Fitting 2.2 Ripsaw tires on your SCX10

Ever since we posted the sneak peek video of our new 2.2 Ripsaw tires, we’ve been getting a lot of questions on fitting 2.2 tires onto our SCX10 line of trucks. Bolting the 2.2 tires and wheels up to the truck isn’t all that difficult, but you will have issues with tires rubbing the bumpers and body. A little trim job to the bumpers and body will fix that though, and give your scale truck a little more aggressive look. For this article I am going to use our RTR SCX10 Honcho. I chose the Honcho because it has a little longer wheelbase then the Dingo TR, which will fit the 2.2 tires and wheels better. The Honcho will be the easiest to modify too, because you will only have to modify the front bumper and body.

Here’s how the Honcho looked before I got started:
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Here’s a few side by side pictures of the two tires:
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Here you can see this same Honcho with the 2.2 Ripsaw tires and wheels mounted, before I started cutting:
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Here are a few more photos highlighting the problem areas. Notice the 2.2 tire hitting the body and front bumper way before the suspension bottoms out:
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First thing we are going to do is remove the front bumper and cut it back so the tires clear it as the suspension cycles. Start by removing the center skid plate from the front bumper:
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Now remove the lights from the front bumper, and pull it off your truck:
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After removing the bumper, take the remaining 2 skid plates out of the bumper as well. Here you can see that I will cut along the edge of the bumper in the area highlighted by my hex driver:
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After I cut the wings off I used an X-acto knife to smooth everything out:
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Reinstall the bumper, lights and center skid:
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Here you can see the tires clear the bumper with ease now, even when the suspension cycles:
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Now, with the body on the chassis, we can check to see how much cutting it’ll take to clear the tires:
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Next, I laid the cut line out on the body with a black marker, so it’s easier to visualize the final cut:
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Cut the body a little less then you think you’ll need, and recheck to see if anything is still rubbing:
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Here you can see the tire is still hitting the body just a little:
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This is how it will looks after the final trim is done:
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Now repeat the last few steps for the other side of the body:
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And you’re done and ready for fun!
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Overall stance after being chopped:
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While this Honcho may not look as scale as it used to, the capabilities gained will far outweigh the slight loss in scale appearance.

How to Waterproof your SCX10

Lately there has been a surge in scale truck competitions. The competitions range from mild trail runs with gates, to full on “Top Truck Challenge” style events. No matter which style event you are into, there is probably going to be one common obstacle at most of these scale events…………………water. As most people know water and electric R/C’s don’t really mix well together. Most electronic R/C’s can be very sensitive to moisture, let alone splashing water and/or snow. But, with some care and a little preventive maintenance driving your SCX10 in wet conditions can be done with no consequences to your electronics, or your wallet. This article is geared towards keeping your electronics dry, even if you completely submerse your SCX10 in water. There is something about driving scale R/C trucks in water, mud and snow that is unbelievably fun. I can’t really put my finger on it, but for some reason it is an absolute blast. So, here are a few tips to help keep you splashing around in your local creek, instead of at the work bench replacing ruined electronics.

For this article I will use a stock SCX10 TR Honcho, that has been modified to run 2.2 wheels and tires. Here’s how it looks before I got started.
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Here’s how it looked after I removed the battery tray. Next I took the cover off the receiver box, then peeled the ESC off the box as well.
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I started with the receiver and simple LED kit. First, I used a little double stick tape to attach the LED controller to the side of the receiver. With it configured like this I will still be able to put everything back inside the electronics box after the balloon treatment. Make sure your wires are somewhat organized too, and are all on one side of the receiver. The wires will exit the balloon through the opening.
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Now grab a balloon and stretch the open end up using both hands.
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While holding the balloon open, use your left over fingers to guide the receiver and LED controller into place.
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Here is how it will look after installing the first balloon.
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Now we will move onto the ESC. I marked the power switch on the ESC with a Sharpee, so I know where the “on” position is. We will be inserting the ESC inside another balloon, and access to the power switch may no longer be available. I personally would cut the switch off and solder the positive and negative leads together. So when you plug your battery in the ESC kicks on automatically. But, there are ways around that if you don’t want to solder.
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To avoid soldering the power switch leads, I just used a Ziptie to ensure the ESC remains on at all times. Depending on how it’s set-up, you may be able to access the power switch right through the balloon.
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After prepping the power switch, I used a little double stick tape on it as well, and attached it to the side of the ESC.
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Here you can see the ESC is ready to be installed inside another balloon.
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Stretch the balloon over the ESC just like you did for the receiver.
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Now grab a second set of hands to help with this next step. Have your second set of hands hold the ballooned electronics at the base of the ESC/receiver and at the end of the balloon. While you grab the neck of the balloon in the center, pull up, and wrap it around itself as many times as you can.
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Now use a Ziptie to hold the neck of the balloon in it’s wrapped state.
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Add a couple more Zipties to either side of the first after, just for piece of mind. Also, we will be installing a second balloon over both the ESC and receiver, so try to keep the first set of Zipties that hold the neck of the balloon close to the actual ESC/receiver. Because the second balloon will be installed over the whole assembly, and you will have to wrap the neck of the second balloon just like you did the first.
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Now, as mentioned in the last step, double balloon the ESC and receiver using the same method. It may seem redundant to wrap the electronics in a second balloon. But, I will gladly spend the extra few minutes and .5 cents it takes to ensure my electronics are 100% safe from moisture. Please keep in mind that you will want to monitor your ESC temps for the first few runs to make sure nothing is going to overheat. If you are geared right, temps shouldn’t be a problem at all. But, if your ESC gets hot under normal driving conditions, you may want to install a smaller pinion on the motor to help eliminate heat.

You can see the receiver fits nicely back into the stock location , after I installed the second balloon.
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Here you can see everything is back together just like the stock set-up. I used double stick tape to re-attach the ESC to the radio box, then added a Ziptie around them both, just to make sure the ESC doesn’t go anywhere.
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Now it’s time to prep the steering servo. Remove the servo horn, then remove the servo from the axle.
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Now remove the 4 screws from the bottom of the servo.
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Remove the top and bottom caps.
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For this step we will use some dielectric grease to stop water from entering the servo through the hole in the top cap.
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Add some of the dielectric grease around the servo’s splined output shaft, on top of the bushing/bearing.
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I also added a little more dielectric grease to the gears just to re-lube them.
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Then reassemble the servo, you should see the grease starting to push out around the servo’s output shaft. Now reinstall the servo on the front axle.
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For an extra measure of protection you can dip the whole servo in Plasti-Dip. It’s a liquid rubber compound that will coat the outside of the servo, and help stop water from penetrating the working internals. While no one here at the Axial headquarters has used this method, or can endorse the use of this product. There are video tutorials on YouTube that show the proper method for using the Plasti-Dip. Also keep in mind if you plan on submersing your SCX10 in water deeper then the center of your headlights, you should install a high quality snorkel first.

One last thing we should mention is that running your SCX10 in water will rust anything that is steel on your truck. Bearings, steel gears, axles shafts, etc will all develop rust if exposed to water. Proper maintenance will be required to keep rust down to a minimum.

Brian Parker’s G6 Scale Challenge

Most people in the R/C rock crawling world know Brian Parker and everything he has done for this sport. For those that aren’t familiar with his name, he is an innovator when it comes to R/C crawling. He is always pushing the envelope and trying new things during competitions. I would personally bet money that he has built more 2.2 competition courses then anyone else in the world, with ease. When you show up to an event where Brian built the courses, you know you are going to have the time of your life. He knows how to challenge drivers with situations that make you think.

Brian recently got bitten by the scale bug, and he is 100% hooked!! He has now started a series of events dubbed as the “G6 Challenge.” He is basically combining off-road racing, rally racing, trophy truck challenge, rock crawling and basically any other motor sport that takes place off-road, into one event. There are usually 3 courses set-up per event with anywhere from 50-100 gates…………………per course. That’s right, some events competitors will have to negotiate nearly 300 gates before the day is over. Multiple high capacity batteries, a winch, some tow straps and bulletproof rig are pretty much the minimum requirements. Some runs can take up to an hour per course too. So, you will get your moneys worth when attending any G6 Challenge. Here is a run down of the rules and requirements for entering a G6 Challenge.

Vehicle Requirements:
1. Must be 1/10 scale electric car/truck with a scale chassis. (No 2.2 comp chassis with a scale body) A scale chassis could be a MSD or a RC4WD or an Axial SCX-10 chassis.

2. 1.9 or 1.55 wheels and tires ONLY! Tire may be name brand or knock offs, just as long as they resemble the real thing.

3. Vehicle must have at least 5 scale accessories. (I.e. jerry can, bed roll, cooler, shovel, winch, rock lights, ect.) This requirement may vary from G6 to G6 depending on what the event requires.

4. NO rear steer and NO dig. A vehicle may have 4×4 or 2×4 capabilities.

5. A vehicle must have a tow strap and winch points. (I.e. Bumper, D-rings, ect.)

R.E.C.O.N. G6 Stage Format:
When a driver starts a stage, he/she is competing against the clock. A driver must navigate through the stage gates in the order they are numbered and between the gates, even if winching is required. A time penalty is given for hitting a gate or a boundary. A stage is completed when the driver crosses the finish line.

1. 2 to 4 driving stages with multiple mandatory skills sections in each stage.

2. Finishing order will be determined by the over all accumulative adjusted time of all the driving stages. For teams, all the times of the team drivers will be added together. Team drivers are all eligible for the overall award.

3. Time bonuses are earned by completing the mandatory skills sections cleanly. If a driver has to winch or hits a boundary or a gate marker, a time bonus will not be awarded and the driver still has to finish the bonus stage.

4. Stages can range in distance. Battery changes may be performed as needed on a stage. If a driver has only one battery and cannot complete the stage, the driver must leave the rig at the location on the stage while the battery is being charged. If the rig is removed from the stage then a DNF will be recorded and the max time given to that driver for the stage.

5 Once a stage has been started by the driver; the time will not stop until the driver has crossed the finish line. This includes repairs on course and in the pit. When the last driver to start a stage crosses the finish line, the stage is closed, if a driver is still on the stage when the stage closes, that driver will receive a DNF and given the max time for the stage.

6. No repairs or battery changes can be made during a skills challenge section. On course repairs can be made at the point of breakage and as long as the stage is still open. If a battery has to be replaced during a special section, than a 5 min penalty will be charged to the driver.

7. Drivers will start at specified intervals; if a driver catches up to a fellow driver, the driver that is being passed, must yield to the faster driver immediately. A driver cannot overtake another driver during a special skill section; the faster driver must wait at the start of the skills section until the slower driver exits said section.

8. There is no “Hand of God”. This means all recoveries must be done by using a winch. If the rig is underwater and the driver grabs the rig instead of using the penalty winch, that driver will be charged a 5 minute penalty. The G6 is designed for a driver to be a driver, not a boonie basher. If a driver does not have a winch and has to use the penalty winch; a 3 minute penalty will be charged to that driver.

9. No repairs can be made between stages. After a driver completes a stage, his/her vehicle will be impounded until the start of the next stage. A designated pit area will be provided to do all needed repairs before the next stage while the time is running.

10. The running order will be G6 specific. It may be luck of the draw or running order may be assigned by the last G6 times. Stage Buddy’s will be assigned in a similar manner.

A Stage buddy is a driver’s stage marshal. He or she will be on the stage with the driver marking time penalties or time bonus and if the driver does not have a winch, the stage buddy will use the penalty winch to recover or assist the driver’s vehicle. After the driver completes his stage, then the stage buddy and the driver switch roles. At no time will the stage buddy assist a driver with navigating the stage. A stage buddy is not a co-driver. G6 team drivers will not be a stage buddy for a team member. Team members may or may not be allowed to help navigate a fellow team driver. That will be deemed by the G6 event.

Time Penalties:
1. Hitting a gate marker will result in a 1:00 min time penalty.

2. Hitting any stage boundary will result in a 5 min. penalty.

3. Using the penalty winch will result in a 3 min penalty.

Time Bonuses:
Completing a time bonus section cleanly a driver will receive a 3 minute time bonus. If a driver has to winch, hits the boundary, or has to make a repair or battery change in the section, no time bonus will be awarded and any penalties will be charged.

Time bonus sections will have a specific color boundary and have a stage gate at the beginning and end of the section, but may involve more than two gates.

Stage Gates:
A stage will be marked with gates. The gates are used to define a stage and the color of the gate will define the intended direction of the gate. A gate consists of two flags; on yellow and one red. The red flag is always on the passenger side of the rig, unless other wise noted.

A rig must drive between the stage gates and all 4 tires must be inside the stage gates for progression, even if winching is required to successfully clear the gate. There is no straddling a stage gate to progress.

A stage gate can only be driven in the intended direction! A driver CANNOT drive through a stage gate and then reverse back through it to continue on the stage.

A stage gate may also have special skill instructions attached to them. The driver and the stage buddy are responsible for making sure all special skills are performed for the stage.

Special Skill Sections:
A special skill section will have boundaries and be marked by a specific color.

A special skill section can be a task such as changing a tire and running the section using the spare tire or using a winch to perform a task. A special section can be driving in snow, ice, mud, water, and sand, up hill, down hill or in reverse.

A few highlights from one of the G6 events. Thanks to Rhett Mora for the use of his pictures.
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For more info on any upcoming G6 events check out www.reconcrawlers.com