AXIALFEST 2015 – REGISTRATION NOW OPEN

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RESERVE THE DATE: JULY 17th – 19th, 2015 –  We are going camping!

Official hashtag: #axialfest2015

TO REGISTER, follow the link here: www.axialfest2015.eventzilla.net

The Axial family is excited to announce AXIALFEST 2015 registration is now open! THIS IS AN AXIAL CUSTOMER APPRECIATION FESTIVAL! Bring all your Axial rigs, and leave all others behind as this will truly be an Axial only family based event! This event will bring maximum fun, the biggest smiles, the best prizes any R/C event has seen since our last event, and more! Come Celebrate Axial’s 10-YEAR ANNIVERSARY at this year’s AXIALFEST!!!

ONLY PRE-REGISTERED ATTENDEES RECEIVE THE EVENT T-SHIRT & DRIVER BAG!! ALL ON-SITE REG MUST BE IN CASH!!! T-shirts will be available for purchase on site.

Sign up here: www.axialfest2015.eventzilla.net

If this will be your first time to AXIALFEST and you want to learn more, or see what it was like in previous years check out this blog from 2014: http://www.axialracing.com/blog_posts/1073909506

Or this video recap from 2013:

What is Rock Racing?

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Axial offers vehicles identified as rock crawlers and as rock racers such as the SCX10 and the Yeti, respectively. To make the perfect selection when purchasing your R/C vehicle, you need to know the difference between rock crawling and rock racing.

Rock crawling has been around as long as there have been off-road vehicles like the classic Jeep and rocks to drive them on. The Rubicon Trail in northern California might have originally been used by settlers in covered wagons, but the rocks on that trail have probably seen more rubber tires than wagon wheels. When people think of rock crawling, they often think of this iconic trail or a similar scene and driving over rock formations with beautiful vistas. They see rock crawling as slow, enjoyable and relaxing. They also recognize that it’s challenging. This is recreational rock crawling. It can be a pretty tame trip down an easy trail with a few rocks to negotiate or a hardcore excursion with ample body damage and winching. Recreational rock crawling led to the creation of competitive rock crawling. You probably already know that if it is automotive in nature, it can and will be made into a competition.

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Rock crawling, as the name implies, generally takes place on rocky terrain and is not about going fast, but sometimes the skinny pedal is the only way to get up and over something. Not all rock crawling is competitive, of course, but when it is a competition, time is a factor and, thus, speed is a factor. Hence, you’ll see plenty of throttle used at rock crawling competitions. The course is most often marked with such items such as cones, tape or rope. Hitting markers results in penalties. So, competitive crawling requires a mix of speed and finesse. You won’t win if you finish with the fastest time, but hit every marker on the course and racked up the time penalties. Conversely, you won’t win a rock crawling competition if you miss every marker with a perfectly executed and clean run, but take all day to finish the course. As described previously, rock crawling is also a popular recreational motorsport. In this case, rock crawling is often called trail riding. Again, as long as the first Jeeps were available to the public, this type of rock crawling has existed.

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In the same way that just about anything automotive can be made into a competition, any automotive competition can increase in intensity if given a little time. Thus rock crawling has given us rock racing. Rock racing comes in many forms. The first type of rock racing evolved from rock crawling competitions that focused more on speed and less on the finesse needed to avoid markers and the accompanying penalties. Some rock racing competitions feature side-by-side racing by running two vehicles on the course at once. One of the more popular forms of rock racing came from a challenge made between desert racers and rock crawlers. The challenge became an annual event called the King of the Hammers. This race combined high speed desert racing and grueling rock crawling. Both forms of racing have high attrition rates and require specialized equipment.

Besides the increased speeds, one of the biggest differences between rock crawling and rock racing is that most rock racing has the whole field on course at once. Again, some small course rock racing might feature two vehicles that are running partially separated courses, but Ultra4 style racing such as the King of the Hammers has the whole field racing at once. This creates an interesting element as isn’t always easy to pass a competitor who’s stuck on the rocks you also need to get up and over.

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R/C rock racing is mostly patterned after the growing full-size Ultra4 style of racing. While people are R/C rock racing all around the country and world, one organization has stood out as a leading in developing a race format, rules and in promoting events. That racing body is U4RC. Following is an interview that helps explain what rock racing and U4RC are all about.

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The R/C community is starting to hear more and more about U4RC, but who is behind this still relatively new organization? U4RC is; Jerry Tobin (owner/founder), Brian Jones (owner/co-founder) and Jerry Ellifritz (owner/promoter). Between the three owners of U4RC there is a very solid background in R/C. Jerry Tobin has been in the SoCal R/C crawling scene since 2005. Jerry competed in competitive R/C crawling at a national level for several seasons and was ranked in the top 15 for USRCCA Super class. In 2009, Tobin created the infamous “King of the Compound” R/C endurance rock/desert race which U4RC, as we know it today, was born from. Brian Jones was around when R/C rock crawling was in its infancy and still on the pages of the monster truck forums, which RCCrawler.com stemmed from originally. Brian has been highly involved over the years in many aspects of growth in the crawling segment of R/C, including exhibitions, trade shows and was one of the original owners of RCP Crawlers. Brian too, was a national level ranked competitive crawler. He even attended the first USRCCA Nationals event in Moab, Utah. Jerry Ellifritz has been involved in R/C crawling for about five years, and comes from the scale side of the hobby originally. In those five years, Jerry has immersed himself deeply in R/C crawling including coordinating “G6” scale events, several one-off scale events and, of course, U4RC. Jerry’s involvement with U4 has proven to be invaluable to the advancement of this exciting, new segment of R/C.

Tell us about U4RC? What is its mission? Who is it geared towards? U4RC is an R/C rock racing organization that was launched in 2012. Our mission is to deliver R/C racing with a real, grass roots operating style and feel to it, unlike what is mostly available to the “go fast” R/C community. Currently the majority of the racers are from the R/C crawling world, although we are surprised constantly by the influx of inquiries and new racers from the “go fast” community. We feel U4RC is a great “crossover” of several genres, mainly because “racers” as well as “scalers” can find common ground within the classes available through U4RC. The class structure is set up so that everyone from a “newbie” with a box stock RTR rig, (SCX10, Spawn, Yeti, Wraith) all the way to advanced custom tuber chassis “builders/racers” have a competitive, fun class to run in.

How many tracks are affiliated with U4RC and what are they typically like? The list of tracks is growing quickly throughout the nation and globally, with tracks in SoCal, NorCal, Washington, Arizona, Florida, Minnesota and so forth. There are currently at least a dozen dedicated U4RC tracks at R/C facilities nationally. There are also U4RC tracks and clubs globally, including Canada, Australia, Austria, South America, Italy, Poland and so on (too many places to list).

Given that U4RC is modeled after full-size rock racing, tracks are typically a design that is different from what is considered the “norm” in R/C off-road racing. U4 tracks are not generally groomed (with the exception of watering), there is no sticky stuff, and you will never see a broom used on a U4 track. In contrast, our tracks usually include one or two rock gardens, a hill climb obstacle, elevation changes, jumps, whoops, wide open straights, stutter jumps, semi-tight technical sections, moguls, sand/gravel pits, etc.

What is the U4RC race format? U4RC runs a heads up heat, LCQ (Last Chance Qualifier), Main style racing format, where top finishing positions are key in every “Heat” round for advancement to the “Main” races. We feel this format is the purest way to find the best of the best for the day. Many forms of R/C racing run a “quickest time” advancement structure during lower rounds. Not at U4RC, we want to avoid drivers having an opportunity to sandbag early in the day by just getting a good “hot lap” time in and not conserving the rig because the track itself is a challenge along with the fellow racers you’re up against.

U4RC, like the full-size competition it models, combines go-fast racing and extreme rock crawling. Who usually does better, the racer types or the rock crawlers? That is a difficult question to accurately answer due to the varying terrains on the different U4RC tracks. The racer types definitely excel on the faster, less technical tracks where high speed vehicle control is key. The crawlers that learn to “go fast” well tend to be very successful due to the fact that you have to conserve your rig to a certain extent during the course of a U4 race. Overall the fastest racers to date in U4RC are the rock crawling crowd, which is very similar scenario when compared to our full size counterparts. Once the racer types learn to conserve their rigs, look out!

What classes are there in U4RC? Describe how the Axial Yeti, Wraith and SCX10 typically fit in the various classes? There are six classes in U4RC racing currently. There is a class available for every Axial rig made at this point. The classes are 1.9 Trail, 1.9 Comp, 1.9 Trophy, 2.2 Comp (Limited), 2.2 Comp (Open) and 2.2 Trophy. The SCX10 platform falls into the 1.9 Trail class, which is intended for trail rigs such as (but not limited to) a “G6” or “1.9 Deadbolt” or “Falken” SCX10. For Wraith owners, there is 2.2 Comp (limited), which is limited to a Solid/Solid axle configuration. The Wraith “Spawn” rock racer is a great starting point for this class. All Wraith models are legal for this class in their stock configuration. Axial Yeti owners have a place to race in 2.2 Comp (Open), which is open to the IFS/Solid axle configuration of the Yeti. The Yetis have proven to totally dominate 2.2 Comp Open since its release last year. Not to be forgotten is the fact that the majority of the 1.9 and 2.2 Trophy class rigs are either built using the SCX10 (1.9) and Wraiths (2.2) as their base for the builds.

 Is there a class for the Axial Yeti XL? We are currently writing rules for the next series that will include a class for the Axial Yeti XL. The XL hit the market just after the current rules were released last year. Given the success and performance of the RTR version and the recently released kit version, we definitely will provide a place for XL Yeti owners to compete. U4RC track in the future will be designed with consideration of the Yeti XL.

What goes into a good U4RC vehicle? Probably the most important thing would be choosing the right components. U4RC racing is hard on parts so choosing the right upgrades for your application is a must.  In an entry-level class where your car is close to stock, the smart thing would be to upgrade the smaller parts before, say, throwing a 3S pack and a 4000+ Kv motor in it. Those things are more suited for the fully built rigs of the mod and trophy classes.  Another very important aspect of setting up a car is suspension.  Good shocks, springs and the right oil combo makes a huge difference.  Since we race at different tracks, with varying technical levels and obstacles, that means the driver needs to be on top of their set-up at all times. Of course, as in all racing, tires are also a big deal. Some drivers actually sipe their own tires for different tracks, just as in the 1:1 world.  Fortunately, we have recently had companies designing not only tires, but many other parts specifically for U4RC racing and the results have been outstanding. If you take a look at our sponsor list you will see what I mean.

There’s an old saying in racing that to finish first you must first finish. That seems to have been suited for Ultra4 racing. Do you have any driving advice you can share for U4RC racers? You nailed it 100% with that statement. That old adage couldn’t apply any more that to U4RC racing. A conservative driving style will get your rig to the finish line, because you are racing against other drivers as well as the challenging terrain. The racers that have a “wide open” driving style generally run a higher risk of catastrophic equipment failures. This is due to the nature of U4 racing and the built-in obstacles throughout the track. Don’t expect the “turn marshal” to win the race for you. Keeping the rubber side down is the way to go. Walk the track prior to your race and identify any obstacles that you will want to avoid or gather your game plan for tackling those obstacles. Final bit of advice is to drive. Get out, drive your rig and learn how it reacts to your inputs from the transmitter.

What do you see in the future for U4RC? We believe that U4RC will bridge the gap between the R/C rock crawling community and the R/C racer community. With the amount of scale realism required from the rules and the extremely fast paced action on the track, it has aspects that both sides will be drawn to. U4RC is holding our first regional level event here on the West Coast this June that is sure to see attendance of U4 racers from all our neighboring states. There has also been overwhelming support and interest from many of the top manufactures in the R/C world, which leads us to believe our future looks bright.

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Photos courtesy of U4RC

A First Timer’s Guide to AXIALFEST

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A First Timer’s Guide to AXIALFEST

Words and Photos by Matt Soileau

Are you planning on attending AXIALFEST? Is this your first time? Then this blog may be just what you have been looking for. This is Skeeno’s Guide to AXIALFEST. I will be covering all that you need to know about having a successful AXIALFEST experience.

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Let’s start with what AXIALFEST is. AXIALFEST is a customer appreciation event held by Axial Racing to thank it’s loyal customers for their support. Each year is a bit different. This year, there will be several driving events including the world famous RECON G6 as well as the RECON Terra-Cross (RTX), and drag races. There is a grand awards ceremony on the final evening with so much giveaway swag it will make your head spin.

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Last year I witnessed what seemed like every single participant received a prize. Many lucky participants scored brand new kits and RTRs. Some lucky drivers also scored a sneak peak of the Axial Yeti prototype before anyone else in the world got to see it! You definitely want to make sure you attend the awards ceremony.

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At AXIALFEST you will witness a celebration of all things Axial. AXIALFEST is the Woodstock of Scale RC, a family gathering of Axial enthusiasts. Hundreds of participants from all over the world come together to share their love of Axial and scale adventure. Expect to see both male and female drivers from all walks of life. From singles to large extended families.

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Not all are drivers; many are just there to support friends and family and watch the fun. There will be groups of people hanging out, wrenching on their Axial kits, cooking, and just generally socializing. Expect to find a very family friendly atmosphere where everyone is willing and eager to help out.

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Step 1: Register

This year there is only one price for everything at AXIALFEST. $54 for each adult and $24 for each child. All preregistered drivers will receive a driver’s bag containing a limited edition AXIALFEST 2015 t-shirt and trucker cap, stickers, itinerary, and swag from Axial and the AXIALFEST sponsors. Word on the street is the swag will be extra special this year, so make sure you preregister now if you haven’t already.

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You can register online right now at:  http://axialfest2015.eventzilla.net

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You may also register in person at AXIALFEST, but will not receive the driver’s bag. Extra shirts will be available for purchase at G-Central, but the driver’s bags are limited to only those who preregister. It is highly recommend that you preregister, so you don’t miss out on any of the limited edition swag from Axial and the official sponsors of AXIALFEST.

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Step 2: Get a place to stay

Luckily, AXIALFEST is at a campground, a huge campground. Don’t be scared if you’ve heard all the camp sites are gone. They are not, but you may have to walk a little farther to get to G-Central as the veterans have probably already reserved their camp spots from last year that are closest to G-Central. Call Cisco Grove to reserve your spot ASAP.

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Cisco Grove Campground

48415 Hampshire Rocks Rd., Cisco Grove, CA 95728

P: 530.426.1600

Cisco Grove is about an hour from Reno, NV and about an hour and a half from Sacramento, CA. Camp sites are about $30 per night and include water and electrical hookups. There are bathroom and showers available at the campground. Multiple people can share the spots to help divide the cost among several people.

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Step 3: Start Packing RC Stuff

• Your kits (SCX10, Wraith, AX10, Exo, Yeti). Since this is AXIALFEST, the thing to remember is to pack Axial vehicles. You can leave your other RCs at home, as this is an Axial appreciation event. Before you arrive at AXIALFEST, make sure you do a once over on your kits. Clean, rebuild, and replace worn components to reduce chances of failure.

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Don’t let something little stop you from finishing. I found this broken axle housing while cleaning up Skeeno Jr’s Axialfest rig just yesterday.

Also, be prepared for mud and water. Chances are high that you will be driving through both, so waterproofing your electronics is not mandatory, but highly recommended.

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For more info on waterproofing, check out these past Axial blogs:

Waterproof Your Receiver

How to Waterproof your SCX10

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• Transmitter, charger, and all of your batteries. You will be driving your kits probably more than you ever have, so you want to make sure you have enough mah to complete each G6 stage. A good rule of thumb is 10,000 mah, but more is always better. You will be able to charge your batteries at your camp sites with the available electricity at each camp site. Make sure to bring a power strip, so you can have multiple chargers going at once.

• Spare Parts. Bring all the spare parts and electronics you have. Driving for three hours straight can tax even the most stoutly built drivetrains. If you don’t have many spare parts, that’s OK. Most veterans will have something to help you out on the trail. Vendors will also be selling parts on site, so bring some spare cash.

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• Tools. Chances that you will need to make a repair or adjustment are high. Bring all your tools, including wrenches, pliers, drivers, scissors, and soldering irons.

• Hydration pack/Camelbak. It will be July and most likely very warm. You will be walking long distances for many hours. Bring a backpack or pack hydration to carry water, trail snacks, and tools and spare parts. There is no shame in stopping on the trail to rest, eat, or fix your kit because the goal is to finish. For more info on what to bring out on the trail, check this blog: Make Your Own RC Vehicle Field Tool Pack

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Camping Equipment

• Lots of people bring RVs and campers. Others rough it in tents. Some people sleep in their cars. A good night sleep makes for a happy AXIALFESTer. Bring the stuff that will get you the best sleep. Tent, Mattress, Sleeping bag, pillow, and extra blankets are highly recommended.

• Canopy/EzUp. It’s nice to have protection from the sun or rain while cooking or wrenching. If you have walls for your canopy, bring those as well.

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• Power strip/splitter. As mentioned earlier, each camp site has water and power. Make sure you have enough outlets for all your chargers, soldering irons, lights, etc. Some sights have the RV outlets, not the standard 110 outlets you see at your house. Have no fear, the camp store has adapters for sale for cheap. I think I paid $5 last year.

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• Lighting/Lantern. You want to be able to see at camp if you have to have a late night wrenching session.

• Alarm clock. Events start early in the morning. You don’t want to be late or miss anything, so bring an alarm that will wake you up, especially if you are a night owl participating in after event revelries.

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• Flashlight and Headlamp. There will be a night stage for the G6. You will need to be able to see in the dark. Don’t skimp. Get a headlamp with a high lumen output.

• Shampoo/soap/quarters. Showers are available, if you can find time, so you don’t get too ripe.

• Sunscreen. Don’t get burned by the high elevation.

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Food and Beverages

• Water/beverages. A hydrated G6er is a happy G6er.

• Meals. Hungry equals grumpy. Be prepared for the breakfasts, lunches, and dinners for each day you will be there. There are no restaurants close by and the camp store has a very limited selection of edibles. That’s 3 breakfasts, 3 lunches, and 3 dinners, if you are planning on being there from Thursday until Sunday. Plan accordingly.

• Snacks. Trail mix and power bars are good to have in case you need extra nutrition in between meals while out on a G6.

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• Stove/BBQ. You gotta cook that food on something, right?

• Regular kitchen supplies. Pots/pans/knives/forks/spoons. Think about what you need for each meal and make sure you bring it.

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• Coffee maker and coffee cups. A nice cup of coffee gets me ready for each long day. I like mine with a little cream and sugar.

• Paper towels. For your meals and wrenching.

• Soap/sponge/towel/buckets. Good for washing your face, brushing teeth, and doing dishes.

• Toothbrush/toothpaste. Fresh breath makes socializing less awkward, especially after a few cups of coffee. No one likes morning breath.

• Ibuprofen/Aspirin/Advil. Bring the pain reliever of your choice. Your feet and legs will be sore if you are not used to extended hours of being on your feet. 1000 trail markers can equal several miles hiking around the campground.

Clothing

• Shoes- bring sturdy shoes for mountain hiking. Hiking boots are recommended. It’s also a good idea to bring some spare shoes for relaxing at camp and flip flops for the showers. I’d also plan on extra socks. After 1000 trail markers and several miles, your feet will most likely be sore.

• Jackets/sweatshirts/pants/hoodie/beanie. You never can tell what Sierra weather will be like. Temps can vary from in the 90s during the day to in the 30s at night. One year it rained. Last year the nights were very cold. Be prepared for everything, so don’t just bring shorts and t-shirts. Pack for four days of clothing, plus extra socks and underwear.

• Swimming gear. There is a little swimming hole at the campground. My daughter makes sure we hit it every year.

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Step 4: Arrive

The first stop is at the camp store at the front of the campground. Pick up your campsite and vehicle tags, then go find your campsite. Get set up, so you can start the fun.

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After you have camp set up, go find G-Central. G-Central is the central hub of Axialfest where all the activities begin. G-Central is located in the pavilion. There will be signs posted to point you in the proper direction. It is easily spotted, because you will see lots of large green Axial banners as well as the RECON G6 canopy, truck and trailer. There are usually other vendor booths also set up at G-Central. If you are not sure, ask someone. Everyone is friendly and helpful.

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At G-Central you will pick up your t-shirts, hats, driver’s bag, and any other instructions. Inside your driver’s bag you will find the Axialfest itinerary, sponsor information, stickers, and some special swag from Axial as well as the official Axialfest sponsors. Make sure you preregister, so you qualify for all the driver bag goodies.

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Don’t forget to check out the camp sites. Assorted vendors will also have their booths set up with their wares displayed and items for sale.

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Trail markers will be everywhere! Don’t be surprised to see trail markers on the side of the road, next to your camp, in G-Central, pretty much everywhere. There are over 1,000 trail markers for the G6, so please do not disturb them. They will be needed for the entire event. Do not be tempted to take the one with your favorite number and risk the next G6er getting lost. Also, feel free to play with your kits, but please stay off marked obstacles. You’ll know because there will be colorful ribbon on certain sections.

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What class are you in? RECON G6. Most AXIALFESTers come for the RECON G6. The RECON G6 is a scale trail run. At Axialfest, the RECON G6 is an extreme trail run. A course of 1,000 trail markers is set. Drivers start from G-Central and follow all 1,000 trail markers out, around, and through the Cisco Grove Campground, ultimately returning back to G-Central to finish. The general rule of the RECON G6 is No HOG, which means No Hand of God. That means you should not touch your rig. No flipping over or repositioning it if stuck. Use a tow strap or winch to make a scale recovery. Also remember to travel in the proper direction. The red trail marker is always on the right. Red on Right, get it?

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Out on the RECON G6 trail, drivers will encounter a varied selection of terrain from dirt to rocks to mud to water to trees to whatever is out there. Have fun using your scale accessories like tow straps, winches and sand ramps to conquer the terrain. And here’s a little secret, if you see something that looks out of the ordinary on the trail, it might be a trail treasure. Attach it to your rig and drive it back to G-Central for a possible bonus.

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Drivers have the freedom to drive as fast or slow as they feel. Most drive in small groups assisting each other when the trail gets difficult. Drivers during a RECON G6 are always happy to help out other drivers by loaning a strap, winch line, parts, or tools. Whatever it takes to help their fellow G6ers continue on the adventure. At Axialfest, the RECON G6 trail is often many miles long, that’s why being prepared is so important. Drivers and their kits need to be prepared to endure a long day of scale fun. And remember, Finishing a RECON G6 is like Winning a RECON G6.

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There are several RECON G6 classes to choose from. Here’s a break down:

Every G6er falls into one of these four classes. 1.9 and 2.2 denote size of your rigs wheels, not tires.

• 1.9 and 2.2 Adventurist- this is the largest class. It’s very relaxed and about having a good time with friends. If you are a first timer, this is probably your class.

• 1.9 and 2.2 Ultra- this is a competitive class. It’s a race. These drivers run. Also known as Cardio RC. Bring your trail running shoes if you choose this class. This class also has more than the standard 1000 trail markers. If you encounter them of the trail it is courteous to pull over and let them pass.
Bonus classes. You will be in the both the above and below classes if you fit into one of the categories below.

• Drivin’ Divas. The lovely ladies of AXIALFEST.

• RECON Rascals. If you are under the age of 16, aka 15 and under.

• 40 and Over Veterans. Old guys rule! Feel free to take your time. We need it.

Other events include the following:

TERRA-X ROCK RACE aka RTX. Rock Racing meets RECON G6! We test the limits of the machine and sometimes the man? Don’t expect a regular timed race. RTX runs on completed laps. Also, don’t plan on a driver’s stand. There’s a little cardio involved here as well. You may be jockeying for position both on the track and in the drivers’ area. You may also be marshalling your own vehicle. RTX has the following classes:
Terra-X Rock Race – 1.9-SCX10 Class
Terra-X Rock Race – Wraith Class
Terra-X Rock Race – YETI Class
Terra-X Rock Race – EXOTerra Buggy
Terra-X Rock Race – OPEN, run what you brung. AKA the Mike Pham class.

1.9 4X4 RHYTHMDRAGS (YES – DRAG RACING IN THE DIRT!)
Yes, we are always trying something new… but it’s not new!

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Trailer queens that spit shine and show it off, minus the cobwebs please!
Once you are settled in, get ready to have a great time. Don’t expect much downtime. Once the action begins, it’s likely that you will be busy the entire weekend. Axialfest 2015 has set a tentative schedule below. Remember, times are subject to change, so be sure to check at G-Central for updates and LISTEN during the driver’s meetings.

Thursday Night July 16th, 2015:
6:00pm – 9:00pm Early Driver Check-In
6:00pm – 9:00pm Concourse Park Ferme
8:00pm – 9:00pm Judging of Concourse

Friday July 17th, 2015: TIMES SUBJECT TO CHANGE!!!
07:30am – 09:30am Driver Check-In
10:00am – 10:30am DRIVERS MEETING
10:00am – 01:00pm Terra-X
01:00pm – 02:00pm LUNCH
01:00pm – 02:00pm Driver Check-In
02:30pm – 04:30pm 4X4 RHYTHMDRAGS
05:00pm – 07:00pm Food Truck / DINNER (for those who don’t want to cook – bring your $’s.)
05:00pm – 07:00pm Driver Check-In
07:00pm – 08:00pm DRIVERS MEETING & NATIONAL ANTHEM
08:00pm – 08:30pm Driver Groups Staging
08:30pm – 12:00pm RECON G6 Stage-1 Night Stage (Headlamps Mandatory)

Saturday July 18th, 2015: TIMES SUBJECT TO CHANGE!!!
08:00am – 10:00am Driver Check-In
09:00am – 09:30am Driver Groups Staging
09:30am – 09:45am DRIVERS MEETING & NATIONAL ANTHEM
10:00am – 3:00pm RECON G6 Stage-2
LUNCH ON THE TRAIL – PACK ACCORDINGLY
04:30pm – 05:30pm Food Truck / DINNER
06:00pm – 09:00pm RECON G6 Stage-3 (Headlamps Mandatory)
08:00pm – 09:00pm Late or Trail DINNER
(you can eat out on the trail if time is needed so pack accordingly)
09:30pm – 11:00pm AWARDS Bonfire (bring your chairs and a stick of wood)

Sunday July 19th, 2015:
Sleep in and travel home safe or Sunday Funday for those who want to scale trail with us…
For more info, check out our past AXIALFEST reports.
Axialfest 2014 – Report By Skeeno
Axialfest 2013 – The Recap!
Axialfest 2012 Skeeno Report

Useful links:
2015 AXIALFEST REGISTRATION SITE
Facebook Event Page
Recon G6
Cisco Grove Campground
How To Waterproof your Receiver
How To Waterproof your SCX10
Make Your Own RC Vehicle Field Tool Pack

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Gearing for Speed

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The Yeti, Yeti XL and EXO Terra Buggy all have one thing in common. All three are built to be able to go fast, and the thing about speed is you always want more. Many factors contribute to how fast a vehicle goes. The main factors include, but are not limited to, the motor, battery, and gearing. While upgrading the motor and battery are common ways to increase speed, gearing also makes a big difference but does so at a fraction of the cost of other modifications. The other thing to know is gearing changes are often needed when making the previously mentioned motor and battery changes.

pinion and spur

Gearing is primarily influenced by what are often called the primary gears, which are the pinion and spur. The pinion is the small gear that attaches directly to the motor’s output shaft.

plastic spur

The spur gear is much larger and is spun by the moving spur gear. The pinion gear is most often metal and spur gears are most often a composite plastic.

spur

There are many options available in the radio control hobby. As such plastic pinions are available, but should never be used for Axial vehicles. Metal spur gears are available and are, in fact stock, on both the kit and RTR Yeti XL vehicles.

The most common question after purchasing an RC vehicle is “how do I make it faster?” As previously mentioned, motors and batteries make a big difference, but gearing is a significant part. The key part is installing a larger tooth count pinion gear will make a vehicle faster. It will also decrease runtime and increase the heat in components such as the motor, speed control and even battery. Installing a smaller tooth-count spur gear will provide the same results. Again, bigger pinion, more speed. Smaller spur, more speed. Speed comes at the expense of more heat and excessive heat will ruin components.

pinion

When installing a new motor, gearing has to be addressed. The stock gearing has been optimized for the stock motor and expected battery. Sometimes nothing has to change, but gearing must be addressed. Often, a smaller pinion is needed to keep temperatures in check. If a battery change is made from NiMH to a 2-cell LiPo or further to a 3-cell LiPo, a significant gearing change may be needed. Often the best high performance setup is a high voltage battery with a mild motor and gearing.

In the end, what most people are confused about is how changing gearing impacts speed. The bottom line is a larger pinion gear will make your Axial vehicle faster. A smaller spur gear will have the same effect.

Venting Tires

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Axial RC vehicles closely mimic real world high performance vehicles in many ways. They both look and function just like what they are modeled after. One exception is how the tires work. Of course, Axial’s tires look extremely realistic. They also are known for providing high performance just like the real tires they replicate. The difference between RC and real tires is what supports the tire. Modern RC high performance tires are supported by foam inserts, as opposed to compressed air. There’s no valve stem on an Axial wheel.

The foams used in Axial tires have been selected to mimic a full-size tire that has been aired down. A full-size tire that has been aired down is able to conform around obstacles and provide a lot more traction than a tire properly inflated for highway use. The firmness of the foam Axial uses provides proper support while still allowing the tires to conform just like real tires.

tire foam

Besides the use of foam inserts in place of compressed air, RC tires are vented and not sealed. The difference is extremely important. If RC tires were sealed, they wouldn’t be able to form around and grip obstacles such as rocks, but even worse, especially with high-speed vehicles such as the Yeti, the tires would act like inflated basket balls and bounce when a vehicle landed. Vent holes allow air to escape and return when a tire impacts the ground. Without breather holes, a sealed tire would bounce like a pogo jumps off.

There are two ways a tire can be vented. One is to vent the wheel and the other is to actually vent the tire.

reamer

Some wheels come with holes already in the wheel. For additional venting, the stock holes can be enlarged with a body reamer or additional holes can be added.

wheels

Axial also offers adjustable venting on some wheels such as the Walker Evans and Method wheels used with the Yeti RTR and kit, respectively.

wheel holes

These are extremely handy as increasing venting by opening more breather holes is not permanent. Take advantage of these features and experiment with different settings. If you plan on running in mostly wet conditions, you can seal up all of the holes to help prevent water from entering and getting trapped inside the tire and wheel. It is always best to take your bead lock wheels apart after driving through water so that the foams can dry out.

punch

Many racers prefer to vent the tires. Do not attempt to do this with a hobby knife. The best way to vent tires is to use a hole punch tool typically used for leather. These tools can be found as cheaply as $5. Typically, these tools can be adjusted for a variety of sized holes. Two holes using the smallest option are usually perfect for RC use. One of the believed benefits of venting the tires is that dirt can get flung out the hole as the tire spins.

If you notice your vehicle bouncing when landing or that the tires don’t conform around obstacles, you should try increasing the venting.

The Ashley Cup 3 Race

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March 20th-22nd marked The Ashley Cup 3 Race at Bechard Raceway located on the same grounds as Glen Helen Raceway in San Bernardino, CA. Each year the event has raised more money than the previous year for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. This year $8,524 was raised through raffles and donations by the 200 people in attendance making it the most successful Ashley Cup Race to date. There were many classes of racing available including several 2wd- 4wd 1/5 scale classes, Nitro & Electric 1/8 Buggy, and even Rock Racing which was held on a different track. Jerry Ellifritz and the U4RC crew did an amazing job getting the Rock Racing track together including a timing system. The Ashley Cup continues to gain popularity every year within the RC community. I am already excited for next year’s event and have no doubt it will be even bigger raising more money for such a great cause. See you at the start line in 2016!

For more information about The Ashley Cup please visit: http://ashleycup.com/

For hundreds of amazing shots of the rock racing action check out this die-hard Axial enthusiasts Flickr album: https://www.flickr.com/photos/astronut101/sets/72157649199353363/

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Axial has grown into one of the top title sponsors at The Ashley Cup.

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A rare and elusive Axial Exo buggy. Every time I get behind the wheel of my Exo I am reminded of how cool they are. They handle very well feeling much like a competition level 4wd buggy does.

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The U4RC Rock Racing track.

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The main 1/8-1/5 scale track.

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A nice panorama shot of both tracks.

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The Rock Racing drivers stand and Jerry’s timing ‘cave’ below.

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A Yeti getting after it doing what it does best: tackling rough terrain at speed.

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An SCX10 with the classic Honcho body getting around the track on 1.9’s.

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Some may remember that Axial had a popular line of nitro burning engines ranging from .21-.32 in size. The Axial .21RR-1 race motor was the last and rarest of all Axial engines. When properly broken in and drinking 30% nitro fuel this .21 could hang with the best of them.

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Axial’s Scott Kerkes raced in the Sportsman 1/8 nitro class using his Axial .21RR-1. You can’t beat the smell of nitro that’s for sure!

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Axial’s Andrew O’Bannon raced in the Sportsman 1/5 2wd class.

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A live band provided Saturday night entertainment after a long day of qualifying.

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Lobster tails, steak, and burgers for dinner. Are we sure we’re at an RC race? Haha!

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Everyone got a glow-in-the-dark Ashley Cup bracelet with their paid entry fee.

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The Axial motor home was littered with vehicles all weekend. It looked more like a hobby store than a camper at times.

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Bacon and chili to top our hotdogs. This makes me hungry just looking at it.

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We caught this Axial fan wheeling around his custom made Mercedes G-Wagon 6X6 so naturally we had to take a peek.

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The G-Wagon 6X6 sported these modified Maxxis 1.9’s.

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The Ashley Cup raffle was a big hit where most everyone bought tickets with the proceeds going straight to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

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Among the raffle items was a Yeti kit and Wraith kit that went home with two lucky winners.

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Raffle participants eagerly waiting to hear their number called.

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The proud winner of the Yeti kit.

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Jerry Ellifritz and the U4RC racers doin-work on the drivers stand.

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A 2.2 class of Yeti’s about to get under way.

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An SCX10 sporting the classic Dingo body. Look at that tire roll!

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Jerry’s Yeti XL next to Scott’s Axial powered 1/8 scale buggy.

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Group shot of all the racers in attendance.

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Scott getting interviewed by MAV TV.

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Sean Garcia getting interviewed by MAV TV. Sean is the man responsible for the Ashley Cup and the owner of Egypt Sean Productions.

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Some provided entertainment for the kids. Although I must admit I kind of wanted to bounce on it myself.

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How many RC events provide a rock wall for your entertainment? This race has it all!

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The all-important sheet showing which main event you will be in.

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Trophies and pit mats for all that placed 1-3 in their perspective class(s).

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Before the main events got underway the Yeti XL got to put on a little demo by running some hot laps around the track. The Yeti XL does pretty good on a track.

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Rounding a corner and bumping the passenger side tires on the inner pipe resulted in this nice side wheelie.

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On a tight track using 1/5 scales sometimes you use each other to help make a corner. Rubbing is racing right?

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The U4RC pit area.

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Cow RC came all the way from the East Coast to support the Ashley Cup. Cow RC provided all the pit mats that class winners received in addition to their trophies.

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Various Rock Racing winners posing with their plaques. It was a long weekend of racing and fun which is evidenced by the closed eyes in the back row. Great job drivers!

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Axial’s own Scott Kerkes pulled out a 1st place finish in Sportsman 1/8 scale buggy. I hadn’t been a pit man for a nitro race in years and boy was that a nerve racking 30min. Haha

AXIALFEST 2015 Sponsor: Team KNK Hardware

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Axial RC Inc. is proud to announce that Team KNK Hardware has been added to the sponsor list for AXIALFEST2015!

About

Team KNK Hardware is a family owned business located in Lebanon, Ohio.  Specializing in stainless steel hardware for the RC industry, they are a husband and wife team that not only work as a business but enjoy the hobby with their children as well.  Since 1986, they have been involved in the RC hobby and finally took it to the next level in 2013.  Starting out with 28,000 pieces of hardware, they have worked hard to become what is now one of the leading suppliers in the RC industry.  Currently stocking over 400,000 pieces of hardware in over 200 sizes.  They pride themselves on customer service and quality products.  If you are looking for a quality product at a great price check them out at www.teamknkhardware.com and let them be “Your Hardware Source.”

AXIALFEST 2015 Sponsor: 212 Performance Gloves

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Axial RC Inc. is proud to announce that 212 Performance Gloves has been added to the sponsor list for AXIALFEST2015!

About

212 Performance Gloves is the leader in touchscreen capable performance gloves.  Take photos, answer a call or send a text without having to take off your gloves to do it! Our gloves offer a performance fit maximizing dexterity, comfort and adjustability.

Like us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/212gloves?ref=hl and for more information visit us online @ www.212gloves.com

AXIALFEST 2015 Sponsor: Car Buff Network

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Axial RC Inc. is proud to announce that CarBuffNetwork.com has been added to the sponsor list for AXIALFEST2015!

About

CarBuffNetwork.com was conceptualized to connect the automotive community starting at the local level.  Many shops do not have a website due no idea how to build it or too expensive to setup and maintain. CarBuffNetwork.com is a worldwide profile based online automotive network. It provides businesses a way to have an inexpensive and search engine optimized web presence.  No special software or computer knowledge is necessary to setup a profile.  Once a profile has been setup, it is easily maintained by the owner.  Profiles are searched by preferred markets and services as well as location. In addition we also profile Projects, Events, Organizations, Travel and Clubs related to the automotive community.

Check out the Axial page on CarBuffNetwork.com: http://carbuffnetwork.com/axial-rc-inc/

AXIALFEST 2015 Sponsor: Vanquish Products

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Axial RC Inc. is proud to announce that Vanquish Products has been added to the sponsor list for AXIALFEST2015!

About

Vanquish Products, home the finest RC crawler and RC scaler parts and accessories. Our products are all designed, manufactured, packaged, and shipped all under one roof at our factory in Sacramento, California. Our product line includes aftermarket parts for Axial based crawlers and scale trucks that we have a desire to raise the performance bar on.

www.vanquishproducts.com • facebook.com/Vanquish-Products