Roger Norman purchased SCORE International from Fish on Dec. 20, 2012. In 1979, the government of Baja California Sur granted permission to resume the Ensenada-to-La Paz format and SCORE has used this route intermittently ever since. The 1979 race was notable for Walker Evans’ overall win in a Dodge truck, the first truck to win the overall title of the race.

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Photo Credit: getsomephoto.com

START/FINISH In its first 49 years, the SCORE Baja 1000 has started 42 times in Ensenada, three times in Mexicali (1972, 1993, 1994), twice in Tijuana (1967, 1995) once in Santo Tomas (1998) and once in Ojos Negros (1999). The legendary race has finished in Ensenada 24 times, in La Paz 20 times, in Mexicali two times (1993, 1994), twice in Cabo San Lucas (2000, 2007) and once in Ojos Negros (1999).

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Photo Credit: getsomephoto.com

FAMOUS The famous and not-so-famous have tried their hand at conquering the Baja and they have come from all walks of life. Mark Thatcher, son of Great Britain’s then-prime minister Margaret Thatcher, raced in the 1982 SCORE Baja 1000. Celebrities James Garner, Ted Nugent and the late Steve McQueen all battled the Baja in the early 1970s and many racers from other forms of motorsports crossed over to try their skills. Among the drivers from other arenas who have tested the Baja were Indy Car racers Rick and Roger Mears, Parnelli Jones, Danny Ongias, Danny Sullivan, Jimmy Vasser, Buddy Rice, Sebastien Bourdais, Oriol Servia, Roberto Guerrero, Michel Jourdain Jr., Johnny Unser and Mike and Robbie Groff, NASCAR’s Robby Gordon, Jimmie Johnson, Boris Said and Brendan Gaughan, SCCA legend Elliot Forbes-Robinson, World Rally Championships’ Armin Schwarz, Armin Kremer, Andreas Aigner and Harri Pavanpera,, world motorcycle champions Malcolm Smith, Larry Roeseler and Destry Abbott, Motocross legends Ricky Johnson and Jeremy McGrath, XGames star Travis Pastrana, drag racers Don Prudhomme and Larry Minor and legendary SCORE founder and motorsports innovator Mickey Thompson. The late Academy Award winning actor, racer and race team owner Paul Newman raced in the 2004 event. Jesse James, of ‘Monster Garage’ fame, and Hollywood film and TV star Patrick Dempsey both have raced in this classic several times.

LEGENDS This year’s race will commemorate the achievements of legendary desert racers like Rod Hall, Ron Bishop, Johnny Johnson, and Larry Roeseler. Hall, who will turn 80 on Nov. 22, has a record 24 class wins (including one overall win in 1969), and is the only racer who has competed in all 49 SCORE Baja 1000 races. Bishop was the only racer who competed in the first 40 SCORE Baja 1000 races all on a motorcycle. Hall will be racing this year in the Stock Full class with his son Chad Hall as he attempts to add to his untouchable legacy. Bishop, now deceased, was the only racer who competed every year of the first 40 on a motorcycle. Johnson, now retired, had 15 class wins, amazingly in eight different classes. Roeseler, has won 17 times in this race, including 13 overall wins (10 on a motorcycle). Roeseler will share driving duties this year in SCORE Trophy Truck with Luke McMillin in the No. 83 Ford F-150. Roeseler won the unlimited Class 1 for four consecutive years (2004-2007), driving with the youngest of three racing brothers, Troy Herbst, in the Smithbuilt-Ford open-wheel desert race car that was known as the ‘Land Shark’. Roeseler is the only racer in the history of the event to win the overall 4-wheel in a truck and also in a car as well as the overall 2-wheel title as well. In 2008, Roeseler split the driving with driver of record and team owner and now SCORE owner Roger Norman when they were the overall 4-wheel and SCORE Trophy Truck champions and the pair was second in 2009. In 2010, Roger Norman drove solo the length of the peninsula and finished third overall. Special history was also made in 2010 when the father/son team of Gustavo Vildosola Sr and Gustavo ‘Tavo’ Vildosola Jr, of Mexicali, drove to the overall 4-wheel and SCORE Trophy Truck victory to become the first Mexican nationals’ team to win the legendary race and it was a peninsula run from Ensenada to La Paz.

SAME SIREN Lured by the same siren that enraptured the Ekins brothers in the 1950s, the SCORE Baja 1000 remains as the No. 1 target of adventurers the world over, not to mention the cadre of pro and semi-pro desert racers who consider it the fitting climax to their racing season each year.

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Photo Credit: getsomephoto.com

THIS YEAR-SPLIT-START Commemorating the first race, motorcycle and quad classes will start at midnight (PT) on Wednesday, Nov. 15 and the car, truck and UTV classes will begin their journey in the elapsed-time race 10 hours later at 10 a.m. (PT) on Thursday, Nov. 16. While the fastest vehicles are expected to complete the course in approximately 20 hours, all vehicles will have 48 hours from the time each starts to complete the course and become an official finisher of the 50th anniversary race.

THE WHO The royalty of desert racing will be in this year’s field and leading the way will once again be the marquee SCORE Trophy Trucks, the SCORE-created class for high-tech, 900-horsepower unlimited production trucks. There are already 37 SCORE Trophy Trucks entered in this year’s celebratory race. Among the entries in SCORE Trophy Truck are No. 11 Rob MacCachren/Jason Voss, No. 1 Carlos ‘Apdaly’ Lopez/Juan C. Lopez, No. 77 Robby Gordon, No. 31 Andy McMillin/Tavo Vildosola, No. 97 B.J. Baldwin/Rodimiro Amaya, No. 15 Billy Wilson/Chad Bunch, No. 4 Justin Matney/Josh Daniel, No. 23 Dan McMillin/Gary Weyhrich, No. 19 Tim Herbst/P.J. Jones, No. 7 Bryce Menzies, No. 83 Luke McMillin/Larry Roeseler, No. 91 Troy Herbst/Brett Sourapas, No. 3 Mark Post/Ed Herbst/Kyle LeDuc, No. 9 Armin Schwarz/Eduardo Laguna, No. 16 Cameron Steele/Cody Stuart/Pat Dean/Rene Brugger, No. 14 Cameron Steele/Cody Stuart/Pat Dean/Rene Brugger, No. 41 Justin Lofton/Matt Loiodice, No. 76 Jesse Jones/Austin Jones/Toby Price, No. 21 Pat O’Keefe/Mark McMillin, No. 5L Clyde Stacy/Jeff Geiser (SCORE TT Legend class) and No. 21L Gus Vildosola Sr/Rodrigo Ampudia Sr/Scott Bailey (SCORE TT Legend).

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Photo Credit: getsomephoto.com

THE WHERE To date, there are 206 total entries from 34 U.S. States, two U.S. Territories and 19 countries officially signed up to compete. In addition to the United States, the U.S. Territories of Guam and Puerto Rico and the host country Mexico, the other countries with racers entered are Australia, Austria, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, England, Finland, France, Germany, India, Israel, Italy, Japan, New Zealand, Peru, South Africa and Spain.

WHO ELSE BUT SAL! Sal Fish, 78, the iconic desert racing promoter who owned SCORE International for 38 years, will be the Grand Marshal for November’s 50th BFGoodrich Tires SCORE Baja 1000. Off-Road Motorsports Hall of Famer Fish, who lives in Malibu, Calif., has earned more awards in his life than most racers have won races and was the face of SCORE from 1974 until he sold the company to Roger and Elise Norman on Dec. 20, 2012. A graduate from the University of San Francisco, Fish had risen to the top as the Publisher of Hot Rod Magazine when Mickey Thompson, who founded SCORE in 1973, recruited Fish to be the President of SCORE.

DUST 2 GLORY From award-winning documentary filmmaker Brown, ‘Dust 2 Glory,’ scheduled to premiere nationwide on Dec. 6, chronicled each of the four races in the 2016 SCORE World Desert Championship. Brown’s original Dusty to Glory, released in 2005, became an iconic classic showcasing the legendary SCORE Baja 1000. D2G, which began shooting at the 2015 SCORE Baja 1000, continued up close and personal coverage capturing the robust racers in their amazing adventures in Mexico’s majestic Baja California peninsula through all four spectacular 2016 races. Executive Producer is BCII’s Bud Brutsman. Tickets for the special, one-night Dec. 6 nationwide premiere will go on sale on Oct. 23. For information regarding tickets and theater locations, visit https://www.fathomevents.com/events/dust-2-glory.

EL REY NETWORK The four-race 2017 SCORE World Desert Championship in Baja California, Mexico along with the SEMA SCORE Baja 1000 Experience/SCORE Baja 1000 Qualifying in Las Vegas are all airing on El Rey Network in the United States. International distribution is by way of syndication. The season-ending 50th SCORE Baja 1000 will have a two-hour show produced while the other race shows are each one-hour telecasts. El Rey Network is available in 45 million homes across the country through cable and OTT providers and via satellite on DirecTV Channel 341 and Dish Network Channel 253. For more information on how to watch El Rey visit http://elreynetwork.com.

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Photo Credit: getsomephoto.com

SCORE SPONSORS… Official SCORE Sponsors: BFGoodrich Tires-Official Tire & Official Race Title Sponsor, Monster Energy-Official Energy Drink, King Shocks-Official Shock Absorber, RACELINE Wheels-Official Wheel, Axial R/C-Official R/C Vehicle, El Rey Network-Official Television Partner, Wide Open Excursions-Official Arrive and Drive Company, Crystal Bay Casino-Official Casino. SCORE Official Partners: PCI Race Radios, 4 Wheel Parts, The Satellite Phone Store, Satellite Del Norte, Instant Mexico Auto Insurance, CETTO Vineyards. Additional SCORE Associate Partners: Proturismo Ensenada, Baja California Secretary of Tourism, Baja California Sur State Government, Baja California Sur Secretary of Tourism, Mexicali Ayuntamiento, COTUCO Mexicali/San Felipe, Cruz Roja Mexicana, Corporate Helicopters, McKenzie’s Performance Products, Advanced Color Graphics. Tijuana SCORE Desert Challenge Special Partners: XXII Ayuntamiento de Tijuana, Baja California Secretary of Tourism, Tijuana Comite de Turismo and Convenciones, Comite de Marcadotecnia Turistica, Asociacion de Hoteles del Noroeste. For more information regarding SCORE, visit the official website of the SCORE World Desert Championship at www.SCOREInternational.com.

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Photo Credit: getsomephoto.com

To see all of the SCORE® Baja 1000 Milestones including: All-Time Finish Sites, Top Total Starters, Top Total Finishers, Top Total Starters and Top Total Finishers; visit: 50th BFGoodrich Tires SCORE Baja 1000

Supercrawl 2017 – Lasernut Racing

Supercrawl 2017 - Lasernut Racing

The Lasernut Racing crew was out at the Supercrawl 2017 event held at Wild West Motorsports Park in Sparks, NV. Our very own Randall Davis, spotter for Lasernut team driver Cody Waggoner, was part of the winning team that took place on September 23-24, 2017.

Not only was this the first event that Cody had a chance to drive the car, it was also the first they had ever SEEN it! The new moon buggy was aptly named Pretty Penny – just check out those stunning copper wheels!

At the end of the comp on day one there was only a 1 point separation between 1st, 2nd, 3rd. Lasernut was sitting in first but knew that one mistake would cost them to lose the position. The Lasernut crew had a near perfect final day, making a flawless run on the final course to seal the championship!!

Links
https://www.facebook.com/Supercrawl2017/
http://supercrawl.rocks/
http://supercrawl.rocks/results/2017-results/

Below are pictures from the event as well as the runs from both days 1 and 2.

Video – Day 1

Video – Day 2

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Proper RC Adventure Hike Prep – GCRad1′s Basic 101: 10 Essentials

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Words: Rodney Wills aka GCRad1

Let’s get down to reality. We are grown adults playing with toy trucks! Yes, I said it out loud. But today, that is besides the point, yet is the cause for this article. We are often times so enthusiastic with our hobby, we tend to neglect “the three basics” along with backpacking’s 10 essentials once we are full-steam into our enthusiastic adventure pursuit of escapism aka scale trailing, RC adventuring hiking…

No mater what you call it, you know you forgot to drink water and bring snacks on that last RC adventure hike! Nothing wrong with that, but these three basics are the things that matter most in life! Food – Water – Shelter.

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• One can not go without water for roughly 7-days
• One can not go without food for roughly 21-days
• One can not survive hypothermia for extended periods

Water, food and shelter are provided to us from day one, until we learn how to provide for ourselves. These are the simple truths of life.
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I hear watchyasayin, “Come on! I don’t want to read all this philosophical Rad1 rhyming rhetoric! Get on with it!”

But back to our pursuit of play. No matter if you are hiking, camping, off-roading or mountain biking, food-water-shelter are the three raw basic essentials across the board. The root of the Axial brand is the SCX10, THE adventure rig! Thus hiking with your SCX10 can take you into a world of adventure beyond the backyard boundaries. Your rig is adventure ready right out of the box as seen in our 2012 trek Across Rubicon, but are you?

You know I love adventures of all sorts and some of you may know I’ve been very passionate about bicycling as well. While I like all the hard parts techno-babble lust, it’s the physical engine on the bike that makes a grandpa on his ’80′s 20-lbs steel frame bike smoke a dude on his 14-lbs all carbon bike! It’s been my interest in cycling that has built my passion for attempting to be more physically fit so I can take on all these adventures. But simply walking into a bike shop and asking questions on physical performance will NOT get you what you want, rather what they want to sell you. What you need is information first and I have spent a many nights doing my research and Hammer Nutrition has given me some serious education over all the other brands. Lets start at the beginning.

WATER
The single most important element, water. Yea, sure… we’ve all gone without it for a few hours on a hike or ride, but how did you feel afterwards? How did you feel the next day? Often times, doing the right thing now for your body doesn’t give you instant results, but the effects of properly hydrating means you will be better suited for tomorrow. And as I age, I only find it more important! Here you thought it was just your job on Monday that made you feel like crap… OK, maybe the margarita too. Back to education.

I like the fact that Hammer Nutrition will tell you that you do not have to buy their products, others will work, but they are winning my dollars with their education!
Let’s start with, “Keep fluid intake during exercise between 16-28 ounces per hour.IMG_9703
You ever notice the 24oz symbol on your AXIALFEST water bottles? There for a
reason! Here is some more great education from Hammer Nutrition.
Hydration – What You Need to Know & How your cooling system works hit that link and make sure you read down to the “ELECTROLYTE REPLENISHMENT – Why it’s so important and how to do it right” link too. That’s a lot of information just about water!

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As you can see, HYDRATION is the first on their Essential Knowledge list and Hammer Nutrition does NOT sell you any sort of super advanced coal mined calcine denatured bio-lab fortified pasteurized WATER!

ZERO TO FULL PUNCH IN 2.2 SECONDS
Now, while a lot of Hammer’s info is geared towards endurance athletes (all you ULTRA 5K ENDURO guys should be reading every ounce), everything is a sliding scale that you will tailor to your physical needs. My rule of thumb, if this is what gets you to peak performance levels, I can scale down to my personal needs.

We all start at zero with the outer limit being the unknown. Getting a grasp on the outer limit now gives us a “window” or sliding scale to work from to suit or test our needs. You can’t go from zero to “FULL PUNCH” in 2.2-seconds and not expect consequences. You have to build up.It’s baby-steps, building blocks built on time, thus patience is involved in building endurance to tap out miles on a bike or a hike.

Another good story on water: https://www.thehikinglife.com/health-safety/hydration/

FOOD
You may have heard me refer to my Scooby Snacks and ScottG calls it my “cardboard bars” but when we are on our go-missions, I like to travel light and physically fuel as simple and efficiently as I can. Again, through cycling I’ve learned about proper nutrition for physical activities.
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Photo courtesy of Rob Stinnett on Flickr.com
Yes, I started with the original, the PowerBar somewhere around 1988 when I moved down to southern California and started mountain biking. I’ve tried them all! I technically don’t have a hands down favorite… it’s like saying I only eat hamburgers. I like variety and switch around with both brands and flavors. But the most important part of all is getting good calories into your system vs “sugar-crash” calories from candy bars.

SHELTER
We come into this world naked, thus clothing starts as a basic of shelter within a shelter of our homes of which our parents all provide for us. No, I’m not going to show any baby-nakee photos! But, our parents dress us, we revolt, we make bad decisions, our parents tell us to “bring a jacket!” then that one day, they don’t tell us… we learn through tough tactile relationship with mother earth no matter how many times our parents TOLD us to “bring a jacket!” (bonus reading)
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PACKING THE TEN ESSENTIALS

Whenever you step into the back country, even on day hikes, is a good habit to have the essentials. True, on a routine trip you may use only a few of them. Yet you’ll probably never fully appreciate the value of the Ten Essentials until you really need one of them. That’s the whole idea behind being prepared! It’s almost like preventative maintenance, having the tools to fix yourself. It’s the 5.11 Tactical motto “ALWAYS BE READY.”

The original Ten Essentials list was assembled in the 1930s by The Mountaineers, a Seattle-based organization for climbers and outdoor adventurers, to help people be prepared for emergency situations in the outdoors. In 2003, the group updated the list to a “systems” approach rather than listing individual items (for example, map and compass now fall into the Navigation “system”.)

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The updated “systems” approach made its debut in The Mountaineers’ seminal text on climbing and outdoor exploration, Mountaineering: The Freedom of the Hills (The Mountaineers Books), now in its ninth edition! See the book here: http://www.mountaineersbooks.org/Mountaineering-Freedom-of-the-Hills-9th-Edition-Softcover-P1882.aspx

Since we are all just learning this together, lets start with the original list:

THE 10 HIKING ESSENTIALS

1. Appropriate footwear. For a short day hike that doesn’t involve a heavy pack or technical terrain, trail shoes are great. For longer hikes, carrying heavier loads, or more technical terrain, hiking boots offer more support.

2. Map and compass/GPS. A map and compass not only tell you where you are and how far you have to go, it can help you find campsites, water, and an emergency exit route in case of an accident. While GPS units are very useful, always carry a map and compass as a backup.

3. Extra water and a way to purify it. Without enough water, your body’s muscles and organs simply can’t perform as well. Consuming too little water will not only make you thirsty, but susceptible to hypothermia and altitude sickness.

4. Extra food. Any number of things could keep you out longer than expected: getting lost, enjoying time by a stream, an injury, or difficult terrain. Extra food will help keep up energy and morale.

5. Rain gear and extra clothing. Because the weatherman is not always right. Dressing in layers allows you to adjust to changing weather and activity levels. Two rules: avoid cotton (it keeps moisture close to your skin) and always carry a hat.

6. Safety items: fire, light, and a whistle. The warmth of a fire and a hot drink can help prevent hypothermia. Fires are also a great way to signal for help if you get lost. If lost, you’ll also want the whistle as it is more effective than using your voice to call for help (use 3 short bursts). And just in case you’re out later than planned, a flashlight/headlamp is a must-­have item to see your map and where you’re walking.

7. First aid kit. Prepackaged first­aid kits for hikers are available at any outfitter. Double your effectiveness with knowledge: take a first­aid class with the American Red Cross or a Wilderness First Aid class.

8. Knife or multi­purpose tool. These enable you to cut strips of cloth into bandages, remove splinters, fix broken eyeglasses, and perform a whole host of repairs on malfunctioning gear.

9. Sun screen and sun glasses. Especially above treeline when there is a skin­scorching combination of sun and snow, you’ll need sunglasses to prevent snow blindness and sunscreen to prevent sunburn.

10. Daypack/backpack. You’ll want something you can carry comfortably and has the features designed to keep you hiking smartly. Don’t forget the rain cover; some packs come with one built­in.

The 2003 Updated Ten Essential “Systems” from The Mountaineers

Navigation (map and compass)
Sun protection (sunglasses and sunscreen)
Insulation (extra clothing)
Illumination (headlamp/flashlight)
First-aid supplies
Fire (waterproof matches/lighter/candles)
Repair kit and tools
Nutrition (extra food)
Hydration (extra water)
Emergency shelter

In 2003, the essential list was revised as part of the 7th-edition of “M​ountaineering: “The  Freedom of the Hills”​ to keep up with modern equipment. The 8th-edition​ continues with the new essentials list with no major revisions. The list takes a “systems approach” giving more definition to each subject or function.

Hydration:Add extra 2 liters of water for one additional day (for emergency).

Nutrition: Add extra food for one additional day (for emergency). Dry food is preferred to save weight and usually needs water.

Navigation: Topographic map and assorted maps in waterproof container plus a magnetic compass, optional altimeter or GPS receiver.

Sun protection: Sunglasses, sunscreen for lips and skin, hat, clothing for sun protection.

Insulation:​ Hat, gloves, jacket, extra clothing for coldest possible weather during current season.

Illumination: Headlamp, flashlight, batteries. LED bulb is preferred to extend battery life.

First­ Aid: supplies,​ plus insect repellent.

Fire: ​Butane lighter, matches in waterproof container.

Repair kit and tools: Knives, m​ulti-­tool,​ scissors, pliers, screwdriver, trowel/shovel, duct tape, cable ties.

Emergency shelter: ​Tarp, b​ivouac sack,​ s​pace blanket,​ plastic tube tent, jumbo trash bags, insulated sleeping pad.  ­­­­­­­­

OK, so there you have it, the first installment of the GCRad1′s Basic 101!
Stay young, play hard and get your RC Adventure Hike on!
Always in search of adventure one rock at a time! – Rodney Wills.
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How do you Camp? – Living Arrangements At Axialfest

There is nothing like the true outdoors experience of Axialfest where not only do you become one with your RC machine while trekking across some amazing landscape, but you take advantage of an amazing camping experience at the beautiful campgrounds at Cisco Grove. During the week long event, you’ll pass by a variety of living arrangements and if you’ve never been to Axialfest, but have it on your list of to do’s we want you to be prepared.

THE LODGE Living Arrangements At Axialfest

Although the Lodge has a few rooms, they are typically reserved and you really need to think about what style of camping suits you. The Lodge however does have a small market with essential supplies like beverages, food and things you may need on your campsite. Firewood is available too, and necessary for those times spent talking with friends about the day’s trail adventures.

THE CLASSIC TENT Living Arrangements At Axialfest Living Arrangements At Axialfest

There is no shortage of tent sightings at Axialfest, this is the easiest, most compact way to get maximum gear into your 1:1 vehicle and still stow some living quarters in there as you make your journey to Axialfest. Beyond the tent, remember a tarp to place under the tent, sleeping bags, lights and some towel when using the campgrounds bathroom facilities to get your day going.

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POP UP’S Living Arrangements At Axialfest

These are like an extension of camping homes across the park. Many attendees bring pop-up tents as well to cover things like their picnic tables or even their work tables where they wrench on their RC rigs. Which is more important to cover? Food or RC stuff? We leave that decision up to you.

THAT THERE IS AN RV Living Arrangements At Axialfest

Motor homes, RV’s, Trailer, whatever you want to call it, there plenty of these camping homes nestled into the campgrounds for the week. Many people bring their own, some rent and there are the borrowers too. There was even a report of Axial’s John Schultz tirelessly setting up a sleeping space for some rogue reporter who wound up sleeping elsewhere, what a dork. But back on topic, Cisco Grove is a campground, a large campground that has been around for years and has all the amenities necessary for camping hook-ups. They even offer dry firewood for your fire pit… Axialfest Camping

FULL TILT Living Arrangements At Axialfest

There are spots where you will see full tilt set-ups, small communities of sorts where friends camp together and multiple spots turn into one. RV’s, tents, pop-ups, tables, BBQ’s, coolers, temporary floors, satellite dishes and we even saw a pool! And why not? What we are showing here is maximum comfort and a vacation-like atmosphere for all who attend.

Living Arrangements At Axialfest Living Arrangements At Axialfest

PREPARE YOUR SPACE Living Arrangements At Axialfest

Remember at Axialfest, you need to be pretty self sufficient. There are some stores nearby, but who wants to travel off of the grounds when there are so many trails to tackle with your trail truck? It’s best to arrive with everything you’ll possible need on hand. Beyond your Axial RC gear, you’ll need food, fluids, sleeping bags, shower items, cloths, supplies for cooking and so on. Please remember to take out what you take in as we all need to do our part to keep the facilities clean for years of Axialfest events to com.

GET STARTED FOR NEXT YEAR

Believe it, or not, after Axialfest 2017 wrapped up or any of the previous Axialfest, the very next day, Axial Staff as well as attendees have already started on preparing for next years event. Making lists of things that need to get done, lists of things to bring and keeping an eye out for open registration and campsite bookings. If you want to camp near your friends, you need to get together with them ahead of time to find and book the right spot. Axialfest has grown quite large and even though Cisco Grove is massive, it is filling up and spaces are starting to become limited. Get ready and get in on the action!

Install a Fuel Cell/Parts Bin into Your Axial SCX10 II

Install a Fuel Cell/Parts Bin into Your Axial SCX10 II

We recently posted a video to Youtube of our favorite tools and parts we bring with us when we hit the trails (see it here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mZxm84NMJr0). With some further brainstorming, we came up with a cool idea that let’s your SCX10 II carry it’s own spare parts! All you need is a Yeti fuel cell fitted between the trucks shock hoops. Here’s how to do it.

TOOLS NEEDED:
1. 2.0mm Hex Wrench

LIST OF PARTS USED:
AXA0113 Axial M3x6mm Hex Socket Button Head Screw
AXA144 Axial M3x8mm Hex Socket Flat Head Screw
AXA1105 Axial Cone Washer
AX31125 Axial Yeti™ Fuel Cell

Let’s get started!

Step 1

Install a Fuel Cell/Parts Bin into Your Axial SCX10 II
Before installing the fuel cell, I attached the top and added a pair of AXA0113 M3x6mm BH screws to the holes I won’t be using. This is not really necessary but does help give the cell a more ‘finished’ look.

TIP: Prior to installation, paint the fuel cell. This will give your rig a more finished look.

Step 2

Install a Fuel Cell/Parts Bin into Your Axial SCX10 II
The first install step is to remove the top shock mount screws. This gives us access to the bracing between the shock mount hoops.

Step 3

Install a Fuel Cell/Parts Bin into Your Axial SCX10 II
Slide the assembled fuel cell in between the shock hoops as shown and line up the holes with the bosses on the cell. Secure with the AZA144 M3x8mm FH screws and AXA1105 Cone Washers. The red arrow points to the mounting location.

Step 4

Install a Fuel Cell/Parts Bin into Your Axial SCX10 II
Boom! That’s it! You can take the lid off, pour your spare parts in there and close it back up. The fuel cell could also be used to house lighting or winch controllers, but be warned that it is not waterproof.

Words and photos by Tony Phalen

 

Lucas Oil Offroad EXPO 2017

Lucas Oil Offroad EXPO 2017

This years Lucas Oil Off-Road Expo was once again held at the world famous Pomona Fairplex in Pomona, CA. In addition to having the greatest collection of off-road companies, parts, equipment, gear, action and experts ever assembled in America, there were also thousands of people cruising through to see some amazing vehicles!

Fans had a chance to experience the dynamic world of off-road thru ride-alongs, racing demos, celebrity appearances, live music, industry media events and product giveaways all weekend long.

As you can see from the photos below, we had a great time checking out all the equipment! We’ll be sure to be there again next year!

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